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Higgs live feed

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posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 02:50 AM
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Not really a thread for discussion but I thought people would like to see the live feed of the announcement:

webcast.web.cern.ch...

Peace out!




posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 02:59 AM
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Awesome, thanks, i wasn't sure if the conference was going ahead, of if it was empty talk, great stuff


Namaste



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:00 AM
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They have already said in the first part that its 4.9 sigma...






posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:03 AM
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BTW prof brian cox (wonders of the solar system) is tweeting along with the feed if your having a hard time (like me) keeping up with it..

brian cox twitter
edit on 4-7-2012 by roughycannon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:11 AM
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tweets from brian cox




And combined - 5 sigma. Round of applause. That's a discovery of a Higgs - like particle at CMS. They thank LHC for the data!




5 sigma is the usual particle physics threshold for discovery. It roughly means that you're 99.9999% sure




All channels combined, sensitivity is 4.9 sigma. All results are consistent.




In simple language, CMS have discovered a new boson, and it behaves like the Standard Model Higgs


brian cox twitter
edit on 4-7-2012 by roughycannon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:21 AM
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And for those wondering if this is the definitive announcement that they have found it or not, here is the short answer.

www.havewefoundthehiggsyet.com...



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:26 AM
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If anyone is watching right now... are you as confused as I am? lol

That's one smart woman!



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:29 AM
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reply to post by roughycannon
 


All I need now is someone to decipher his tweets that are helping others understand what they're talking about!

Oo



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:37 AM
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The thing that gets me about all this research costing ungodly amounts of money:

WTH can it be used for? What is the benefit of knowing that these Higgs-Boson particles exist?

Please ATS, enlighten me as to how this will improve science, VS THE COST! Thank you!



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:42 AM
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reply to post by InFriNiTee
 


Understanding a fundemental aspect of the universe we live in... for the cost of 2 days at war. Sounds cheap to me.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:44 AM
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reply to post by InFriNiTee
 

Are you kidding? This information is priceless. We putting the pieces together of how it all began. What more could you ask for?



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:57 AM
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I read in another thread there are lots of things this proof can help with. Things like nuclear fusion, and the idea of how it "all began and fits together."

I'm just looking for some real world examples of how this will improve science in the real world. What will they be able to do that they haven't yet (or what will be improved with this knowledge)? Please provide a few specific examples, as it is something I'd like to understand better.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 03:58 AM
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reply to post by acmpnsfal
 


Is it possible to predict real world applications that could come from this discovery? Probably not, I guess no one could've envisioned the iPhone 100 years ago but still...I just wonder if this will down the road revolutionise everything in not just the science world but the average joe's world too.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 04:04 AM
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From Wikipedia:

see this link for more info.


Cost Main article: List of megaprojects With a budget of 7.5 billion euros (approx. $9bn or £6.19bn as of Jun 2010), the LHC is one of the most expensive scientific instruments[73] ever built.[74] The total cost of the project is expected to be of the order of 4.6bn Swiss francs (approx. $4.4bn, €3.1bn, or £2.8bn as of Jan 2010) for the accelerator and SFr 1.16bn (approx. $1.1bn, €0.8bn, or £0.7bn as of Jan 2010) for the CERN contribution to the experiments.[75]


For that cost as of 2010, I hope it makes a BIG difference to science that justifies it.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 04:30 AM
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reply to post by shadowland8
 

That is definitely possible, I mean our understanding of physics revolutionized computers, so its possible this could lead to technological advancement in the future. I was just saying that even if it did not, I don't think you can put a price on learning something like this.

edit on 4-7-2012 by acmpnsfal because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 04:39 AM
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While 5 sigma is evidence, isn't it something like 12 sigma which is irrefutable evidence or definitive evidence or something like that?



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 04:44 AM
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reply to post by InFriNiTee
 

Heres a link for you, if it werent for CERN we wouldn't be having this exchange. Read Up



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 04:55 AM
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I found this from news.com.au:

THE practical benefits of the "God particle" are difficult for physicists to explain because they are potentially so far reaching.


The global scientific community is abuzz about the 30-year search for the Higgs boson or the God particle, a theoretical particle that is key to the scientific understanding of all matter.


1. One benefit is that the scientists now have the "key" of understanding all matter.


"What we hope is to fix now the understanding of the standard model of physics which is the basis of many applications, many things which we actually see in all day life." The results of the research being done near Geneva could help scientists probe other mysteries of the universe such as the nature of dark matter. "Of course you never could predict what happens later on," Dr Jenni said.


2. So even though they have the "key", it's at this time unknown what benefits will be gotten with this knowledge-but assuredly there will be many things they find.

I hope for one thing they can discover some way to decontaminate large amounts of nuclear waste.

I wonder what they'll use the LHC for now?



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 05:09 AM
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Originally posted by acmpnsfal
reply to post by InFriNiTee
 

Heres a link for you, if it werent for CERN we wouldn't be having this exchange. Read Up


Thank you for that article! I read the linked info, and discovered that we have the world wide web thanks to a Tim Berners-Lee, a graduate from Oxford University with 1st class Honors in Physics, who invented the World Wide Web at CERN in 1990.

I'll have to agree that this piece of data they've found is very useful, I just hope they use it to make the world a better place.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 05:10 AM
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reply to post by InFriNiTee
 

Lol, okay. You just want to be difficult.You won't be content with whatever answer I give you.Whatever benefits come from this will not be known this second, thus is the nature of science. I mean some random scientist in any field could by intent or accident stumble upon the cure for any number of ills in this world. But you would have all science halted and im guessing not funded because the world is not perfect. Go sit under a tree in a park and be apathetic about the state of the world. Im going to enjoy this great moment.



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