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Buddha's Life Teaches Us Not To Be Repressed

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posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 06:15 PM
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The Buddha came from royalty. Every desire he may have had was fulfilled. He was able to enjoy all forms of pleasure without limit. Upon becoming curious of the cause of human suffering, he began practicing fairly extreme aestheticism. He practiced intense self-denial while seeking enlightenment. Upon his enlightenment, he realized such extreme denial was not the Way. He spoke of the Middle Way, originally in the context of neither extreme self-denial or self-indulgence, though really applying to all such extremes and dualities.

His life story is itself a teaching. Having had every possible worldy pleasure fulfilled, he determined that it was not the way to true happiness. After engaging in intense aesthetic practices, he determined that this was not the way either. In other words, he took both possible extremes of lifestyles to their limit. He lived a life of extreme self-indulgence, and then extreme self-denial. Through exploring the extremes, he discovered the Middle Way. This indicates that truth and understanding does not come about through repression. Truth flowers when all that has been accumulated is released. If you hear that you are supposed to think or act a certain way, and do it on that account, a repression builds inside. Nirvana is release. By definition, inner repression is anti-thetical to release.

Awareness is what is needed. Honestly, we should explore whatever notions we have accumulated about what is good, what will make us happy, and so on, without any fear or sense of repression. We should not do it with expectations, though, simply awareness. When we allow ourselves to explore whatever it is we have accumulated with awareness, we can see what works and what doens't. We can see that things that we thought would make us happy, don't bring about true lasting satisfaction. When this occurs, it is easy to let go. Now it is not being let go out of conformity and repression, but rather self-knowledge. One who has repressed a desire cannot honestly say he has transcended it. At best he can say he fears it, or does not believe he is capable of attaining it. This is often called transcending a desire, but it is really as I have stated. Buddha did not follow anyone, and he did not repress. When he had explored every notion he had accumulated, and stopped following anybody, only then was he enlightened. This is the only way.
edit on 9-7-2012 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-7-2012 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


To me, Nirvana is the absolute lack of desire. When you no longer want anything, that is when your mind is clear, and that is when you learn the most important things in life.

The way is clear. The light is bright. You want nothing. Your life is perfect...because perfection is a lack of desire.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 06:37 PM
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very wise words my friend,
star nd flag
these are observations that can be useful over a life time as we change in our awareness and understanding,
the path to enlightenment is always a step process,
first you must take a step



peace and light

xploder



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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Why are the buddhist countrys so oppressed and backwards? Why are they so filthy.
If this buddha stuff is so fantastic why do the countrys associated with budhism so pathetic and the people so badly treated.
Burma is buddhist and its terrible
Cambodia is terribly poor and the people oppressed
Vietnam is not exactly modern,
Thailand as lovely as it is, not a place I would live in
You should spend time over in these countrys, these people immigrate because these religions are valueless and dont help each other.
Buddists worship rocks and tree carvings, buddhism is blind idol worship.

I bet you would not go to a hospital in a buddhist country, cos they are backwards.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:04 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


Would Buddha have reached enlightenment without first going to those extremes and living the middle path his whole life?



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:28 PM
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Buddha is wise and full of wisdom
i agree with his words



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by borntowatch
 


I have no doubt that there has been a great man called Budha.
But Buddhism of today is empty, that is the problem.
It has become an ideal, something to strive for, through a teaching.
This would imply that wisdom can be bought from a bookstore, this is not the case.
All that we learn through education and reading is knowledge, wisdom comes from within.
A real buddha would teach nothing, he would say, conform is not the way, so don't follow.
Be who you are, what you are, not who or what you want to be, that is just a thought an ideal, wanting to become.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


You seek acknowledgement not awareness. To be aware is to perceive, and be conscious of what is going on around you. To acknowledge is to validate and own up to it. The ability to perceive and respond.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by TheSubversiveOne
reply to post by TheJourney
 


Would Buddha have reached enlightenment without first going to those extremes and living the middle path his whole life?


