Asian Neanderthals, Humans Mated 100,000 years ago

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posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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You're missing the point entirely. If the DNA exists in the populations that those mummies originate from that is evidence enough...and they are clearly ascribed to haplogroups, so we can check those without having to retest the mummies. It is unnecessary. They all belong to different groups and were not, for the most part inter-related, that should clearly indicate to you that they arrived in the region they died seperately and independently, surely you have the capabilities to reason that they would not yield anything of use to your 'theory'. They tell and entirely different story, one not related to migrations tens of thousands of years earlier.

Current research has the Pontic Plain emerging as a major crossroads of cultures during the period preceding the Bronze Age and as such the Tarim mummies 'migration' fits into that shifting landscape of human development and emergent technology, they are in my opinion not relevent to earlier human migrations other than that humans have always moved and as often as not, that route has been East in pursuit, or under guidance of the sun. In that sense the Pontic Steppe is, in my opinion, relevent to the Denisovians movements and to all human migrations as it represents a migratory bridge that their food sources must too have followed.

en.wikipedia.org...

What is equally likely is that while in pursuit of the sun, or whatever else it was that drove them, that climatic change, caused bottle-necks which led by necessity to interbreeding, as well as such aspects as the co-migration of Helicobacter pylori with those leaving East Africa.
edit on 3-7-2012 by Biliverdin because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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A simple way of looking at things that explains the current lack of complete data for a complete picture is this.

Imagine a punnet square for genetics.

For now we have a few samples of DNA to compare to current populations, like HSS, HSN, HSD etc. In a square this would give the results there are of the 4% HSN in certain polulations and 6% HSD in other polulations. Then there is the presumption that for the most HSS is a complete dominant gene on it's own. This is unlikely.

There is every possibility that there are also, as yet unfound samples of other HS?, such as HSA, HSB, HSC... etc that give multitudes of connected DNA that shows for example 50% of Southern Europeans having HSA, 80% of Asians having HSJ, etc etc.

Only when there is more complete evidence should any definite hypothesis be proposed as until then it is mostly speculative.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 10:22 AM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


Very possible we just haven't sampled enough, we know of three cousins who made it up to nearly modern times, As we search we may find more.



posted on Aug, 31 2012 @ 10:13 AM
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Report on recent Denisovan DNA

www.bbc.co.uk...



The DNA of a cave girl who lived about 80,000 years ago has been analysed in remarkable detail. The picture of her genome is as accurate as that of modern day human genomes, and shows she had brown eyes, hair and skin. The research in Science also sheds new light on the genetic differences between modern humans and their closest extinct relatives. The cave dweller, a Denisovan, was a cousin of the Neanderthals. Both groups of ancient humans died out about 30,000 years ago, but have left their mark in the gene pool of modern people.




The Denisovans have mysterious origins. They appear to have left little behind for palaeontologists save a tiny finger bone and a wisdom tooth found in Siberia's Denisova cave in 2010. Though some researchers have proposed a possible link between the Denisovans and human fossils from China that have previously been difficult to classify. A Russian scientist sent a fragment of the bone from Siberia to a team led by Svante Paabo at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. He thought it might belong to an early modern human, but the results came as a surprise. DNA analysis revealed a human who was neither a Neanderthal nor a modern human but the first of a new group of ancient humans.




The most detailed genetic analysis yet of the Denisovans also confirms that they bred with the ancestors of some people alive today, the researchers said. It shows that about 3% of the genomes of people living today in Papua New Guinea come from Denisovans, with a trace of their DNA lingering in the Han and Dai people from mainland China. The genetic variation of Denisovans was very low, suggesting that although they were found in large parts of Asia their population remained small.



posted on Aug, 31 2012 @ 10:32 AM
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I'm thinking that all (non-african) humans have some degree of DNA from at least one other species, correct?

So some would have more than others, and some would have more pronounced deviations from HSS. Perhaps this could help to explain some of the eccentricities, and even brilliance in some individuals? On the other end, maybe not so successful couplings of various species DNA results in more severe forms of autism, or other diseases.

It would seem interbreeding would provide a wider range of diversity, with the majority of negative deviations breeding out in the short run, but some still remaining. Maybe a specific gene that by itself is negative, becomes a positive if it's expressed in combination with other quirky genes...



posted on Aug, 31 2012 @ 11:07 AM
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Originally posted by moniesisfun
I'm thinking that all (non-african) humans have some degree of DNA from at least one other species, correct?

So some would have more than others, and some would have more pronounced deviations from HSS. Perhaps this could help to explain some of the eccentricities, and even brilliance in some individuals? On the other end, maybe not so successful couplings of various species DNA results in more severe forms of autism, or other diseases.

It would seem interbreeding would provide a wider range of diversity, with the majority of negative deviations breeding out in the short run, but some still remaining. Maybe a specific gene that by itself is negative, becomes a positive if it's expressed in combination with other quirky genes...


Very possibly.

It would be so great to have complete genome traits, geographical mapping and interactions of various HSS X HS?.

There are so many advances in science that could be made, like breeding out illnesses etc, creating super intelligence etc. I guess the morality would have to be kept good, but so many possibilities that are hopefully being realised by faculty interactions.



posted on Aug, 31 2012 @ 11:14 AM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth

There are so many advances in science that could be made, like breeding out illnesses etc, creating super intelligence etc. I guess the morality would have to be kept good, but so many possibilities that are hopefully being realised by faculty interactions.



Screw the morality, that's entirely relative. I say let's do it already. Was talking two days ago with an elite about dysgenics....something must be done.



posted on Aug, 31 2012 @ 11:17 AM
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Originally posted by moniesisfun

Originally posted by theabsolutetruth

There are so many advances in science that could be made, like breeding out illnesses etc, creating super intelligence etc. I guess the morality would have to be kept good, but so many possibilities that are hopefully being realised by faculty interactions.



Screw the morality, that's entirely relative. I say let's do it already. Was talking two days ago with an elite about dysgenics....something must be done.


I guess I mean intelligent morality, we wouldn't want unscrupulous groups creating super bad, reactionary types.





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