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Physicists Produce Highest Man-Made Temperature: 7 trillion degrees

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posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 08:47 AM
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Physicists produce highest man-made temperature: 7 trillion degrees



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Physicists at the Brookhaven National Laboratory have smashed gold ions together to produce a quark-gluon plasma like that which existed in the first instant after the Big Bang that created the universe, and in doing so have produced what Guinness World Records says is the highest man-made temperature ever, 7.2 trillion degrees. That is about 250,000 times hotter than the temperature at the core of the sun.


It seems as though scientists are starting to find more and more things with these colliders. I can't even wrap my mind around how hot that is. I highly doubt you could create something that could harness that much heat without being destroyed.

Oh...and it seems as though the record won't last for long. It appears the scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have been to an even higher temperature than that of the Brookhaven lab above.


The record certainly won't last long, however. Physicists at the Large Hadron Collider in Europe have produced a plasma with an energy density three times higher than that produced at RHIC, which should translate into a 30% higher temperature. They have not, however, announced what the measured temperature actually is.


Amazing stuff indeed!!
edit on 3-7-2012 by iamhobo because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 08:53 AM
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yeah amazing! I think hell is now in earth

edit on 3-7-2012 by antioligarchs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by iamhobo
 


I just do not understand how this is possible! (not questioning the validity, rather i am showing my stupidity!). When we are incapable of getting anything close the Sun because of the heat, how the hell do we build something that is hotter? To my simple mind, surely it would "melt" through whatever was containing it?


Please help an older idiot to understand this!



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


I think it's because the energy is measured in like a fraction of a millisecond. It's happens so fast it's like nothing even happened lol.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:10 AM
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reply to post by iamhobo
 


Nope, sorry, must be having a stupid day but i still don't get it! Surely if it was even for a milli second, it would still melt through because of the intense heat?

Thanks for trying to explain it to me though. I'm off to the corner now with my little dunce hat on.........



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:12 AM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


This is an extreme heat in value, indeed. However, it is an extremely small quantity of heat, of energy in a way, because it involves an extremely small mass, we're talking of a few ions. This much energy is not enough to melt a gram of iron. It lasts for just a few nanoseconds, maybe even less.

To compare it, it's like you would talk of a drop of liquid iron to the south pole icecap. It sure is hot, but it's comparatively to its neighborhood insignificant.

As to why we cannot "reach the sun", that's exactly because of the contrary: it is an enormous mass, with an amazing quantity of energy, by very far much much more than these few ions of gold that created such a temperature...
edit on 3-7-2012 by SpookyVince because: added emphase.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by SpookyVince
 


Brilliant, that actually makes a lot of sense now.

Thanks very much



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:15 AM
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AND THERE IT IS!!!!
AN ARTIFICIAL STAR!!!!!


Give My Regards to Doctor Octopus



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:16 AM
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Why? That is the question.

Probably spent 7.2 trillion dollars to do it.


edit on 3-7-2012 by timewalker because: currency conversion



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:16 AM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


Don't feel bad, I have a hard time trying to envision what type of device could measure that temperature...

I think they must rather calculate it based on excitement of particles or something.
edit on 7/3/2012 by wtbengineer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:24 AM
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Lol, 7.2 trillion degrees. Does that mean that it's possible to create temperatures of - trillions of degrees?



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:28 AM
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reply to post by iamhobo
 


Very interesting find. Sometimes I wonder can this heat/light signature no matter how fast ect. be seen by something ELSEWHERE.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:32 AM
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Originally posted by wtbengineer
I think they must rather calculate it based on excitement of particles or something.


On very small scales (atoms, ions, etc.), that's one way of doing it. Temperature is a measure of the average energy level of the particles in a substance. Measuring (or determining) the energies involved in the reaction allows to derive the temperature.

On very high scales (stars, gas clouds in the galaxy, etc.), it can be done using another technique: assume the object is a blackbody and derive its temperature from the wavelengths (colors, in particular, but also IR or X-ray) of its spectrum.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by timewalker
 
Here you go.....



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:42 AM
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Originally posted by Swamper
Lol, 7.2 trillion degrees. Does that mean that it's possible to create temperatures of - trillions of degrees?


More importantly, does this mean we can now get an awesome tan in less than a second?



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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Originally posted by Swamper
Lol, 7.2 trillion degrees. Does that mean that it's possible to create temperatures of - trillions of degrees?


Nope. Because at the absolute zero (which is -459.67 °F, -273.15 °C or actually 0 K) all atom based movement stops, which means that there is "no more temperature". It can't go below that.

Ironically, that's also the temperature at which Norwegians start to say "Faen it's cold out there!"



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by iamhobo
 




Physicists produce highest man-made temperature: 7 trillion degrees


WHY?



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


That's part of the normal process of research: they are trying to get a view of how where things at or just after the big bang. This is in order to try and understand better our own universe.

If humankind had stopped doing research, we'd still be living in caves and hunting wild beasts for our food.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by Atzil321
 
Thanks Bill Nye. Is that really how things come to the commercial market? Wow!

I'll be looking for my 7.2 trillion degree cigarette lighter or trash incinerator soon.




posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by SpookyVince
 


I understand.




If humankind had stopped doing research, we'd still be living in caves and hunting wild beasts for our food.


Sounds good.



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