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Never Get A Cavity Again! EVER!

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posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 06:48 PM
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A new molecule has been discovered that might make tooth cavities a thing of the past, though. One thing is for sure: it’s going to have a few dentists worried about their careers.

It’s not actually sugar that causes cavities, it’s the bacteria Streptococcus Mutans. This bacteria metabolizes the sugar in your mouth and turns it into lactic acid which then attacks your tooth enamel. When that happens your teeth become vulnerable to decay and cavities can form. So, if you remove Streptococcus Mutans from the equation you stop the decay from happening.

Jose Cordova, a researcher at Yale University, along with Erich Astudillo from the University of Chile, have discovered a new molecule called Keep 32 that kills Streptococcus Mutans. The pair already have a patent pending and now want to begin human trials to prove it works. That should take no more than 18 months if they find funding.

If successful, Keep 32 could make its way into toothpaste and other tooth care products, but it could also be added to food to stop the bacteria from causing damage at the time of eating.

If Keep 32 works as described, you can guarantee there will be a lot of interest from the dental and food industries, and in particular companies that currently provide tooth care products. Hopefully one of them doesn’t acquire the patent and shelve it so as to ensure we all keep buying toothpaste and going to the dentist for repair work.

Link

I found this very interesting and am incredibly excited over this discovery! I eat well and perform all the necessary hygiene recommended by dentists, yet I am still always worried about the future of my teeth (and appalled about a few friends' lack of future with their teeth).

I wouldn't have to be worried anymore with this new discovery (I'd still do just as I do now with hygiene for other reasons obviously) - however - the article points out a very good issue. That, of course, is that large dental companies may buy the rights to this discovery and withhold it from the public there for still allowing their sales to stay as they are. I can see this being a possibility, but hope otherwise.

What are your thoughts about this discovery and, more importantly, how do you think the big dental business' will react to it?


edit on 9/7/12 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 06:54 PM
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in our toothpaste


like fluoride.



in our food.


like fluoride.



in everything.


like fluoride.



fluoride 2.0




do not want.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by Ghost147
 


Sounds good, but every time an innovation comes up that could potentially threaten an existing and thriving industry, it seems to fall through the cracks, so I won't hold my breath. I wonder what, if any, potential side effects there may be?
Still a nice find though.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:11 PM
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Good find but if they put it in the toothpaste - a wasted find.

I clean my teeth daily with Colloidal Silver and have done for the past 5 years - result - not one decayed tooth. Prior to this I was having to have treatment nearly every six month.

I never use tooth paste now - Colloidal Gel is all you need for a healthy mouth and teeth.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:23 PM
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reply to post by Ghost147
 



If successful, Keep 32 could make its way into toothpaste and other tooth care products, but it could also be added to food to stop the bacteria from causing damage at the time of eating.

Toothpaste - fine. Food - NOOO!!!!!!!



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:26 PM
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I am a lazy, lazy guy about brushing. I have had one cavity in 26 years. Flouride treatments as a kid. Yeah I may be dumb, but I don't know anyone else who has only had one cavity.

Good news though and good find.


Hopefully one of them doesn’t acquire the patent and shelve it so as to ensure we all keep buying toothpaste and going to the dentist for repair work.


Seriously, that would suck. I'm all for a company making profit, but it irks me that they can just snap up the rights to a product, especially one with real medical value and then squirrel it away from the public.


Streptococcus Mutans.


Tee hee.

ETA totally agree with chaotic. Toothpaste, sure. Food. No thank you.

edit on 9-7-2012 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by SoymilkAlaska


in our toothpaste


like fluoride.

 


So if something could potentially replace fluoride you do not want it?

Check.




posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


39 yo ... never had a cavity. I can hardly believe it myself. I think it's all in the quality of the brushing, but I could be wrong.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:35 PM
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Originally posted by boncho
reply to post by SoymilkAlaska


in our toothpaste


like fluoride.

 


So if something could potentially replace fluoride you do not want it?

Check.



It depends on side effects no? That's why we have clinical trials. Then we see who's funding the trials no?

Then we evaluate the percentages of the results with increased improvement.

IS that with or without flouride? I wanna see both results.

What country posted the results? There's a reason new products in Sciences go through these requirments.

Who's funding it where, and what's the death rate on the down side?
You've seen the commercials.









posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 



So if something could potentially replace fluoride you do not want it?

Soymilk is obviously just overreacting. If they can prove the safety of this stuff then I'll have no problem with it being in my toothpaste... and in fact it's very unlikely this will cause flouride toothpaste to disappear, we'll probably end up with different choices; so we can choose to use flouride toothpaste or Keep 32 toothpaste, or even a mix of both. But you see, anyone who knows anything about flouride doesn't have anything against flouride in their toothpaste (see flouride thread in my signature), the problem is flouride in things that we ingest, such as our water supply. I have no problem with using fluoridated toothpaste because the evidence clearly suggests that it helps, and I spit the excess toothpaste out. However, there is no logical reason to want to ingest the flouride (especially knowing where it comes from), it's only meant to be applied topically (to the surface of teeth). Keep 32 is exactly the same, it works by being applied to the surface of teeth, it doesn't work by being consumed and ingested, and the long term effects of doing as such could be dangerous. Unless they want to put huge red letters on any food which contained Keep 32 (which they obviously wont), then those psychopathic morons can leave our god damn food supply alone!



