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The U.S. Needs To Bury The Electrical Grid ~ Civilization On The Razors Edge

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posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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I know that we are all aware of this issue and I know that the problem is due to financial constraints. But it's never our problem until our lights are the ones that go out.

Seems like every time the wind blows were in the dark.

With the recent catastrophic storms in the Mid-West and Mid-Atlantic, I'm sure that millions in that area would agree. Living without the basic needs of food and water (and the internet!
) will push people to do desperate things.

I live in Hurricane alley and have seen civilization almost break within a week. When there is no food for the children or gasoline to go get food it's a huge problem. Literally within a week I have seen the news clips of people murdering for cutting in line at the mile long gasoline station line for the few stations open. We went without electricity for almost a month after one hurricane and we did ok only because we were prepared with lots of canned and dried food and natural gas stove and hot water and didn't waste our gasoline riding around looking at the fallen trees!

Most American families only keep enough food stocked for three days, ATS members excluded. This is a foresight issue and everyone should be a little more prepared, but that's the nature of the beast and where part of the problem is, but only part. If we had an underground system in the first place we wouldn't have as big of an issue.

Ever notice that the lights hardly ever go out in the major urban cities like New York and Chicago, because they saw this as in issue and fixed it by putting the systems underground.

I don't have the answers to expediently resolve this issue, but we know it comes down to money. I would happily pay my part to avoid chaos in dark times. Were one nationwide catastrophe from total breakdown and it could happen within a week of the catastrophe. Your life could be at stake.

I know that this seems like a moot point. Our current system is half to a full century old and if we don't fix it say goodbye to your current lifestyle.

Fix it!!


edit on 4-7-2012 by timewalker because: (no reason given)

edit on 4-7-2012 by timewalker because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by timewalker
 


burrial is simply not practical for 33 Kv hi tension national grid routes



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by ignorant_ape
 
I understand. But where possible it should be done for the smaller residential and commercial feeds.

I know one thing that would help. Stop giving foreign aid to so many countries and we could have the money to fix our own neanderthal systems of road, rail and electrical the first year!

Our country is crumbling and we give away billions if not trillions every single year.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:18 AM
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We've been burying our cables in the UK over the last 30-40 years and its expensive compared to just running a cable overhead then theres the getting permission to run it through each persons land or the traffic chaos if they use the roads and given America is more earthquake prone than good old blighty it may not really help if theres a few quakes that rip up the cables underground

i doubt theres any major legal problems shipping the power to the edge of a persons property and they have the choice of over or under and the risks it may entail but thats their choice if every time the wind blows they lose power for a couple of days



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:22 AM
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better yet dont suppress or limit technology that would allow people or communities to have localized sources of power that would be more resistant to storms or other disasters.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:27 AM
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I have been saying this for years.

When one speaks of costs, I like to think about how much it costs the power companies to run several hundred employees on overtime to fix the downed power lines.

I feel that cost is just an excuse, they just do not want to eat at the profits of today to prevent this happening tomorrow. So they will keep sending out the crews at 2:00 am to fix the problems, instead of taking a zoned or pratical approach to finding a solution.

It is definitely cave man style to have the power lines in the air


snf
edit on 4-7-2012 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 
You are correct. When there is a major outage, not only do they pay overtime for their local crews but also scramble thousands of crews from all parts of the country to assist.

It's like putting a Bandaid on a severed artery.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:41 AM
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The biggest threat to our electrical grid is a massive solar flare, or weaponized nuclear EMP.

In both instances we could expect power outages for months or longer, coupled with a failure
of electronic devices, communication devices. cell phones, satellites...anything that is not shielded.

It would be the perfect scenario to implement martial law, as most delivery systems of food and
water and medical supplies would instantly cease to operate. There could be hundreds of local
fires at points where electrical wiring heats up. In the last major flare railroad tracks were
melted...

I hope I'm not giving TPTB ideas, but I doubt it....



BTW...we a bit overdue for another big solar flare.
Funny things is....200 years ago the only harm a flare of this magnitude would have created
is a genuine disappointment in those who happened to miss the auroral light show at night.
Nowadays, millions will die of exposure, and fire and accident

ETA...if you have an old vehicle without electronics that would instantly fry....it will be worth
ten times or more what it is worth now....IF you can keep from being car-jacked that is...
edit on 4-7-2012 by rival because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 


Do you have any ideas how much the costs are to bury thousands of miles of cable?


or society can learn to deal with a minor inconveinance now and then.

