It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Stink bug crisis reaches 38 states, Pacific Coast

page: 1
2
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 10:57 AM
link   
Yet another way to cause some economic damage. Introduce dominant or destructive species to a country which can possibly effect crops/humans. Already the Asian Carp has caused a lot of stir with the local fisheries. I am not suggesting but wondering as per how many other critters were introduced on purpose/accident/unknowingly into a foreign land with negative side effects?

STINK_BUGS




edit on 2-7-2012 by hp1229 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 11:13 AM
link   
How many cockroaches have hitchiked in suitcases to/from hotels?

Stinkbugs are small and quiet and usually dont fart.

How many rats climbed into ships at ports?

People are so lazy that zebra mussels attach to their boats and they dont even check. Atleast insects arent from pure laziness..

How about africanized bees? Intentionally transported to south america for research. Queen excluders were removed from all hives by someone. This probably was malicious. Why would anyone transport freaking african killer bees?

Bugs of all kinds survived our mild winter. Its gonna be a crazy summer folks.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 11:26 AM
link   
reply to post by hp1229
 


I suppose animals have a right to be multicultural as well



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 12:09 PM
link   
reply to post by phroziac
 


True. There are several ways critters travel between continents. Its amazing to see the side effects that it might cause to other species and/or crops in a particular region.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 12:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by Hess88
reply to post by hp1229
 
I suppose animals have a right to be multicultural as well

Oh yes. I'm sure they're craving to migrate illegally across the pond to breed with new species



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 01:14 PM
link   
This is just wonderful...another Asian hitchhiker with no natural predators...this one damaging apples, peaches and grapes....and this one going after citrus:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Maybe the critter will stay out of Michigan: most of our apple crop in the north was destroyed by the early heat we had in March



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 01:46 PM
link   
reply to post by DontTreadOnMe
 

I wonder how many critters migrated prior to civilization to various continents. Only thing remains to be seen is the ability and adaptation by this particular one moving up towards canada and the east. I have a small patch of garden in the backyard and last year the egg plants were invaded by the japanese beetles. Why most of the foreign critters are destructive to the plants? Aern't there some that benefit the ecology?

I buy a bag of michigan apples every week for my kids. I just hope the industry in MI doesn't take a beating as already it has been struggling a lot since the 2008 crash and the real estate crash (though the big 3 I heard are hiring folks back).
edit on 2-7-2012 by hp1229 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 01:54 PM
link   
You forgot my favorite. Red Imported Fire Ant.

Stowed away aboard a ship that came into Mobile Bay in the 1930's, now it has dominion over most of the Southeast and is spreading northward. Extremely hard to keep under control, I have to battle fire ant hills every single weekend, and that is just to keep them controlled, there is no way to get rid of them. They can be deadly, and they often attack children, or the weak or infirmed. They kill housepets, they are just brutal. A single bite/sting leaves a blister and takes a few days to heal. The don't bite one at a time though, they swarm and they wait and then they all attack simultaneously after your feet and ankles are already covered.

An article with a pic.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 02:12 PM
link   
Fire ants are a plague here in SC where I live.

Add this to your list: Kudzu



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 02:14 PM
link   
Death to All Stink Bugs.

They're leaving this area after almost 2 years and finding other niches. No one seems to know why, but no one is complaining, either. What a nuisance!



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 02:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by eriktheawful
Fire ants are a plague here in SC where I live.

Add this to your list: Kudzu


The Kudzu is beautiful though, and it has many uses, and it was intentionally introduced to Georgia, they just didn't realize how aggressively it would take over. At least it doesn't bite or sting or cause rashes. I'm ok with Kudzu.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 02:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by HappyBunny
Death to All Stink Bugs.
They're leaving this area after almost 2 years and finding other niches. No one seems to know why, but no one is complaining, either. What a nuisance!



