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Is the 'God particle' an impostor?

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posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:36 PM
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Is the 'God particle' an impostor? Scientists claim signal found in Large Hadron Collider may not be Higgs after all

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... HehX



Signals detected from the Large Hadron Collider were hailed as conclusive proof that the 'God particle' - the Higgs boson - had been found after a quest spanning nearly five decades.

But scientists at Cornell University are not so sure.

In a paper published this week, Ian Low, Joseph Lykken and Gabe Shaughnessy of Cornell have cast doubt on what exactly was detected within the Hadron Collider.

'The new resonance discovered by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN
Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could be the long-sought Higgs boson of the Standard Model,' say the scientists.

But the researchers point out that it's far from certain that the particle is the 'standard model Higgs' which scientists have sought for decades to fill in the 'gaps' in the model of physics we currently use to explain the universe.

'We show that current LHC data already strongly disfavor both the dilatonic and non-dilatonic singlet imposters.




Don't get mad at me,
I know nothing, just thought you guys would like to discus it.

Way over my head but I enjoy reading about it.




posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:44 PM
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Hmm. Maybe a mistake, not an *imposter* in the definition of the word.

I'm sure the CERN folks were sure before making a public announcement though.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by Sinny
 






I'm sure the CERN folks were sure before making a public announcement though.


You would think so wouldn't you?

Who funds CERN
How much?




Tom Whyntie is worried. The PhD student works at CERN (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research) on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, which is partly British-funded. “The UK cuts in the science budget are affecting CERN’s research programme already,’’ he says. ''We look pretty bad.” CERN’s funding is to drop by £85 million next year. “The atmosphere is not pleasant.”

www.telegraph.co.uk...

Better come up with something if ya know what I mean.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Aww man and i actually believed them.....wow



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Some other scientists just trying to make a name for themselves.

Nothing to see here move on.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


i know what you mean
everyone wants to be the next Einstein



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:54 PM
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I wouldn't be so sure that CERN scientists were all that certain.

We are on very hard financial times. Funding for the LHC is not at all guaranteed - and I'm certain many of the scientists feel the pressure. The pressure is to release something from the LHC research data to bolster support for its continued operation and the funding of various expeditions (it's not so much funding the LHC so much as it is funding the projects being done at the LHC).

Scientists are just as apt to play politics, dog and pony shows, etc.

And you can't necessarily blame them for wanting to stir up excitement and put the spotlight on the capabilities of the LHC. Fermilab spent decades searching for the Higgs - and the data acquired in a very short order from the LHC is immense and of depth that couldn't be achieved before. The fact that they have results concerning the Higgs this early in the game is something that comes as a bit of a surprise - and it shows the order of magnitude leap in capability (not just with energy potentials but also with measuring equipment).

Which is what I feel the purpose of the release was really about. Less about trying to establish the existence of the Higgs and more about saying: "we collected more in one year than previous attempts have in decades."

In a time when governments are on the verge of economic collapse.

Certainly understandable.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by Aim64C
 


Yea remember this?
www.washingtontimes.com...



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 02:34 PM
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Stupid journalism making a story out of nothing.
Start with a catchy line to set up your hook and give your story importance, even if it's a bit of an exaggeration(or an outright lie)


Signals detected from the Large Hadron Collider were hailed as conclusive proof that the 'God particle' - the Higgs boson - had been found after a quest spanning nearly five decades


Conclusive proof? I seriously doubt, with the importance science places on observable, repeatable fact, that any physicist will jump the gun and call it conclusive proof.

In fact, the conclusion was

'The new resonance discovered by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could be the long-sought Higgs boson of the Standard Model,' say the scientists.


"could be" is the key phrase there.
The other scientists are just trying to urge caution and not to jump the gun before more testing is done. Hardly ground breaking or anything.

Got big stories off evidence of the Higgs? Get big stories off the disproving of the higgs!
It makes me sick when news outlets cover science/technology stories because they have no clue and are just out for traffic, so you'll get a slant even if there is no slant.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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i don't get people who jump up and down soon as they here a news and don't examine it....There is no point to believe in the Higgs Boson, until things are made from it, multiple people test its theory and apply that to something else...

i said the same things when 3D TVs came out... people bought 50inch for $10,000 and it sucked at start, then they perfected the technologies and they price dropped.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by MeesterB
 


Another article


After analyzing the data collected at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, scientists Ian Low, Joseph Lykken and Gabe Shaughnessy at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, claim that these observations may be explained by two other "impostor" particles, which may be masquerading as the fabled Higgs boson:


arxiv.org...

Have we observed the HIGGS imposter,

Maybe it is Satan.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by luciddream
 


Here is the pdf file of the scientist claiming it may be an imposter.
arxiv.org...

There were scientist involved,


After analyzing the data collected at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, scientists Ian Low, Joseph Lykken and Gabe Shaughnessy at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, claim that these observations may be explained by two other "impostor" particles, which may be masquerading as the fabled Higgs boson:

gizmodo.com...

edit on 023131p://bTuesday2012 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 03:00 PM
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So what does the Higgs boson tell us about gravity? You would think a fundamental resonance like the Higgs might explain gravity's role in the design.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 03:03 PM
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Oh yes, let's use a Hollywood celebrity approach to one of the most complex subjects of High-Energy Physics....
What the CERN folks announced was the finding of a particle that seems to fit with what is to be expected of a Higgs Boson.
They said the signal had a 99,9 % probability of it being the real deal.
What means ANYONE can say, "well but it MAY not be the Higgs"... Well, DUH!!!!
I'll steal a phrase from Xkcd "Science: It works b**ches!"



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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Haha, I can't believe a few people on this thread have suddenly decided there's a conspiracy abouts the Higgs lol.

Its come from a "could be" artical featuring a couple of Brits, who probley have nothing better to do, trust me, as much as they would want to blag it for funding, they COULDN'T keep the secret going, the whole worlds gunna be up in your business! Plus, there are other places similar reaseach happens, they don't put all their eggs in one basket you know.

No, scientists wouldn't make a lie about some partical most people aren't even interested in.

IMO of course, I'm open to being corrected, but ill need more than the above to make a decision, a new member just took it as gospel truth to, question more people!

edit on 10-7-2012 by Sinny because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 05:28 PM
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I haven't gotten excited about this because the initial announcement was that they "may" have found something that "behaves they way we think it should"

huh ?



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 08:31 AM
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Geez, and they "found" it on the 4th of July, too.

Maybe the US will now feel obligated to take over the funding of CERN, since the Higgs Boson shares the same birthday and the USA? Wouldn't that be an interesting strategy, with the entire EU getting slammed with austerity cuts these days. An interesting coincidence if nothing else.




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