And what do you do about cities who don't have the geology to bury cable, like Phoenix?



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by rival
 
That's things that can not be avoided. This can be avoided for the here and now.

Cell phones, GPS and Satellite TV we can live without, food and water we can't.

People think, oh no problem we live out in the woods and can hunt, but when 315 million people flood out of the cities to hunt and fish, being only 3.79 million square miles of land, do the math. It will be a blood bath.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 
Murdering people for gasoline is a minor inconvenience?

The only thing stopping chaos is it has only been a localized problem.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 12:04 PM
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I even have a problem with 480 being buried. Too many idiots dig with out knowing what is underneath them.

The technology is available with fuel cells and the like to start setting up residential power stations, or block power stations. This would allow the eventual removal of high tension lines, as well as do away with large black outs due to our antiquated power grid.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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Why not get rid of the cables all together and go with Tesla's wireless power transmission idea? Even if it was only a fraction of what he envisioned, we'd be better off. We could have buried residential lines but wireless energy over longer distances.

Of course the issue is that the utilities don't want to give out their product for free...



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 12:06 PM
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In Britain, electric cables in towns and cities are usually underground - it's only remoter rural areas that sometimes suffer power cuts due to downed lines after a storm.

Always wondered why the US has so many above ground, especially given that they seem more susceptible to bad storms and hence widespread power cuts.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 12:30 PM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 





And what do you do about cities who don't have the geology to bury cable, like Phoenix?


I believe I stated "a practical solution to the problems". Does Phoenix have multiple tornadoes, hurricanes, and other weather disasters that are detrimental to suspended power lines?

The areas that are prone to power interuptions such as weather related areas should find another alternative means of delivering the power than through the air.

Obviously if one cannot dig through the ground then, well they can't.

I guess from the tone of your post that you enjoy getting ripped off by the utility companies for services that they cannot offer in times of need, like after a severe storm or other natural disasters.

When they are making record profits one should not stick up for them with the same old, "do you know how much burying 1,000's of miles of cable would cost" argument. Do you know how much that they spend on overtime every year fixing the power lines that they just fixed?

I mean sometimes around here they will fix the lines and then a month or two later thay will be out fixing the same line again because of a storm blowing a tree or limb down.

How much does it cost in the loing run refixing the same old system. I bet that it would pay for another means of transmitting the power, even if they do it slowly, sections at a time. Nobody said that they have to do it all in one year.

.


edit on 4-7-2012 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 12:38 PM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 
I agree with you. I should have been more clear. I know it is not practical to bury every inch of high tension or ariel cable but to do where it counts.

The West does not have the extent of the problems that the East does with fallen trees. Less trees= less broken cables.

Geology or practicality permitting, do it!



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 12:53 PM
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Okay then, here's a practical solution with some merit...

How about instead of mandating health care, we mandate solar power devices on all new construction,
government funded/assisted solar power panels for existing homes, and wind power and water-well
construction for all new rural construction. It wouldn't fix the entire problem, but it would help...
wouldn't hurt the economy either



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by timewalker
 


I agree 100%. Just had two and a half days of no power plus high temps and humidity. A buddy of mine lives a few towns over that has the lines below ground and almost never loses power. When it does go out, it lasts maybe a couple of hours. Either bury the lines or trim all trees near power lines
.


XL5

posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 01:13 PM
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The problem with burying HV cable is that when it has a problem its going to take ALOT longer to fix, then again, HV cable is not buried for a reason. HV has a way of turning insulating oil into goo and then into conductive carbon. The ozone HV line throw off can react with most insulators and the ones that are not reactive, are very expensive. They would need to have tunnels you can walk through without getting your head zapped, otherwise, they would need to rip up the ground each time to fix the cable after the find the problem they can't see.

If the govt. wanted to make it more reliable, they would just cut any and all trees near the powerlines as its cheaper.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by rival
 
Sounds good!

See the problem is people at large think practical but TPTB only see opportunity in crisis. Instead of preemptive solutions they keep it limping along and milk it for all it's worth. I don't see how the nimwits cant understand that solutions would be far more profitable and productive for all.


edit on 4-7-2012 by timewalker because: (no reason given)




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