New Inca Trail leading to Machu Picchu Found

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posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:27 AM
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We probably will have to wait a few hours or days until we can have an english language source, it's fresh news. Meanwhile, I'm trying to translate for you the source I got.



The trail is about four kilometers long and leads to Machu Picchu area. Exciting news in my opinion, considering that this road is still there, after 500 years or more.

According to Oscar Montufar La Torre, resident archaeologist of the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu, the paved road has a width of 1.70 meters, and arrives at the archaeological site of K'antupata.

The new trail rejoins the traditional road by kilometer 33, between the joint archaeological and Wiñayhuayna Intipunku, just 3.7 kilometers away from the sanctuary of Machu Picchu.

Along the route there are retaining walls up to ten feet high, a tunnel of ten meters with 28 stairways, abutments of a bridge of five meters, drains, canals, stairways and balconies.

The new trail discovered, is four kilometers and 31 meters long and more than 3,600 meters above sea level, maintains its original characteristics by 70 percent, covered with moss and several species of orchids and ferns.

Adding now this link to the first video released, not the best quality but it helps :

www.rpp.com.pe...


Sources :

elcomercio.pe...
www.larepublica.pe...
edit on 7-7-2012 by Trueman because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:10 AM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Very nice find mate
Did a quick translate and it mentions an administrative or military use for the trail. Considering the tunnel, it wouldn't surprise me if it was used as a quick getaway/exit for the higher ups if they were overrun. Very cool.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:25 AM
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Originally posted by Stonesplitter
reply to post by Trueman
 


Very nice find mate
Did a quick translate and it mentions an administrative or military use for the trail. Considering the tunnel, it wouldn't surprise me if it was used as a quick getaway/exit for the higher ups if they were overrun. Very cool.


Thank you. Yes, I also believe it has militar purpose, the walls and tunnel were perfect to move troops in secret. Besides that, it's parallel to the original trail, so the regular population wouldn't notice any militar deployment.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:28 AM
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awesome find.. i love stuff like this... i believe there's plenty more still to be discovered.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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Very cool, awesome find! Interested to learn more.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 09:26 PM
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Nice and interesting find !!!



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 06:01 AM
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I saw this in a dream several years ago! Call me crazy if you want, it was just like this and it took me to Machu Pichu. I felt ever so strange when I woke up.



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 09:46 AM
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Originally posted by Wide-Eyes
I saw this in a dream several years ago! Call me crazy if you want, it was just like this and it took me to Machu Pichu. I felt ever so strange when I woke up.


Can you help me find my car keys?



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 09:55 AM
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Originally posted by Wide-Eyes
I saw this in a dream several years ago! Call me crazy if you want, it was just like this and it took me to Machu Pichu. I felt ever so strange when I woke up.


You should think about a trip to Machu Picchu, "Answer the Call".

edit on 8-7-2012 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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In the middle of the video I spotted a monolithic stone that seemed to be cut very sharply to display a fine wall.
Not bad for hunter gatherer's . Were finding tunes of stuff all around the world that is truly making what mainstream education has taught us completely false.and it has to change! So sad that our big machinery can't be brought around these parts to really get at the truth. If only the governments of these ancient places understand that big money and tourism can helped these countries thrive.



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 10:13 AM
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Originally posted by thetiler
In the middle of the video I spotted a monolithic stone that seemed to be cut very sharply to display a fine wall.
Not bad for hunter gatherer's .

What makes you think that the Incas were hunter-gatherers? They and the cultures leading up to them practiced intensive farming...just what you need to support a complex society.



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by thetiler
In the middle of the video I spotted a monolithic stone that seemed to be cut very sharply to display a fine wall.
Not bad for hunter gatherer's . Were finding tunes of stuff all around the world that is truly making what mainstream education has taught us completely false.and it has to change! So sad that our big machinery can't be brought around these parts to really get at the truth. If only the governments of these ancient places understand that big money and tourism can helped these countries thrive.


