Ancient Stone Shaping and Setting

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posted on Jul, 6 2012 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by randyvs
 


Yeah, you gotta love the style of these things. This type of "butt fit" masonry with so many angles, even slightly curved as well as the size of the stone blocks really isn't normal for this day and age. These guys definitely knew something we don't now. We honestly can't replicate it..........YET!




posted on Jul, 6 2012 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by Stonesplitter
reply to post by randyvs
 


Yeah, you gotta love the style of these things. This type of "butt fit" masonry with so many angles, even slightly curved as well as the size of the stone blocks really isn't normal for this day and age. These guys definitely knew something we don't now. We honestly can't replicate it..........YET!


Look at the lower left of the center stone in the pic. Those nots appear at random throughout the walls. They have to be a clue. On your left as you look at the stone.
edit on 6-7-2012 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by randyvs
 


For the life of me.........I just can't quite wrap my head around those. They're some kind of sag or drip I'm thinking from where the stone was softened. You can even see scrape or drag marks around the edge of the each piece too (mainly the larger ones). If there was some kind of form work, they could even be where the frame was pulled away. One of the plants used, ate into the stone I believe, another plant apparently turned it into a kind of jelly. There could be some ratio of the mix which turned it into a type of play dough. But, yeah.......intriguing for sure.



posted on Jul, 6 2012 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by Stonesplitter
 

"I believe that this was used to manipulate the massive stones used in the construction of many ancient structures, possibly by the use of musical instruments or even chants. "

sort of like Metallica turned up to eleven?




posted on Jul, 6 2012 @ 07:56 PM
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check out 32:00. pretty interesting if you ask me.




posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 04:43 AM
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Originally posted by sonnny1
reply to post by Stonesplitter
 


I believe that man had the knowledge to do things, we cannot do today, even with the most sophisticated equipment. We are weaker version of our ancestors, when it comes to creating works of stone, like these.
Just MHO.........

Great thread !


EXACTLY !

Our first mistake is making assumptions about when and how these constructions were made. In many cases the constructions left seem to be older than the cultures that occupy them. Besides that, just look at the time frame these cultures had, it results hard to believe they acquired all the knowledge needed to built all that, in just a few centuries.

Foreign intervention in the developement of human civilization in pre-columbian South America is undeniable. There must be another great ancient culture beyond time, I mention "Huyustus" in a previous post here, that's just one of many examples we have.

This mysterious intervention is well accepted by locals and also children in school learn about it in Peru, Bolivia and the rest of the area. If you stop a person in Cuzco and ask him who found the Incas Empire, the answer will be: "Manco Capac and Mama Ocllo".



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:30 AM
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reply to post by Trueman
 



LEGENDS SAY that a bearded white man, with fair hair and blue eyes, brought super-knowledge to the Maya. He taught them the mysteries of the heavens, the laws of mathematics and astronomy, and the skills of the artisan. He taught them to build their pyramids and palaces of stone. Above all else, he taught them wisdom; that purification would come though sacrifice, and that immortality awaited the souls of the pure. They say that when he died he became the morning star, Venus. He walked, in turn, among the Olmec, the Teotihuacanos, the Maya, Toltec and Aztec. They called him Quetzalcoatl, the feathered snake, god of goodness and wisdom. Others, too, spoke of the bearded white man. The Incas, in Peru, called him Viracocha, while their neighbours the Aymara called him Hyustus. In Bolivia he was known as the "God of the Wind". To the Polynesians he was known as Kon-Tiki, the Sun-God, Always, when he left, his promise was the same: one day he would return. More evidence of the legend of "Quetzalcoatl" exists in the tomb of the Mayan priest-king Lord Pacal, at Palenque, in Mexico, than anywhere else. We know this from secret pictures encoded into Mayan artefacts, revealed for the first time in 1993, when the code of Maya carving was finally broken. These show Lord Pacal quite clearly, unambiguously, as a feathered snake. They knew, from his teachings, that the sun affected fertility and that the world had been created four times before and that each creation ended in catastrophic destruction, which they blamed on the sun. To them the sun was God.
Source

It must be awesome to get to see a lot of this first hand like you have mate. Even these legends coming from the people themselves hold far more weight in my opinion, than any critically thinking scientist could dish out. Further on in the article it states the Egyptians had a similar belief as well. Have the people of Peru/Bolivia etc. ever mentioned to you personally who or how these were constructed? Again, full credit to you for living around these parts before and getting first hand informed opinions. Excellent stuff!



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 05:49 AM
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Originally posted by Stonesplitter
reply to post by yampa
 


That's the stupidest question I've heard, It is quite obviously rock, as it was quarried, do you know what a quarry is?
As I said earlier, in the case of the Egyptians there is NO DOUBT it is rock......whether or not it was dissolved and reformed or natural is another question, have you heard of Limestone? as for the South American walls, well you're either being deliberately obtuse, or again, like the other two.........you know nothing about masonry! Go figure



I didn't read far enough down your initial post, but I now see you mentioned & linked to stuff about geopolymers and Joseph Davidovits yourself. heh, why are y'all arguing with me then?
I didn't mean concrete in the modern sense, I was just meaning a limestone aggregate.

