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"Take it with a grain of salt"--means what, exactly?

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posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:39 PM
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I have heard this expression before but never really gave it much thought. Naturally, I see it all the time on ATS. I suppose “taking it with a grain of salt” means that one should continue to remain skeptical about a topic.

Here’s what I don’t get though. Wouldn’t “a grain of salt” make something more savory and flavorful, therefore, more likeable? Wouldn't I be more inclined to agree with the topic instead of appearing skeptical? I like salt. I add it to my food to enhance the flavor. If I added a grain of salt to a topic of discussion—seems to me it would make it more appealing. Its seems like an inaccurate colloquialism.

On that same note. I really don’t understand these two expressions: “..like it’s going out of style” and/or “…like there’s no tomorrow”. Such as, “I was listening to the Bee-Gees like they were going out of style.”

What is being expressed here is that one is continuously, unceasingly doing said activity. But if there were no tomorrow and it was going out of style—seems to me that said activity would be neglected and just not done at all!

I’m not trying to be another George Carlin here. I don’t have the talent haha.

But does this make sense to anybody? Or am I just a clueless simpleton?

edit on 7-7-2012 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-7-2012 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-7-2012 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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durrr...
edit on 7-7-2012 by ValentineWiggin because: (no reason given)

sorry
edit on 7-7-2012 by ValentineWiggin because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:42 PM
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salt flavors things.

So if its bad, take it with some salt, salt being your ability to get over it.

it makes things bearable to consume...
edit on 7-7-2012 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 


Huh, interesting interpretation. Thanks for answering my conundrum without insulting me like the above poster felt was necessary.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by NarcolepticBuddha
 


Np...

She was probably just channeling Peter not Valentine Wiggin.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:49 PM
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ive always thought of it as its been salted like you would poor quality food so dont take the flavor (or entertainment value) as an indicator of the quality of the food (or arguments statements etc.)



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by NarcolepticBuddha
 


I think the saying came from a roman general who thought that ingesting small amounts of poison would render him immune to being poisoned . He ingested them with small amounts of salt to hide the bitter taste .



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by sirhumperdink
 


Yeah, makes me wonder why "a grain" and not "take it with heaping spoonfuls of salt because this is just crap." The English language and their myriad, untranslatable colloquialisms--god love it haha.

Edit: Seems to have been answered above! Thanks members of ATS--always there for any of my trivial questions in my quest to deny ignorance!
edit on 7-7-2012 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-7-2012 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by NarcolepticBuddha
 


Mary Poppins remedy was a spoonful of sugar to get the medicine down !!



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by rick004
 


That's the winning combination right there. From now on, I'm going to take my grain of salt with a spoonful of sugar!



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:59 PM
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Hi - Here is what I found, OP:


Meaning

To take a statement with 'a grain of salt' or 'a pinch of salt' means to accept it but to maintain a degree of skepticism about its truth.

Origin

The idea comes from the fact that food is more easily swallowed if taken with a small amount of salt. Pliny the Elder translated an ancient antidote for poison with the words 'be taken fasting, plus a grain of salt'.


Here is a link to the full explanation - kind of interesting, actually!

Grain of Salt - meaning



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by NarcolepticBuddha
 


By George I think he's got it !!! Have a great weekend !!



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by AboveBoard
 


Excellent find! I probably should have just researched it myself--but you know finding phrase usages, meanings, and origins can be spotty with internet searches sometimes. A lot of interpretations and explanations turn out to be false, and ultimately urban legends or whatever else.

I was hoping we could crack this one wide open and you guys have.

edit on 7-7-2012 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:26 PM
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I will take my tequila with a grain of salt.. I don't always drink but when i do i prefer patron..
.. Just saying



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:43 PM
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reply to post by NarcolepticBuddha
 


It's an expression (a natively British one, it seems). It means don't take a given statement at face value, because there's a good chance it's BS.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:58 PM
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Originally posted by rick004
reply to post by NarcolepticBuddha
 


I think the saying came from a roman general who thought that ingesting small amounts of poison would render him immune to being poisoned . He ingested them with small amounts of salt to hide the bitter taste .


I'll would also add that the meaning since that time has morphed a bit...

Now it means...my previous statement is purely conjecture, I have no proof, believe what you will
of it and make up your own mind



posted on May, 23 2013 @ 10:10 AM
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I don't mean to bring a dead thread to life... but I had an interesting thought about this phrase you're questioning here...

Perhaps, the phrase became "viral" as a colloquial idiom... because of it's variety of uses to COVER up something. Whether it be for healing or concealing... A curious linkage to skepticism, no?

The Latin word salis means both "salt" and "wit," so that the Latin phrase "cum grano salis" could be translated as both "with a grain of salt" and "with a grain (small amount) of wit." (wiki)



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