Who knows, that stone could be an intiwatana that survived the spaniards. In ancient times, there were intiwatanas all over the empire.

Regarding the last part of your post, spaniards came while a civil war was taking place and the empire was divided in 2 sides. Revolutionary ideas invaded the empire, with new concepts getting popular like better distribution of the wealth, the first "Republic" of America was about to be born. But you know what happened.



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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Originally posted by ladyteeny
awesome find.. i love stuff like this... i believe there's plenty more still to be discovered.


I agree, stuff like this makes me believe that their is still so many new things out there that have yet to be discovered, its exciting. Thanks for the post OP



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 12:16 PM
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Great thread, I enjoy articles like this =D This is right up my alley! Yep yep, more translation is needed I agree, so some questions for for OP/whoever out there after properly translated:




The trail is about four kilometers long and leads to Machu Picchu area. Exciting news in my opinion, considering that this road is still there, after 500 years or more.

According to Oscar Montufar La Torre, resident archaeologist of the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu, the paved road has a width of 1.70 meters, and arrives at the archaeological site of K'antupata.



- How was the road "paved"? Does this mean poured concrete/cement steps for a path up and down a mountain, or a graded, flat road pave concrete/cement/asphalt/whatever? Or stone steps/road? Just wondering because the image shows stairs.




The new trail rejoins the traditional road by kilometer 33, between the joint archaeological and Wiñayhuayna Intipunku, just 3.7 kilometers away from the sanctuary of Machu Picchu.

Along the route there are retaining walls up to ten feet high, a tunnel of ten meters with 28 stairways, abutments of a bridge of five meters, drains, canals, stairways and balconies.



And the walls, made of stone and cement? Made of stone/mud? The canals, on the ground level or up high? Same with stairs, out of rocks or cement? What was the cement made composed from?




The new trail discovered, is four kilometers and 31 meters long and more than 3,600 meters above sea level, maintains its original characteristics by 70 percent, covered with moss and several species of orchids and ferns.



Sounds about right... mossy but no place for roots for plants. So then the walls were either paved or could be stone or something else that would not allow root growth for deep plants. If it were concrete, it would have most likely cracked by now, allowing some plants to grow in the cracks. blah.. too many assumptions not enough info!




Adding now this link to the first video released, not the best quality but it helps :

www.rpp.com.pe...


Sources :

elcomercio.pe...
www.larepublica.pe...
edit on 7-7-2012 by Trueman because: (no reason given)


Interesting thread thanks!!! S&F! Looking forward to more info =)



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 03:08 PM
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reply to post by Philippines
 


Yeah, my bad. That happens when you trust too much in google translate. No cement used there. All stones.


Something like this :



Thanks for your post
edit on 8-7-2012 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Yeah that sounds about right using stones and not concrete. Where I live here there are villages going back 300-500 years and you can find some old stone paths and stone rice terrace walls, but concrete is a recent thing -- and not necessarily good because it can increase the possibility for landslides.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by mrnotobc
 


Wish I could man! My weird dream was probably just coincidently similar to this.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 11:18 AM
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Nice post Trueman.

The Inca and their associated conquered states did have a wonderful level of craftsmanship!



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 02:35 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
Nice post Trueman.

The Inca and their associated conquered states did have a wonderful level of craftsmanship!


Thanks Hans. You know, I wonder if this path can be a clue to reveal a way to Paititi.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 09:50 AM
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Originally posted by Trueman

Originally posted by Hanslune
Nice post Trueman.

The Inca and their associated conquered states did have a wonderful level of craftsmanship!


Thanks Hans. You know, I wonder if this path can be a clue to reveal a way to Paititi.


It might but Paititi, if it existed, would be much farther to the East. Considering the extent in which the Inca and others fled the domains of the Spanish and later hostility to later explorers in that region and other cities they set up there could be another one out there somewhere...

I can suggestion the book Exploration of the Valley of the Amazon, 1851-1852 by an American Navy expedition lead by William Herndon who encountered just such hositility when he travelled thru the Andes to the Amazon river





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