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Stink bug crisis reaches 38 states, Pacific Coast

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posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


Maybe this explains why my sister found a stink bug in the kale garnishing her plate at a restaurant a couple weeks ago. But that was in Florida, so maybe not. It does make me wonder... of all the strange things I've seen in food over the years, this was the first stink bug, lol.




posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 


Are you sure? I think we have to import special Kudzu eating sheep to eat the Kudzu. I don't think typical cattle will eat it. Surely goats would eat it, I once knew a goat that ate the bumper off a van.


You're right. According to that article livestock will eat it, but herbicides won't kill it. Some herbicides actually make it grow better. They say you have to close your windows at night in the South to keep from getting overgrown by it, and during the day you can actually watch it grow!



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 05:50 PM
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Don't forget pigeons and sparrows

Both nasty birds that I could so without.

Pigeons and house sparrows were brought over by the Brits to remind them of home.....no offense if I don't send thanks for that.
www.fftimes.com...
www.avianweb.com...



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 05:57 PM
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Chickens and reptiles eat these bugs. They are really nasty on squash, melons, and cucumbers. Maybe if we can get over the smell- extra protien om nom nom....



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 

It is amazing that despite such highly qualified scientists attempting to study a particular species and to proetect another, they end up overlooking several factors. This certainly will not be the last time they introduce species to a foreign land.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by gemineye
 
Well. It is expected to thrive in tropical countries/region so definitely it wont be easy to rid of it down in FL. Other way to compensate the population would be to form farms (if people consume insects such as this one)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by DontTreadOnMe
 


I do know pigeons can be consumed by humans..hell even sparrows. If we commercialize the industry, I bet you they'll disappear



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 08:52 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by stanguilles7
 


Are you sure? I think we have to import special Kudzu eating sheep to eat the Kudzu. I don't think typical cattle will eat it. Surely goats would eat it, I once knew a goat that ate the bumper off a van.


You're right. According to that article livestock will eat it, but herbicides won't kill it. Some herbicides actually make it grow better. They say you have to close your windows at night in the South to keep from getting overgrown by it, and during the day you can actually watch it grow!


You CAN watch it grow, but mainly that's cuz there isn't much else to do there in the summer. Too damn hot.

And no need to use pesticides when animals will eat it. I've actually known a few people who raised goats (and sold the milk) feeding them about 90% kudzu. Free feed!



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by DontTreadOnMe
 


We have either a sparrow or a barn swallow that builds her nest every year on our deck, and we watch it, and we watch the eggs, and we get excited when the babies hatch, only to find them gone the next day or two, and then a snake skin left on the railing a day or two after that.
You'd think the stupid bird would learn. We even put out mothballs this year, but it didn't help. Natural selection I suppose. That little birdy is too stupid to reproduce effectively, so her babies never make it.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:33 PM
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I had no idea. I don't think I've seen a stink bug since I was a child.

2nd.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
This is just wonderful...another Asian hitchhiker with no natural predators...this one damaging apples, peaches and grapes....and this one going after citrus:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Maybe the critter will stay out of Michigan: most of our apple crop in the north was destroyed by the early heat we had in March

Where the heck in michigan do you live that you dont have stink bugs? Theyre all over in st joe! I never realized they had no predators and did damage though. They seem to appear from nowhere



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


A few years ago, on the Big Island, the captured the last three wild Hawaiian Crows, two males and a female. They put them all in a cage for a month or two to get used to each other, figuring that they would release them, and the female would choose a mate, and they would go make a nest. After a couple months in their big cage, they opened the door, and all three flew off in three different directions.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:51 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by hp1229
 
A few years ago, on the Big Island, the captured the last three wild Hawaiian Crows, two males and a female. They put them all in a cage for a month or two to get used to each other, figuring that they would release them, and the female would choose a mate, and they would go make a nest. After a couple months in their big cage, they opened the door, and all three flew off in three different directions.
Hmm...thats strange not sure about the odds but unless somehow they were offsprings from a particular group that doesn't interbreed? Just a thought.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by AFewGoodWomen
reply to post by HappyBunny
 


