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Lakes... 650ft Beneath the Waves!

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posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by gemineye
 


Thats the first thing that crossed my mind.




posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 02:39 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Good find.

I've heard of this before well something similar.
There are pockets of fresh water when underground fishers open up.
Since the water is so pure of dissolved solids it doesn't mix with the sea water.
I had no idea the same thing occurs with super concentrated salt water.
It makes sense though.

Oh and something interesting about the fresh water pockets.
You mentioned the submarine bounced off the barrier.
When submarines hit the fresh water barrier they actually sink and crash into the ocean floor if the pocket is big enough that is.

Thanks for this thread it was an interesting read.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 03:08 AM
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That is amazing! I have to look into this. I feel like there are lots of things we haven't seen or even imagined yet!



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 03:48 AM
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Originally posted by isthisreallife
reply to post by Atombombchicken
 


Well if you look in the last picture, there's a diver swimming in the water so it must not be impenetrable. Probably much tougher, for lack of a better word, than regular salt water.

Also, the article mentions a specific type of bacteria that live in the "lakes" so I would assume something else could possibly be down there. Although it would probably be limited to only microbial lifeforms.


You're not seeing it right, the diver is swimming above the lake, not in it, floating on water, in water.

Notice how he's not underneath it. I know it's a hard concept.... It's like that old Pimp My Ride meme, Yo Dog, I put a lake inside your lake, so you can float, while you float.

Only here it's not comedy, it's literal...
edit on 2-7-2012 by Laokin because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 04:32 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Would not want to be that diver if suddenly there was a leak in the helmet. Ultra-concentrated sea-brine is not something you want in your face. But very interesting OP



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:02 AM
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very cool pictures, never seen that aspect of the unsea world before. When I see things like this it really makes me wish I would have chosen a more interesting carrier path. Damn my mundane job. :p



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 06:48 AM
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that's amazing, I never knew that something like that this could exist. Thank you for sharing with us



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 07:22 AM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

It's neat, but as any diver can tell you its not an uncommon occurrence. Its a type of water stratification, called a Halocline. Haloclines and even more common Thermoclines are not unusual in diving here in Florida, especially in fresh water with a brackish or sea water intrusion layer. I can tell you places where you can go here in FL, and see these “underwater” lakes (stratification layers), if you have a basic open-water certification. For example Hudson Grotto has permanent thermoclines, and sometimes has salt water intrusion into its lowest levels.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 07:26 AM
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Imagine all the scenarios on different planets and moons. Yeap...we sure are alone...



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 07:33 AM
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Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
Great way to hide a sub for stealth
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Subs have been using stratification thermoclines to hide from sonar for decades. Again there is nothing new about this:


5. How a bathythermograph can be used to make sonar ineffective
When we use a bathythermograph, we actually look for a thermo cline. A thermo cline is a layer of water where the temperature gradient is greater than that of the warmer layer above and the colder layer below. When the temperature gradient is greater, a sound wave rapidly bending towards the sea bottom. The sound wave goes to the sea bottom and “stay there”. The sound wave is useless.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 07:38 AM
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"There is water beneath the ocean." - Talking Heads. That is a good song.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by isthisreallife
 


The water is probably denser or more floatable because of the hypersalinity.
Like in the dead sea.

More than likely the neutral buoyancy of the submersible is keeping it from going down further. The submersible would need more weight to get past the hypersalinity of that water.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:08 AM
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Originally posted by Laokin

Originally posted by isthisreallife
reply to post by Atombombchicken
 


You're not seeing it right, the diver is swimming above the lake, not in it, floating on water, in water.

Notice how he's not underneath it. I know it's a hard concept....
edit on 2-7-2012 by Laokin because: (no reason given)




skip to 2:30. It might not be the same dive (though it sure looks like it) but they did go in and under. I think the picture is showing a diver partly submerged.. em.. in the lake.




edit on 2/7/12 by D.Wolf because: img included



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:10 AM
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This is an excerpt from the BBC TV show "The Blue Planet" with David Attenborough. Funnily enough, that exact clip was on last week's show (episode 2.)

There were many interesting natural phenomenon shown in that show, and some truly bizarre creatures too. The deep ocean is only 1% explored, apparently we know more about the moon than we know about the deep ocean.

It was a good series (it's a repeat) well worth acquiring if you found the opening post interesting.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:15 AM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Here are some Haloclines in a cave dive.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:32 AM
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Thank you for sharing this. It is amazing how nature works! There is still so much that remains unexplored under the sea...so much more to find. We look up and see millions of stars and wonder about 'life' beyond earth, while there is still so much about different 'life forms' on earth itself, that remains masked from us. Ignorance is no bliss! Thanks for illuminating us with this post.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:35 AM
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What I want to know is that the article claimed that this area was underwater for sometime after the dinosaurs yet I want to know where the trees came from?

edit on 2-7-2012 by Shadow Herder because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Spectacular how God creations is so beautiful.

To bad they tried to explain how it was formed as though they knew or that some one was there to see the formation.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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I think i am more fascinated in what trees are doing 650 feet under the ocean, ofcourse they'd be petrified by now. Proof of the Great Flood buahahahaha.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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no real danger to submersible what you are thinki8ng of is when a sub hits a pocket of fresh water since its buoncy set for salt water if it hits a very large patch of fresh water it sinks because the lack of salt in the water. the reason the sub could not go into the lake because they were set for ocean salinity so they where in effect too light to break into salt water pool.






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