That is a good and interesting question. I would say it all depends on one's own personal tendencies. I believe every individual must explore fully his or her own tendencies, which are by their nature extreme. The understanding behind the middle way is that all thoughts and actions are really manifestations of one polar end, or one extreme. In their pure form, then, they are extreme. I think the middle path should be kept in mind as being the best way, but one should not make a dogma, law, or moral code about it. I think that ultimately we must explore everything that is within us before Buddhahood is realized. If you do not explore certain things now, you will, in this life or another. When one has explored everything that he has accumulated over his many lifetimes fully, and is able to let it all go, then one is Buddha.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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Originally posted by TheJourney

Originally posted by TheSubversiveOne
reply to post by TheJourney
 


Would Buddha have reached enlightenment without first going to those extremes and living the middle path his whole life?


That is a good and interesting question. I would say it all depends on one's own personal tendencies. I believe every individual must explore fully his or her own tendencies, which are by their nature extreme. The understanding behind the middle way is that all thoughts and actions are really manifestations of one polar end, or one extreme. In their pure form, then, they are extreme. I think the middle path should be kept in mind as being the best way, but one should not make a dogma, law, or moral code about it. I think that ultimately we must explore everything that is within us before Buddhahood is realized. If you do not explore certain things now, you will, in this life or another. When one has explored everything that he has accumulated over his many lifetimes fully, and is able to let it all go, then one is Buddha.


If that was the case, his attempts at living to the extremes would have been entirely necessary. So in a sense, to reach Buddha-hood you must at some point in your life, explore both extremes. So he's contradicting his own middle path. Interesting thoughts.

edit on 9-7-2012 by TheSubversiveOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 09:45 PM
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"For both excessive and insufficient exercise destroy one's strength, and both eating and drinking too much or too little destroy health, whereas the right quantity produces, increases or preserves it. So it is the same with temperance, courage and the other virtues... This much then, is clear: in all our conduct it is the mean that is to be commended." -Aristotle


edit on 9-7-2012 by BlueMule because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 10:28 PM
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Originally posted by TheSubversiveOne

Originally posted by TheJourney

Originally posted by TheSubversiveOne
reply to post by TheJourney
 


Would Buddha have reached enlightenment without first going to those extremes and living the middle path his whole life?


That is a good and interesting question. I would say it all depends on one's own personal tendencies. I believe every individual must explore fully his or her own tendencies, which are by their nature extreme. The understanding behind the middle way is that all thoughts and actions are really manifestations of one polar end, or one extreme. In their pure form, then, they are extreme. I think the middle path should be kept in mind as being the best way, but one should not make a dogma, law, or moral code about it. I think that ultimately we must explore everything that is within us before Buddhahood is realized. If you do not explore certain things now, you will, in this life or another. When one has explored everything that he has accumulated over his many lifetimes fully, and is able to let it all go, then one is Buddha.


If that was the case, his attempts at living to the extremes would have been entirely necessary. So in a sense, to reach Buddha-hood you must at some point in your life, explore both extremes. So he's contradicting his own middle path. Interesting thoughts.

edit on 9-7-2012 by TheSubversiveOne because: (no reason given)


You have a good understanding of it. To me, this sort of necessity of extremes has always been implicit in the Buddhist teachings, though it seems that the majority of Buddhist practitioners do not explore this aspect, and focus on 'following the straight and narrow.' One correlary is that any center by definition needs two ends in order to exist. There is no such thing as a center without two extreme ends. So two the center or middle way the Buddha speaks of is an integration of both extremes, rather than an avoidance of them. So the middle way is BOTH extremes, rather than neither extreme. When you integrate two extremes, you get a center, a middle.

I remember having this 'image' in my mind in the past, of an enlightened Buddha or Tao master sitting absolutely still in meditation, absolutely calm in the middle, doing nothing. Out of his mind came the entire world, and all of its inhabitants, including all their extreme behaviors.He was calm and unpulled because he understood it was him who was doing everything in the world, and therefore felt no pull towards anything.
edit on 9-7-2012 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-7-2012 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)



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