Just curious...how were the mosquitoes during the stinkbug plague?

$$$


No idea. I was too busy trying to keep the stinkbugs out of my house to notice or care about what the mosquitoes were doing.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


When I see vast expanses of kudzu, I immediately think...wasteland. What a haven for snakes, rats, fire aints and dead bodies. No one walks through kudzu, it will eat you alive...muhahahahaha!!!! But seriously, that stuff has got to go! They should build a prison in the middle of a kudzu and blackberry forest. Blackberry briars are even worse...and it grows everywhere and sticks around for winter. Then...there are these pretty white flowers with intensely painful thistles that you cannot see..if you pick them... you get stung, and the pain is exquisite. My first day living in North Carolina was a nearly deadly one. On that day, I went and picked the white flowers, then I sat on a tree stump,in intense pain, but, I didn't realize that the stump was infested...with fire ants...I was wearing short, shorts, I then ran and jumped into my neighbors freshly shocked swimming pool to get the ants off...the pool water naturally got into my eyes as I dived into the deep end. If that wasn't enough...There was an electrical short in his swimming pool light and the railing to get out the the pool was electrified...only enough to buzz my hand very uncomfortably, no major electrocution, Thank Goodness for that at least. The next day was better...I only received the worst sunburn that one could ever experience without the blessing of death. I really thought that NC was going to kill me one day...I still do.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by AFewGoodWomen
 


Yikes!! That is a rough introduction to the South!

I was once attacked by fireants in my own pool! I was floating and hanging on to the diving board with one hand, and talking to people, and I kept getting this little stinging on my shoulder, and I'd rub it and ignore it until it got too bad, I looked over and it was covered in fire ants, and there was a bridge of fire ants from the poolside over to my shoulder, and a steady line of them up on the concreate across to he grass. I don't know what I did to them, but they sought me out in the pool water! We've been feuding ever since, but they are persistent little bastards!

When I first moved to the south I heard stories of kids being killed by sitting on a fire ant hill. The first story I heard was one similar to yours where a little girl in short shorts sat on a stump, and they didn't bite until they were all inside of her shorts, and when they started biting she couldn't get away.

We have a swamp down here called "Tate's Hell." They even wrote a song about it. There are certainly a lot of things that want to kill you around here.

Can't see this video myself, hope it is the right one.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 01:37 PM
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Speaking of invasive species, have you heard of Hog Weed?


Giant Hogweed is native to central and southwest Asia. It was introduced to the United States as a garden plant. The earliest recording of the plant in the U.S. is 1917, from Highland Park, New York (outside of Rochester).

This noxious plant is now well established in New York State and Pennsylvania, and continues to spread. Giant hogweed can thrive in many habitats. It grows particularly well in areas where the soil has been disturbed, such as on wastelands, riverbanks, roadsides and along railroads. Its size and rapid growth allow it to quickly dominate an area, if the conditions are right.

Caution must be used if you encounter this plant. It poses a serious health threat to those who come in physical contact with it. The sap, when combined with moisture and sunlight, can cause severe skin and eye irritation, blistering of the skin, scarring and even blindness. If you come in contact with this plant, seek immediate care from a physician. Do NOT attempt to eradicate it on your own. The removal or treatment of this plant should be done with extreme care.


www.ny.nrcs.usda.gov...




posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


They have eaten an entire plant from the inside out in one night here in mo.

This happens every year if you dont stop them, they have always been thick.

They line up and hump each other sometimes 20 or 30 in a row.

I just put them on a blender with baking soda and vinegar and pour it back on the plants, they leave in a hurry.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by antar
 



They line up and hump each other sometimes 20 or 30 in a row.


No wonder they keep coming back! That is a hell of a party.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 

Did a gorilla stay in the same spot for too long that Kudzu covered him?







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