You tell me.

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posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by Uncinus
 




It's nothing new.


Yes, I agree with you. You've posted nothing new. There is nothing in your post or link which explains the extreme southern extent of the aurora in the years that I cited. There's nothing to explain why northern Californians thought they were seeing UFO's which were then attributed to Aurora Borealis without any real solar event of a size and direction that could have caused it.

There is no explanation unless HAARP is factored in. And per my previous links, which I'm now tired of re-posting, HAARP is capable of creating naked eye aurorae. Although, it seems, not perfect ones, particularly if people are mistaking them for UFO's.




posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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Originally posted by luxordelphi
reply to post by Uncinus
 




It's nothing new.


Yes, I agree with you. You've posted nothing new. There is nothing in your post or link which explains the extreme southern extent of the aurora in the years that I cited. There's nothing to explain why northern Californians thought they were seeing UFO's which were then attributed to Aurora Borealis without any real solar event of a size and direction that could have caused it.

There is no explanation unless HAARP is factored in. And per my previous links, which I'm now tired of re-posting, HAARP is capable of creating naked eye aurorae. Although, it seems, not perfect ones, particularly if people are mistaking them for UFO's.


But there IS an explanation. They were during times of high solar activity. The list I posted shows the exact same type of thing going back 150 years. The exerpts you posted all come from articles that explain the solar conditions. Like you posted:


November 10, 1991 | From Associated Press One of the most spectacular displays of northern lights in years awed sky gazers from Ohio to Utah and as far south as Texas, where solar particles fueled curtains, ripples and clouds of night brightness.


But you left off this from the same article:
articles.latimes.com...

The sun is now at one of its peak periods of activity, which occur every 11 years, said David Schramm, professor of astronomy and physics at the University of Chicago.

"Now, because we're at a sunspot maximum, the sun is having all sorts of explosions," he said Saturday.

Each explosion has the power of at least 1,000 hydrogen bombs and throws out clouds of particles that travel to the Earth in about 24 hours, said John A. Simpson, a University of Chicago physics professor.


Then you offered this as evidence

November 16, 2004 The Northern Lights viewing zone extended as far south as Alabama last week when solar particles erupted from an extra-large sunspot and collided with atoms in Earth's upper atmosphere.


When it says RIGHT THERE what caused the display.





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