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Sunken welsh kingdom's

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posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by XeroOne
 


The Royals go to Anglesy as part of their education, William did, his father before him. I presume to be taught magik. Prince Charles had his " Investiture of the Prince of Wales at Caernarfon in 1969 " A very peculiar ceremony which can be seen on youtube

There are also folk tales that the Welsh were the first to "discover" America in 1170


Madoc or Madog ab Owain Gwynedd was, according to folklore, a Welsh prince who sailed to America in 1170, over three hundred years before Christopher Columbus's voyage in 1492. According to the story, he was a son of Owain Gwynedd who took to the sea to flee internecine violence at home. The legend evidently evolved out of a medieval tradition about a Welsh hero's sea voyage, only allusions to which survive.

en.wikipedia.org...

It would not even surprise me if Atlantis is Ireland or sunken just off the coast, I think the Atlantans became the Celts/Picts and particulary the Welsh of Anglesy




posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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Originally posted by trustnothing
reply to post by XeroOne
 


The Royals go to Anglesy as part of their education, William did, his father before him. I presume to be taught magik. Prince Charles had his " Investiture of the Prince of Wales at Caernarfon in 1969 " A very peculiar ceremony which can be seen on youtube

Interesting... I didn't know that.


It would not even surprise me if Atlantis is Ireland or sunken just off the coast, I think the Atlantans became the Celts/Picts and particulary the Welsh of Anglesy

Sounds like you've heard about the Egyptian-style relics and symbolism turning up in Ireland? Now that is an enigma.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by XeroOne
 


Yes indeed, there are also stories that Jesus visited Ireland sometime after being initiated into the mysteries in Egypt, he is also believed to have visited Tibetan monks during his travels. I think he may have been a very powerfull magician.

There is a poem by an Oregon poet I like:

The talking oak
To the ancients spoke.
But any tree
Will talk to me.
What truths I know
I garnered so.
But those who want to talk and tell,
And those who would not listeners be,
Will never hear a syllable
From out the lips of any tree.
- Mary Carolyn Davies, Be different to trees

I am sure the first half of that was attributed to anonymous, ending at will talk to me. The Celts were very into talking to trees, the Picts stones etc too. Its the same belief we see with Shamans, I watched a doc recently, they asked the Shaman how they knew which plants to eat, he said, "cos they tell us" The documentary breaches T&Cs I think

I would love to be able to speak welsh particulary ancient welsh as it predates english and its mother languages by sooo long, I bet there are some interesting texts stored away in the British museum, however much of it is probably word of mouth hence why the future monarch has to go live there for a year.

This is kinda where my interest in "conspiracy" began, with Welsh/ Atlantis/ Magik etc Its amazing how similar cultures around the world are, particularly pagan/shaman ones. Great thread
edit on 2-7-2012 by trustnothing because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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You get my vote for something there.

This not just about rising sea levels but coastal erosion as well. Close to home, many villages have been lost in the Humber from the middle Ages. Ravenser odd is worth a read as this was lost virtually overnight in a storm and is completely underwater.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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Ravenser Odd was lost in the 1300 - comparably new in comparison to your dates.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 04:38 PM
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The Scilly Isles are sinking, as well as the sea level rising, so it's not outside the realm of possibility:


There are also ancient walls, the sort that would have been used to divide fields, which can be seen at low tides just off some of the islands that make up the Scilly Isles. There are even references to areas that no longer exist, but are definitely from the isles in the Cornish language.

It's not just the rising sea levels that have caused this though. The entirety of the south of England is slowly sinking, and the difference this would make could easily be seen in the time span that Scilly displays.

It's also worth noting that when the tide becomes low enough, it's possible to walk between some of the islands on causeways, and that numerous legends of a sunken land between Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly can be found in the Arthurian legends, and in Breton, Cornish and Celtic folklore.

It's unlikely that the rate of sinking will increase, but if it does, these islands could quickly find themselves underwater. Some people even hypothesise that this transition could take place as quickly as overnight, though these are definitely in the minority.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com...


Source
edit on 2-7-2012 by aorAki because: sauce



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 05:05 PM
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This link gives some very interesting information on Anglesey and the Holy Isle as well as what little is know about the druids who lived there until the Romans came.

www.philipcoppens.com...


Legends state that Bardsey Island, also known as Ynys Enlli, is identified as the last resting place of Merlin the Magician, the archetypal druid. The legends state that he slept in a magical glass castle, surrounded by the Thirteen Treasures of Britain, and constantly attended to by nine bardic companions.
Ynys Enlli is usually interpreted as "Isle of the Currents" or "Tide-Race Island", in reference to the treacherous waters of Bardsey Sound that can make for a perilous and sometimes impossible crossing. It may, however, also be a corrupted form of Ynys Fenlli, "Benlli's Island", a reference to the giant Benlli Gawr, who was an Irish warlord that conquered the Kingdom of Powys.


This shows some of the artifacts which were recovered from the dried lake Llyn Cerrig Bach which is now an RAF runway
www.museumwales.ac.uk...