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:47 PM
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Originally posted by boncho
reply to post by SoymilkAlaska


in our toothpaste


like fluoride.

 


So if something could potentially replace fluoride you do not want it?

Check.




not what im saying, just that it sounds like they want to put it everywhere that fluoride already is.


i hate fluoride, but im worried that this is just another thing they want us to have in our bodies.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:47 PM
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Hmm let me think. From everything ive learned throughout research about Gov, they seem to solely care about keeping the status of the people, meaning that they would most likely NOT want this type of thing to come about because a loss of jobs for dentists, and thus more power to people (even if it is as small and insignificant as cavity free teeth) will lead people to start doing their own things more. which is not what the Gov wants, even though they try to make it seem like they do. I think that if this DOES manage to get into toothpastes and other oral products, it will be because it has been engineered to do something else, similair to the Fluridation process. SO in my opinion, If this does NOT become used everywhere, then it will further reveal the the Gov is keeping its people in STRICT order and keeping things from us. otherwise, if it DOES get used, then there must be a string attached because there is NO way they would sacrfice that many jobs and that much control to the people



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 





I am a lazy, lazy guy about brushing. I have had one cavity in 26 years. Flouride treatments as a kid. Yeah I may be dumb, but I don't know anyone else who has only had one cavity.


I have no cavities and as a result no fillings.

I am supposed to have some special acid in my mouth that eats the bacteria up according to the dentist

Maybe it is the same as this discovery.

My age is around 40



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:55 PM
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the problem is flouride in things that we ingest, such as our water supply.
reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


I always thought the best and fastest way to get something into your system was via the under the tounge or the rectum. Excluding intravenous.

So flouride in toothpaste does not get absorbed in your mouth? That is breaking news....

Not this this is going to turn into a fluoride thread



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by Ghost147
 


Sounds good, but wouldn't make any sense to add to food and risk tons of unintended side effects. Why not just add it to toothpastes or mouthwashes. Surely using it once per day would be enough.

BUT, I wonder why it is any different than Hydrogen Peroxide or Alcohol? Surely those both kill the bacteria as well. Or Ionic Silver, it would surely kill just about anything in one's mouth.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by magma
 



So flouride in toothpaste does not get absorbed in your mouth? That is breaking news....

Of course some of it does get absorbed, but most people only brush their teeth once or twice a day and the process of brushing ones teeth only takes a few minutes and the mouth is rinsed with water when finished. However, a great deal of people drink a great deal of tap water each day because they simply can't afford to keep buying bottled water all the time... that is much worse than simply using a little bit of toothpaste on your teeth once or twice a day. Not to mentioned the flouride in toothpaste is high quality pharmaceutical grade flouride whilst the flouride in tap water is unrefined industrial waste material taken directly from the scrubbers of industrial smoke stacks, the stuff is so toxic that dumping it into the environment is considered an act of terrorism, yet it's perfectly fine to dump it into our water supply.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by linknumbernine
 


How does a loss of Dentist equal more power to the people?



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by Ghost147
 


I brush my teeth after every meal. Since I started doing this, I visit my dentists for checkups only. I do not get my teeth cleaned. That's my job.

If I'm eating away from home, I make sure it is nothing sugary OR I bring a toothbrush. Asian cultures, certain ones, are known to do the same.

If it seems like a hassle, consider the costs of dental repair...especially later in life...bridge...crown? $,$$$....root canal? $,$$$

It's worth the time! Also: floss at least a few times a week, and when you figure it would make sense too!



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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I think a lot of tooth decay and issues like cavities have to do with genetics and environment. My mom has horrible teeth. She lived in an area on long island that is now suffering from contaminated water when she was growing up. nearly everyone exposed had bad teeth later.

Me I'm in my early thirties. I brush my teeth but don't use toothpaste most of the time. I rarely floss. Haven't been to the dentist in years (think they often do more harm than good. And I have not a single cavity or any gum problems. Healthy jaw bone, no loose teeth, nothing. No my breath doesn't smell.

To me the state of medical dentistry is archaic. Dentists are like a step above a chiropractor to me.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by BASSPLYR
 


To me, they're good when you need work done, but they (as business people) really don't care if you get loads of work done. Some do. My dentist is the most genuine guy, ever. He has a binder full of testimonials from patients. Anyway, do those 6 month cleanings really do much good? Probably not. How long does it take before your freshly dentist clean teeth get plaqued up after you leave? If you aren't brushing enough, a month, I'd guess. So for 10 months of the year, your teeth are all nasty.

I think it matters whether you are a girl or a boy, maybe something to do with metabolism. My sister and my female cousin had more cavities than I and my male cousin got growing up. I know my cousin had great hygiene. Her brother did too. She still got cavities. He never had one. I had maybe one, and my sister had more. It could be genetic like you said, but specific to boys/girls.

It might matter where you live too. I find a lot of people from the UK area had awful teeth. (Not trying to off-end.)




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