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Stink bug crisis reaches 38 states, Pacific Coast

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posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by doobydoll
reply to post by getreadyalready
 

Did a gorilla stay in the same spot for too long that Kudzu covered him?






See! You can't afford to get caught napping around this stuff.




posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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The scarey part about the asian stinkbugs, aka the marmoted stinkbug (NOT To be confused with your local species) is they have only been on board since 2001 and in only in 14 states.

In just 11 years they have spread and multiplied that much.

the other asian invasion causing huge concern, the deceivingly pretty Japanese rose, that is choking out native wild plants including plenty of the berry bearing raspberries and blackberries that birds need to survive.



posted on Jul, 5 2012 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 


Wow! That stuff is no joke.
You could weaponize that kind of thing... if you were evil.



posted on Jul, 6 2012 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by antar
 
I know one of my neighbor used that technique to get rid of 'ants' and other insects. However the backyard would always smell like one big leftover salad container with all that vinegar that she uses..atleast for a day or two



edit on 6-7-2012 by hp1229 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2012 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


I am glad you responded to me, kind of lost track of this thread but went out the next day after I posted and low and behold my zucks were eaten by stink bugs, big ones! Also Grasshoppers are eating everything! Even the marigolds I planted to keep them away! Its crazy!



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by antar
 

I just read home remedies to remove or prevent stink bugs and realized that I have a lush flourishment of MINT leaves plant around the garden area. I guess thats what prevented my plants this season? Who knows.

Home_Remedies_For_Stink_Bugs



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by hp1229
I am not suggesting but wondering as per how many other critters were introduced on purpose/accident/unknowingly into a foreign land with negative side effects?


1600's, rats on Dutch trading ships brought with them the Plague killing 100,000 people in London.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


Cool I will make some up this evening!



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Oh wow I didn't realize the fire ants were imported here. Thanks for that interesting tidbit!

I sat on a fire ant mound as a kid and got bit by at least 50 of them. No hospitalization, but it did freak me out, and yea I was swollen up a bit.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 


We have some domestic ones as well. They are native to Texas and the Southwest. They are a lot bigger, and a less aggressive, but still with a nasty bite and sting.

One of the best deterrents for the imported red fire ants is regular old domestic ants. I try to be careful when I'm killing ants in my yard and only get the fire ants.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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Originally posted by hp1229
reply to post by Zaphod58
 
Such has been the case in Okinawa as well from what I have seen in a documentary with respect to 'habu' and the mongoose. The mongoose was brought to the island to control the habu and other venemous snakes in control.



Back in 65 when I was growing up as a child on Okinawa, I used to play in the hills outside our housing. We were always turning up munitions, bones, teeth, rotting web gear, etc. I had been walking through the tall grass and had almost fallen into a pit about five feet deep with some punji sticks in the bottom. I was sitting against a tree and marveling that this pit still existed from WW2 when all of a sudden, a mongoose comes from out of the tall grass and stops in his tracks when he spots me. We look at each other for a while and then he goes on about his business. When I was there, much sport was made of "fights" that pitted mongoose and habu against each other. Every fair, carnival, and festival had a tent where you could go and watch these fights. I cannot imagine any being alive now at the rate they were being captured and killed when I was young.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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So we have a stink bug issue, due to us importing them, and now they are looking for another species to kill the stink bugs to import here.

So don't stop the long line of importation of foreign species, just keep it alive and well.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


You would be surprised how many feral species have been in america, and for how long. I'm curious at what point something can be considered native? Species have obviously been spreading acroos oceans somehow for millions of years. Leave it to us humans to screw that part of nature up too!



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful
Fire ants are a plague here in SC where I live.

Add this to your list: Kudzu



Honey bees are not native to Americas...we need to wipe them out!!!!



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:26 PM
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Originally posted by LeMerde

1600's, rats on Dutch trading ships brought with them the Plague killing 100,000 people in London.



There are 4 billion rats in the world and 7 billion humans...I think we are looking at the wrong species to control...hehe



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by Xtrozero
 


4 billion rats in the world? I think there are 4 billion rats at the St. Louis airport. Where did you get that number?

Apparently 2 billion rats were displaced by a single flood in China?

Source
edit on 9-7-2012 by getreadyalready because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Insects spread especially fast. They have had hundreds of generations of propigation in those 11 years. It really doesn't matter though. The united states hasn't had truely productive harvests in forever. We sell weapons to get by nowadays.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 09:37 PM
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Originally posted by Evolutionsend
reply to post by hp1229
 


You would be surprised how many feral species have been in america, and for how long. I'm curious at what point something can be considered native? Species have obviously been spreading acroos oceans somehow for millions of years. Leave it to us humans to screw that part of nature up too!


Pretty much.

From what i recall, what is considered 'native' is just something that has been there a long time. In N America, that just means 'before white people'. At some point, these invasive species will be 'native', as well. But i think that may take another 1000 years or so.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 
Well many of them do migrate but majority introduced during the modern times are human introducing them to a eco-system.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by groingrinder
 
I'm sure the locals would ensure not to completely wipe out the population just for the sporting aspect of it (legal or illegal). They do use the habu for food and sake



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