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Found a watch battery in my phone connected to the mic.

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posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by Romekje
reply to post by Infi8nity
 


Actually i think the way you describe it another poster was more accurate.

Probably just a battery to keep the clock/memory the way it should be when you disconnect your main battery, like on a pc mainboard.


Time is provided by connection. If you move states the clock will change.




posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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Originally posted by clay2 baraka

Originally posted by Infi8nity
I have a old verizon phone. I had heard about how the Government can can spy on you threw your phone by activating the microphone even when the phone is off. Now I wonder if they can do it when the phone does not have a battery in it. So I opened it up and found a watch battery wired to the microphone. Probably so they can listen to you while your phone does not have a battery in it. Its public knowledge that the Goverment can listen to you threw your microphone but because its public knowledge but its kind of useless because you can just take the battery out of your phone. Unless they plant a extra battery. I bet on newer phones they do not even look like battery's, its probably apart of the board.


With some phones if your battery dies, their is a code you can enter to get a little extra life out of it. I wonder if it gets this extra energy from the phones main battery or the battery concealed inside of the phone.
edit on 2-7-2012 by Infi8nity because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-7-2012 by Infi8nity because: (no reason given)


Why would they go to all of the trouble of infiltrating your home and disassembling your phone when they can just spy on you using snooping software at the switch.

Digital transmissions have completely changed the snooping game. I think you are misidentifying the purpose of the battery..


What do you mean digital transmissions? Snooping software? So a computer or a phone does not need to be around in order to use this softweare?



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


Not everybody lives in the USA, we dont have a time carrier in our signal and have to set it manually, but then again my country only has 1 timezone.

Also it depends on your phone and what network you use.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


I am looking at it right now and its connected to the main board, hanging off some wires. The mic is connected to the main board hanging off some wires as well.

Thats a bug. "Wires" are the tell. Cell phones use circuit boards, not wires. If it is hooked to the mike then it is transmitting regardless if the phone is off or on. Since the watch battery has limited power, it will be somewhere verrrry close. Look out side for a panel truck or windowless van parked outside. Or another transceiver somewhere in the house. In the walls in an outlet or attached outside to other phone or cable equipment boxes(inside the J-Box).. Get an EMF detector (like ghost hunters use) and sweep the house. Also test your phone by removing main battery and sweep it. If a signal is detected...whoops.

Did you recently have your phone repaired or was it "missing" from where you thought you left it, or do you leave it at home sometimes?

You can also look for other wires leading away from the house along the roof under the eaves, in the gutters, or twisted around other wires leading away from the house. Look under the house in the crawl space for "dangling" wires also. Since your phone is "wireless" they used a battery there. If bugs are in light fixtures or wall outlets or lamps on tables, etc, then they use "hard wires" to lead away from passive microphones (no signal to detect).



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 10:33 PM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity

Originally posted by rangerdanger
Was wired directly to the receiver? Or was it just on the circuit? Open your computer, and there is a small battery in it. It's not powerful enough to do much besides provide a slight amount of power to save your Wi-Fi passwords, etc. How do you think it saves information during a sudden loss of power? Just take it out, and if you can live with it, problem solved. My guess is the phone won't work right without it.
Unless you bought the most expensive phone ever, I doubt it came with experimental government batteries.
edit on 2-7-2012 by rangerdanger because: Spelling and grammar.



Your phone will not lose your information if their is no power. Your computer uses a battery to keep time, has nothing to do with wifi passwords or remembering data. Your wifi password is stored in your router.
edit on 2-7-2012 by Infi8nity because: (no reason given)


Actually, it's called a CMOS battery. It keeps the information in the CMOS from being lost as the CMOS requires power to not lose data (it is flash memory and is wiped when all power is lost). It stores a variety of startup settings for your computer such as boot drive order, the board's clock, It also allows you to modify certain chip settings that can overclock/underclock the processor.

I imagine that it server a similar function in the phone, ensuring that the CMOS does not lose necessary boot settings/information. Your phone is essentially a small computer, running an operating system of some sort (ie, iOS, Android, Windows CE, etc).



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 11:13 PM
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Either it's the cmos battery, or it is an older style vibration mode motor. A lot of phones have a warm sleep mode that makes them able to detect networks when off, but not with the battery dissoconnected. It is possible they may have a supercapacitor or reserve battery installed, but it is for data retention of dynamic data such as the time and transmit mode if you change the main battery. Some like the I phones cannot have the battery removed easily. Owning a cell phone is basically signing a waiver that says: I accept to use this phone, and concent tpo be analyzed, screened, and catagorized. Oh BTW Don't worry they are listening to your every word... ELENIN was a word that got immediate attention to a data screening center FWIW.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 01:36 AM
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I'm more curious to find out why you, in some non-US nation-state with a single time zone and antiquated telecom system, were messing around with an old mobile phone (just the kind a bomb-maker would seek out when creating an IED/VBIED/remote det "suicide" vest like "they" use to take the cold-feet variable out of man-portable explosive devices). But i guess my parenthetical comment gave away where my train of thought on that matter is headed...



