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First photo of atom's shadow at Griffith University

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posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 10:38 AM
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First photo of atom's shadow at Griffith University


www.news.com.au< br />

But the seemingly bland image, taken by scientists at Queensland's Griffith University, could potentially revolutionise mankind's understanding of physics and how the world works.

A research team at the university's centre for quantum dynamics in Brisbane has been able to photograph the shadow of a single atom for the first time.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 10:38 AM
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I find this absolutely fascinating, by taking a photo of the shadow, they can determine how much light is absorbed by a single atom. This definitely can introduce a new world of ideas to physics.

The article states some first ideas for its application, what other ideas do you think we can do by knowing this new found knowledge?

www.news.com.au< br /> (visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 12/7/3 by Im a Marty because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 10:44 AM
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Where is the photo? I looked and there is no photo. Can you link it please.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by emberscott
 


I been searching too to be honest, this is the only news story I found of it, and I'm not sure they're going to produce it for some reason.... sorry



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:00 AM
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Piccies are at the Nature page itself:
Link here...

Keep your eye out for the journal in your local newsagents. The best images will be in that. I should add that scientists will always publish journal papers as the primary method of announcing whatever research findings. Rarely do they report stuff to the MSM.

edit on 3-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:05 AM
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reply to post by Im a Marty
 


amazing... what surrounds the atom looks like a mini universe.

Wow. I think I will remember 2012 for a lot of things... major things. that are not the end of the world.. but maybe discovering a whole new one?



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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The atom is a wave and only appears to be a particle if you observe it. There is nothing solid here at all. And what you see is merely slight of hand, in their hands.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:14 AM
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Originally posted by truthinfact
reply to post by Im a Marty
 


amazing... what surrounds the atom looks like a mini universe.


It might resemble one, but what you're actually seeing is interference and activity from the subatomic particles, mainly electrons. The structure is actually far more dispersed and random than your average text book illustrations. The dense black spot is where the electrons are most frequently appearing, and the outer ring is where electrons appear far less frequently. In effect the entire disc is the image of the atom.


The atom is a wave and only appears to be a particle if you observe it. There is nothing solid here at all. And what you see is merely slight of hand, in their hands.

Not quite. In real life it's slightly more complicated than that. In the macro world, which we observe, the net effect is solid matter all around you. Stick your fingers in a 240v socket, and you'll definitely feel the electron activity.
In the quantum world, there are various degrees of 'solidity', depending on the wavelength and energies of whatever quantum waves.
The idea that wave functions 'collapse' because they're observed is only one of several interpretations. It could be the case that our reality branches every time there's a quantum event, and you're merely experiencing one of those multiple universes.
edit on 3-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by Im a Marty
reply to post by emberscott
 


I been searching too to be honest, this is the only news story I found of it, and I'm not sure they're going to produce it for some reason.... sorry


You already linked the picture, it's just that there was an animation added around it and it makes it a tad confusing at first glance.

Look at the orange circle.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 03:02 PM
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reply to post by XeroOne
 


I'm going to go on a limb and give the easiest type of analogy I can think of. Could it be the quantum world is similar to the way we use computers? We know all information is 01s but when it is assembled in machine language it appears as a physical web page (observing) but in reality it is nothing of the sort. So reality is a wave form but once compiled, it takes on a solid characteristics.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 03:07 PM
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Hi thank you for posting, very interesting!

I think these are the images some were referring to:

Nature.com



"We wanted to investigate how few atoms are required to cast a shadow, and we proved it takes just one." Read more: www.news.com.au...



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by FlySolo
reply to post by XeroOne
 


I'm going to go on a limb and give the easiest type of analogy I can think of. Could it be the quantum world is similar to the way we use computers? We know all information is 01s but when it is assembled in machine language it appears as a physical web page (observing) but in reality it is nothing of the sort. So reality is a wave form but once compiled, it takes on a solid characteristics.


A good question. To some extent, yes. It appears the wavelengths are sometimes energy waves are focused into a tiny point, which gives us an apparently 'solid' particle. The exact type of particle is determined by the energy level and wavelength, which is why CERN's trying to find add energy to existing particles by colliding them in order to generate new particles. This is one theory, anyway. I don't think anyone knows exactly what the energy is or where it comes from yet, or why there are different waveforms.

And the above might even be wrong, if the 'single electron theory' is true.
edit on 3-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by XeroOne
 


Never heard of the single electron theory but a quick read about it seems interesting. If true, then no doubt everything is connected. Brings a new meaning to "For ever person you victimize, you victimize yourself"



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 03:49 PM
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Originally posted by FlySolo
reply to post by XeroOne
 


Never heard of the single electron theory but a quick read about it seems interesting. If true, then no doubt everything is connected. Brings a new meaning to "For ever person you victimize, you victimize yourself"


Very interesting theory, which I still can't really get my head around. There's also the 'advance wave' idea (electromagnetic waves being time-symmetric) that ties in with your point about everything being somehow connected.

Link here...
edit on 3-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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huh. very cool marty. science is awesome.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:12 PM
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reply to post by Im a Marty
 


apparently natural rotation is clock-wise, and gravity is in deed sub Atomic.
at least that is what i see.
ohh and possably full of stars



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:21 PM
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Haha what a coincidence...I just made a sale to Griffith Uni after chasing them for months.

Maybe this discovery has bolstered their capital and they can trade with lowly sods like me now



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 12:23 AM
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Originally posted by BobAthome
reply to post by Im a Marty
 


apparently natural rotation is clock-wise, and gravity is in deed sub Atomic.
at least that is what i see.
ohh and possably full of stars


There is no natural rotation direction. For anything rotating clockwise or counter clockwise, an observer can reverse it by merely changing the viewing location.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by Im a Marty
 


I live a short drive away from Grifith Uni, its good to see them making world discoveries such as this.
S@F



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 



You are right. It was right there the whole time.



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