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 


interesting but this suposidly took place around the 6th century
bookmarked that page gonna have a good read off that.

and yes Slaine The horned god (awsome graphic novel) got it on hardback since my early teens
and yes its where i got my username
i belive he's based on the irish Cuchulain,
got the book with the map out now and Tír na nÓg is not on it? lol.

and yea i guess it must be costal errosion





edit on 2/7/12 by slaine1978 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by XeroOne
 


no they mention it's inbetween anglesey
and north wales.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 05:50 PM
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Originally posted by XeroOne

Originally posted by trustnothing
reply to post by XeroOne
 



Sounds like you've heard about the Egyptian-style relics and symbolism turning up in Ireland? Now that is an enigma.


never heard of that one will have to look into it



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by templar knight
 


interesting,
the uk is full of
interesting history. shame the costal errosion
is still ongoing but thats earth for you



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:06 PM
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I F&S'd the OP....really interesting subject and seems to have developed into a really interesting thread.
I would like to point out before I reply to some specific posts on this page, that I am from Anglesey and totally bi-lingual. Just thought I should mention both as both location and language have been brought up.

I am not terribly well read on welsh history, much to my shame, but I have a few tidbits which might help.

First..Welsh was the original language of GB before the Irish and 'english' arrived. Glasgow for example was originally known as Glasgoed. There are many historical references where Welsh was spoken even in what is nowknown as London. Even in Boudica's time Welsh was the spoken language. There has been a recent BBC2 series about the history of Britain starting right at the beginning where Welsh was the native tongue and the Welsh were the original habitants.

As to the sinking of many coastal villages, in this case off Anglesey. The last Prince (legitimate!) of Wales...Llewelyn had his home in Aber...between Llandudno (Great Orm) and Penmaenmawr. He was very much in love with some princess or another who lived over on Anglesey near to where the OP is about. At low tide the Menai Strait would drain so much he could ride across on his horse.

When
I was in my early teens, over 30 years ago, my aunt and uncle had a university graduate staying with them as she was completing her Doctorate on the geography/geology of Anglesey. I was fascinated with her work and started my life long love of Geography. Anyway she told me that part of her study was a continuation of records that were being made about Anglesey was sinking approximately 1cm every 10 years.

Anyhow...thats my rather irrelevant contribution to this thread

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:09 PM
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Originally posted by slaine1978
reply to post by XeroOne
 


no they mention it's inbetween anglesey
and north wales.


Suppose it's possible to deduce that by looking at the geology of Wales. The western coast is basically very solid rock that erodes much slower. The south coast around the Penarth area is a very different story, having a high amount of sandstone and limestone, and two very small islands are visible from around there.


There are many historical references where Welsh was spoken even in what is nowknown as London. Even in Boudica's time Welsh was the spoken language. There has been a recent BBC2 series about the history of Britain starting right at the beginning where Welsh was the native tongue and the Welsh were the original habitants.

There are also a few sporadic Viking references around Wales as well, including street names.
edit on 2-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by trustnothing
 


interesting never heard that bardsey island is
suposed to be the resting place of merlin,
i know how important anglesey was to the
druids, and bardsey island is only just down the coast.

maybe bardsey island is also the isle of avalon?

and thx for the link mate




edit on 2/7/12 by slaine1978 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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Originally posted by XeroOne

Originally posted by trustnothing
reply to post by XeroOne
 


The Royals go to Anglesy as part of their education, William did, his father before him. I presume to be taught magik. Prince Charles had his " Investiture of the Prince of Wales at Caernarfon in 1969 " A very peculiar ceremony which can be seen on youtube





I would be very interested to know what makes you say that the royals go to Anglesey as part of their education. As far as I am aware Prince Charles attended a 6 week intensive course at Harlech Uni to learn Welsh. As for William...he is continuing his 'education' as RAF 'copter pilot at RAF Valley.

As to Charles' investiture being peculiar...do you mean because he took his oath as Prince of Wales in Welsh...is that what made it 'peculiar' for you? I am no ardent royalist, but I am curious as to why you have drawn the conclusions you have in your post


Rainbows
Jane
edit on 2-7-2012 by angelchemuel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by angelchemuel
 


hope it don't sink
cymru am byth.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:27 PM
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reply to post by XeroOne
 


the viking names came later around the
10 century or so lol

my hometown swansea is suposed to be based on
the viking language however it has its welsh name too abertawe



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by XeroOne

Originally posted by slaine1978
reply to post by XeroOne
 


no they mention it's inbetween anglesey
and north wales.


Suppose it's possible to deduce that by looking at the geology of Wales. The western coast is basically very solid rock that erodes much slower. The south coast around the Penarth area is a very different story, having a high amount of sandstone and limestone, and two very small islands are visible from around there.


There are many historical references where Welsh was spoken even in what is nowknown as London. Even in Boudica's time Welsh was the spoken language. There has been a recent BBC2 series about the history of Britain starting right at the beginning where Welsh was the native tongue and the Welsh were the original habitants.

There are also a few sporadic Viking references around Wales as well, including street names.[editby]edit on 2-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)


Anglesey was known as OnglesEye by the Vikings. Where I come from in the far NE of Anglesey there is plenty of historical stuff with the invasion by the Vikings.

Anglesey was the last stronghold of the Welsh druids against the Romans. Some did escape to Ireland. There is a story that Merlin's couldron full of gold was buried just outside the town where I was born and that his staff is somewhere in the middle of Anglesey. There are even tales that Merlin (Merddyn/Emrys) hailed from Anglesey where he grew up learning his druidry.

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by slaine1978
 


Lol!...nah...more likely to break away, collapsing the bridges and float further out into the Irish Sea!...there is a fault line straight down the Straits all the way up the coast past Blackpool.

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:40 PM
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I wonder if there is truth to the Welsh version of the Arthur legends. Wouldn't Angelsey be the perfect candidate for the island of Avalon? It seems more central than Bardsey.
edit on 2-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



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