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 03:39 AM
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Most phones these days leave very little room to play with inside. Id be very suprised to find space in my phone for an extra small battery the phone is so streamlined inside even putting it back together slightly wrong is totally noticable. Is there a way you can show us how it is connected or the make and model and the location its placed with the areas its connected to?



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 03:42 AM
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As a poster stated above it is most likely a vibration module. These sometimes look like a small watch battery and usually have 2 wires coming from them, mostly red and blue. These wires will be either soldered to the motherboard or will be connected to a plug for easier replacement.

Here take a look at a couple of designs.







Your vibration module may also look like a miniature motor with what looks like half a fly-wheel attached to the shaft to throw it off balance. Like this:



If this is the case your mystery part will be something akin to a cmos battery. To power active memory when the phone is shut down.

Hope that helps.

edit on 3/7/2012 by Grifter81 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 03:55 AM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity
Its public knowledge that the Goverment can listen to you threw your microphone


No, it isn't nor is it even true, just paranoid dillusions.

Now, it would be interesting to see a picture of precisely where and to what this battery was connected too. Then we can tell you what it is for.


Originally posted by rangerdanger
Open your computer, and there is a small battery in it. It's not powerful enough to do much besides provide a slight amount of power to save your Wi-Fi passwords, etc. How do you think it saves information during a sudden loss of power?


If your talking about the small battery found on every motherboard, no, it doesn't save your wifi passwords at all. It is for timing (keeps the internal clock ticking over) and enables the CMOS to retain its information for the POST when you turn on your computer. Wifi logon details are stored within Windows (or your chose OS), not in the BIOS.


Originally posted by rangerdanger
Just take it out, and if you can live with it, problem solved. My guess is the phone won't work right without it.


No, it will probably not work properly, otherwise it wouldn't be in there! Same with the PC one, don't take it out, it is supposed to be there.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:03 AM
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It is more than likely the vibration motor as another poster pointed out. Mobile phones generally don't use CMOS batteries, the store enough of a charge to keep the info for a little while, although not forever. Nokias were a pain in the arse for this, everytime the main battery was removed it lost all date/time settings.

Mobile phones don't use a BIOS in the same fashion as a PC, only the date/time can really be changed whereas a PC BIOS needs to save a lot more information like software clock settings, hardware settings (IRQ etc) and a host of other settings.

(for the record, there was a handful of older mobile phones which did use an internal battery to retain EPROM settings)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:01 AM
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Grab your foil hat and look at the wire that is running from the back of your tv going to the wall, they are watching you, watching them, watching you. Unplug immeadiately and call Ghost Busters.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:48 AM
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Originally posted by Cuervo

Originally posted by phantomjack
OP,

Can you please give a bit more information on the phone type?

There are those of us that were born BEFORE the age of the Cell phone, so is this a landline phone? Cell Phone? What is it?

Yes, there was an era BEFORE the word "Verizon" existed to mean "cellular" ... They actually made landline phones.

And believe it or not, there used to exist phones that actually had to plug into a wall!!!


You realize people are going to assume you plugged it into the wall just to charge it, right? Don't worry, I'm with you. I still remember my rotary-dialing phone (and I'm only in my early 30's, hah!).


LOL, yes. I realized that after I posted it. But, I figured...what the heck.

And, most have never seen the plugs BEFORE RJ-11 style connectors!

I remember my mother having to buy an extended cord so she could reach the bedroom with the kitchen phone.

I showed my 15 YO son a Rotary style phone and he had NO IDEA how to dial it.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:50 AM
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Originally posted by phroziac

Originally posted by rangerdanger
Was wired directly to the receiver? Or was it just on the circuit? Open your computer, and there is a small battery in it. It's not powerful enough to do much besides provide a slight amount of power to save your Wi-Fi passwords, etc. How do you think it saves information during a sudden loss of power? Just take it out, and if you can live with it, problem solved. My guess is the phone won't work right without it.
Unless you bought the most expensive phone ever, I doubt it came with experimental government batteries.
edit on 2-7-2012 by rangerdanger because: Spelling and grammar.


Lol wifi passwords? Thats on the harddrive dude. Youre overestimating that battery. It saves cmos startup information, thats it. Basically the computers clock and the startup password as soon as power is turned on, and what disk drives you have. You can also overclock in that menu.


Yeh that made me laugh too.

I suspect the battery OP found is doing the same job as the Bios battery does in the PC, it preserves start up data and the time.

OP if you take the main battery out for 5 minutes then put it back in does the phone still have the correct time? If so then its that little battery that enabled it to keep the correct time.

Just a thought. Some small capacitive microphones use a very small voltage(battery) to increase the sensitivity.
Also these days that battery will have been replaced with a capacitor.


Also. Somebody mentioned a code to get more power from the battery. The new LiPoly battery's do not like to go below a certain charge/voltage, it can destroy them, and sometimes even cause them to ignite, therefore the circuitry turns the phone off before that happens. By using the code to get more power you risk either buying a new battery or new phone.


edit on 3-7-2012 by VoidHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 12:47 PM
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Seems strange and unlikely to me, but then again I don't entirely disbelieve someone doing such a thing. I can imagine the messed up things they hear from us though! I have four boys, plus my hubby.. conversations get strange around this house. LOL



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