The brown marmorated stink bug was accidentally introduced into the United States from China or Japan. It is believed to have "hitched a ride" as a stowaway in packing crates. The first documented specimen was collected in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in September 1998.[3][10] Several Muhlenberg College students were reported to have seen these bugs as early as August of that same year.[6][11]

Other reports have the brown marmorated stink bug recovered as early as 2000 in New Jersey from a black light trap run by the Rutgers Cooperative Extension (RCE) Vegetable Integrated Pest Management program in Milford, New Jersey. [12] In 2002, it was again collected in New Jersey from black light traps located in Phillipsburg and Little York and was found on plant material in Stewartsville. It was quickly documented and established in many counties in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Connecticut and New York on the eastern coast of the United States. By 2009, this agricultural pest had reached Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Ohio, and Oregon.[13] In 2010 this pest was found in additional states including Indiana,[14] Michigan,[15] Minnesota,[16] and other states.[17] As of November, 2011 it has spread to 34 U.S. states.[4]


This is not the first time but so many other nuisances were introduced by the research organizations 'accidentally'. Ofcourse 'accountability' is out the window as its a research and educational facility.

Stink_Bugs



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 02:27 PM
link   
reply to post by hp1229
 


The Hawaii ecosystem has been devastated by the introduction of invasive species. Some intentional, some accidental. Rats made their way to the islands on ships, and began to destroy the area. So they came up with the bright idea of intentionally introducing the Mongoose to help control the rats. The problem here? Mongoose are active during the day, rats at night. They never saw each other. But the mongoose came to love the native birds, and contributed to the extinction of several species, as both they and the rat enjoy bird eggs.

Another example is the pig. The pig was introduced, and rapidly went feral. Now they grow huge, and tear up massive swaths of forest looking for food. Many attempts have been made to get them under control, none successful.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 02:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Zaphod58
 
Such has been the case in Okinawa as well from what I have seen in a documentary with respect to 'habu' and the mongoose. The mongoose was brought to the island to control the habu and other venemous snakes in control.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 03:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by getreadyalready

Originally posted by eriktheawful
Fire ants are a plague here in SC where I live.

Add this to your list: Kudzu


The Kudzu is beautiful though, and it has many uses, and it was intentionally introduced to Georgia, they just didn't realize how aggressively it would take over. At least it doesn't bite or sting or cause rashes. I'm ok with Kudzu.


I'll agree that it can look pretty in the summer when it mummifies every tree, telephone pole and even some houses.

But during the winter? Looks like a bunch of dead vines covering everything.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 03:41 PM
link   
Here I am lovin this altitude.We do have our bugs but not like the eastern south.

edit on 2-7-2012 by cavtrooper7 because: wrong south



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 03:47 PM
link   
reply to post by hp1229
 


You should see the campaign they have in place to keep the green tree snake out of the islands. It has completely depopulated the birds on Guam, and they're terrified that it will reach Hawaii. Any plane coming from that region is rigorously inspected, down to even having the UDA "Beagle Brigade" sniff around. If there is even a HINT of a snake seen, they lay out traps and bait in a huge area around where the sighting was.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 04:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
This is just wonderful...another Asian hitchhiker with no natural predators...this one damaging apples, peaches and grapes....and this one going after citrus:
www.abovetopsecret.com...


Well, to be fair, those apples, peaches and grapes are all also foreign.

The peach is actually from China, too. Grapes and apples originate in parts of Asia as well.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 04:40 PM
link   

Originally posted by getreadyalready

Originally posted by eriktheawful
Fire ants are a plague here in SC where I live.

Add this to your list: Kudzu


The Kudzu is beautiful though, and it has many uses, and it was intentionally introduced to Georgia, they just didn't realize how aggressively it would take over. At least it doesn't bite or sting or cause rashes. I'm ok with Kudzu.


Kudzu is actually a great feed crop for animals, and is very good for people, too.


Originally posted by getreadyalready
You forgot my favorite. Red Imported Fire Ant.

Stowed away aboard a ship that came into Mobile Bay in the 1930's, now it has dominion over most of the Southeast and is spreading northward.


If only there was some sort of federal regulatory agency in place to monitor that sort of thing...
edit on 2-7-2012 by stanguilles7 because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-7-2012 by stanguilles7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 04:42 PM
link   
reply to post by HappyBunny
 


Just curious...how were the mosquitoes during the stinkbug plague?

$$$



new topics

top topics



 
2
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join