I'm quite happy that this theory is being applied to South American sites now too. It would be nice to have proper material analysis of all these sites to establish whether this liquid rock technique really was used. It shouldn't be too hard to tell?

Ancient concrete is bit more easy to prove than sonic levitation :p



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:12 AM
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Originally posted by yampa

Originally posted by Stonesplitter
reply to post by yampa
 


That's the stupidest question I've heard, It is quite obviously rock, as it was quarried, do you know what a quarry is?
As I said earlier, in the case of the Egyptians there is NO DOUBT it is rock......whether or not it was dissolved and reformed or natural is another question, have you heard of Limestone? as for the South American walls, well you're either being deliberately obtuse, or again, like the other two.........you know nothing about masonry! Go figure



I didn't read far enough down your initial post, but I now see you mentioned & linked to stuff about geopolymers and Joseph Davidovits yourself. heh, why are y'all arguing with me then?
I didn't mean concrete in the modern sense, I was just meaning a limestone aggregate.

I'm quite happy that this theory is being applied to South American sites now too. It would be nice to have proper material analysis of all these sites to establish whether this liquid rock technique really was used. It shouldn't be too hard to tell?

Ancient concrete is bit more easy to prove than sonic levitation :p


No, no concrete at all. They are plain rocks. Incas using concrete is the weirdest thing I've ever heard about this, honestly.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:12 AM
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Originally posted by Trueman

Originally posted by sonnny1
reply to post by Stonesplitter
 


I believe that man had the knowledge to do things, we cannot do today, even with the most sophisticated equipment. We are weaker version of our ancestors, when it comes to creating works of stone, like these.
Just MHO.........

Great thread !


EXACTLY !

Our first mistake is making assumptions about when and how these constructions were made. In many cases the constructions left seem to be older than the cultures that occupy them. Besides that, just look at the time frame these cultures had, it results hard to believe they acquired all the knowledge needed to built all that, in just a few centuries.

Foreign intervention in the developement of human civilization in pre-columbian South America is undeniable. There must be another great ancient culture beyond time, I mention "Huyustus" in a previous post here, that's just one of many examples we have.

This mysterious intervention is well accepted by locals and also children in school learn about it in Peru, Bolivia and the rest of the area. If you stop a person in Cuzco and ask him who found the Incas Empire, the answer will be: "Manco Capac and Mama Ocllo".



"They teach men the rules of civilized life and worship their creator god, the sun. But first, Ayar Manco and mama Ocllo should establish a capital. Inti (sounds suspiciously similar to the Sumerian Enki) entrusted to them a golden rod by saying this:
From the vast lake, where you reach, march northward. Every time you stop to eat or to sleep you must plant this golden staff into the ground. Where it sink without effort, you will built the Cuzco and will lead the Empire of the Sun."

hmmmmm??? that "golden rod" sounds like the gods just gave them some sort of technology. When are people going to realize this "mysterious" "advanced" technology wasn't thought up in a f'n cave?
edit on 7-7-2012 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:22 AM
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Originally posted by yampa
Ancient concrete is bit more easy to prove than sonic levitation :p


but the thing is ancient concrete is more of an argument in favor of alien intervention than normal humans. If they (the normal humans in the areas) could do such a thing why wouldn't they capitalize on the idea and build even bigger and badder structures? How could something so simple, so easy to do be forgotten and not only by S.Americans but all over the world. Not only that but these sites with these structures line up perfectly on the surface of the Earth with each other and have correlations with celestial alignments. How is that kind of thing a coincidence? We're acting like slack-jawed morons to ignore what is staring us right in the face.
edit on 7-7-2012 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:33 AM
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reply to post by yampa
 


Apologies mate
Was getting irritated with a couple of other lads who were giving their 2 cents and not supporting it with anything. I like a good argument if there is support for it, just not from the one eyed serial debunkers who have no faith in anything BUT science. And your right, the concrete/mortar aspect is certainly easier to swallow......It's just something I work with for a living and understand that this isn't the case now.

At present we do not know exactly how all the ‘Inca-style’ structures were built. The use of stone-softening agents for softening the surface of stone blocks or for softening or disaggregating entire blocks prior to pouring or compacting the material into moulds cannot be ruled out. The use of advanced tools is also a possibility. The only thing that is beyond doubt is that the primitive manual techniques favoured by mainstream researchers cannot explain everything.
Source

Back when I meditated a lot (no drugs or alcohol) I also saw some very interesting things about the world which I can't or wont explain here (not the place for it). But this also causes me to "jump" quickly when people dismiss the extraordinary. I stopped meditating for a reason, but still use mantras to center myself.

No hard feelings mate



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:39 AM
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reply to post by bottleslingguy
 


Excellent response. We are most definitely behind the 8 ball trying to comprehend this sort of thing. It goes beyond what the average scientist can comprehend. Also, these types only get funding for their research if they posit a theory that isn't too far out of the box, so it goes without saying that they don't want to go against the grain of mainstream thinking in general.

Cheers mate



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 06:42 AM
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Originally posted by Stonesplitter
reply to post by yampa
 


Apologies mate
Was getting irritated with a couple of other lads who were giving their 2 cents and not supporting it with anything. I like a good argument if there is support for it, just not from the one eyed serial debunkers who have no faith in anything BUT science. And your right, the concrete/mortar aspect is certainly easier to swallow......It's just something I work with for a living and understand that this isn't the case now.

At present we do not know exactly how all the ‘Inca-style’ structures were built. The use of stone-softening agents for softening the surface of stone blocks or for softening or disaggregating entire blocks prior to pouring or compacting the material into moulds cannot be ruled out. The use of advanced tools is also a possibility. The only thing that is beyond doubt is that the primitive manual techniques favoured by mainstream researchers cannot explain everything.
Source

Back when I meditated a lot (no drugs or alcohol) I also saw some very interesting things about the world which I can't or wont explain here (not the place for it). But this also causes me to "jump" quickly when people dismiss the extraordinary. I stopped meditating for a reason, but still use mantras to center myself.

No hard feelings mate


I think this is part of what you're looking for. He has also softened high strength steel bars like jelly through power amplifiers sending frequencies through crystals. also notice the batteries he makes out of rocks. I love how he mentions the "hotspot" in the mineral battery





or some people prefer to believe this:



personally I think Hutcheson is on the right track
edit on 7-7-2012 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 07:02 AM
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reply to post by bottleslingguy
 


Man, those first 2 vids were awesome, thanks for that. I hadn't seen them before, and was ultra impressed with the cannonball being lifted. Use of crystals are something the ancients specifically placed in chambers for a good reason.

The specific and exclusive use of piezoelectric calcite and quartz crystals for the construction of the megalithic chambers and pyramids themselves, and the large basins that once surrounded them in great numbers, relates to their transducive capacity to focus and amplify acoustic waves. Mechanical flexing occurs in the quartz and calcite crystals as a uniform structural deformation that generates standing waves within the stones' crystalline lattice, eventually building a strong electromagnetic field that allows acoustic levitation.
Source

Very impressive, and understandable why the Gov. had him doing work for them.


Edit: The third vid I hadn't seen, but I read the story on a website and left it out for a reason. That appears to be a bunch of guys putting on a show for the tourists to me. Thanks for the link though mate
edit on 7/7/12 by Stonesplitter because: comment on 3rd vid



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by Stonesplitter
 

thanks! I did mean that last video as a joke. it's funny how after you sit there for 8 mins the thing never levitates. Sitchin writes about crystals being placed in strategic niches in the Giza Pyramid as the components of a larger machine. Atlanteans were said to have had crystal machines and such also.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 09:38 AM
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Great thread StoneSplitter. S&F most definitely. This subject has always fascinated me. I personally believe our ancient ancestors had knowledge that has been lost to us. If the Spanish hadn't almost completely destroyed the Mayans maybe we would know more. However I believe the techniques used are much older than the Mayan civilization.

All the ancient architecture around the globe points to an older source civilization I believe. Science has been cramming ridiculous explanations down our throats for years. Problem is they are SCIENTISTS not Stone Masons.

Acoustic levitation is really interesting to me. Once again great thread.



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by bottleslingguy
 



Cool. I spent some time in the Ananatapur district and know how the locals like to have a bit of fun with the tourists. In saying that, I experienced some of the weirdest things in this place! From what I've read about the Atlantean people, I agree that they used crystals to power, heal and even destroy part of the continent they existed on with them. I'm still unsure where they, Lemuria and Og would be located as there is a bunch of theories from off the coast of the U.S to South America, across to Ireland (or close to it) and even near India. The interesting thing is all of the underwater sites that have been found, even the one off the coast of Japan. I like Cayce's view or readings on this stuff, boggles the mind!



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by TheIrishJihad
 


Much appreciated mate
I agree, a lot of this work appears to be much older than we think, possibly by many thousands of years. I think a lot of the evidence is purely in the stone itself. Simply for the fact it can stand the tests of time. It's like anything we build these days just doesn't last, even concrete has a shelf life of about 100 years or so (could be less).

Cheers mate



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by Stonesplitter
 


Living in the tidewater area of VA I've been to the Edgar Cayce museum quite a few times. Interesting place indeed.

I agree that the ancients knew things that we are completely ignorant to. We are all offspring of an advanced, as of yet undiscovered civilization. Ancient mythology surely points in that direction. Yet it baffles me how people can still blindly accept the mainstream viewpoint.





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