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How well do you know 'shooting stars'?

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posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:02 PM
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We all love 'shooting stars', but how much do you really know about them?

To find out, try this short quiz on the subject.

I'd say that one of the answers they say is correct, is actually arguably wrong, or at least a little misleading, hence why I only got 9 out of 10 questions right (Grrrr!)

I won't say which just yet (no - it's not the first question!), but the first poster to spot it gets a star


So how many did you get right?




posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by FireballStorm
 

Same happened to me.
It was the crater question, which I still think the Barringer crater is the most famous.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:12 PM
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You Scored 100%
You answered 10 out of 10 questions correct!
If you scored a perfect 10, you're a meteor shower master. If you got 8 or better, you're a rising shooting star. If you scored 7 or less, try again — we know you can do better!

I couldn't spot the question you referred to.

Though whenever i find one, i sure won't do with it what i answered



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:21 PM
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reply to post by FireballStorm
 


I got 9/10 as well. The one I missed was the one about the Geminid shower and the Perseid shower...shouldn't that be a subjective answer?



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:37 PM
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I love them all. Ever since i was young.

I still do watch them from time to time.

especial the new series.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:46 PM
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I missed 2.


I missed the persadies and haley comet ones.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 11:57 PM
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I got question 8 wrong - the Geminid/ Perseid one. I think I agree with the previous poster who said it's subjective.

edit on 30/6/12 by Insomniac because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:04 AM
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I missed question 2: Why are they called "shooting stars".



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by charlyv
 


That wasn't the question that stumped me. It's actually a trick question - a 'meteor' technically is light caused by the meteoroid as it passes through our atmosphere.

I have to say, when I look at the way the correct answer was worded, I think it could have been worded better.


Originally posted by Romekje
Though whenever i find one, i sure won't do with it what i answered


Sorry, I couldn't understand what you were trying to convey here Romekje, but well done for getting 10/10



Originally posted by edaced4
I got 9/10 as well. The one I missed was the one about the Geminid shower and the Perseid shower...shouldn't that be a subjective answer?


Well done


I can easily see how people would see it as subjective. For most people a good display aka 'consistency' can be determined by many factors, like the weather, and the timing of the shower, which might suit one location but not another.

Once again, it could perhaps have been worded better, but I think that by "best" they mean the most consistent in terms of rates, which is obviously averaged out over many reports, and many years. In that respect I think the Geminids is the correct answer.

The Perseids would actually rank 3rd after the Quadrantids in terms of consistency of high ZHR from year to year. I've personally observed some very nice displays from both Perseids and Geminids, but the weather in early January usually plays havoc with meteor observing, so I've never really got a good look at the Quadrantids.

reply to post by kdog1982
 


That's still not bad going to be fair



Originally posted by Saint Exupery
I missed question 2: Why are they called "shooting stars".


I had to think about that one for a while. Again, I think the wording leaves a lot to be desired. Still nice going considering this


Seeing as no one has spotted the question that got me, I'll hold off posting which one it was for a little longer.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 08:30 PM
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7/10

2nd line


jra

posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 11:08 PM
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10/10 for me, but for the last one I just made a guess and picked the one that sounded like the best answer.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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Well done shadowland8 - 7/10 still isn't bad


Congratulations on your 10/10 jra


Good too see ATS members getting good scores.


As no one guessed which was the question that stumped me, here it is - "How fast do meteors fly when they light up the night sky?"

The correct answer according to them was "About 30,000 miles per hour." I picked "Faster than a speeding bullet.", which is true, albeit a lot faster than a bullet.

It's generally accepted that an ordinary meteoroid in a solar orbit is going anywhere from about 10-73 km/s when it enters our atmosphere.

"30,000 miles per hour." translates to about 84 miles/s or 132 km/s, which is approaching double the fastest speed that a meteoroid is going.

I'd argue that "30,000 miles per hour." is misleading/wrong for that reason. 20, 000 mph or even 10, 000 would have been a more honest estimate.

Well, that's my excuse anyway. Perhaps it's only a minor niggle, especially seeing as most of you who replied got it right, but I find it a little disconcerting that space.com, who in my experience are usually pretty good at "dotting the "i's, and crossing the "t's"", seem to have been a bit lax on this one.

So if there's a moral/message of this thread, I think it's "be weary of what you read, and don't take everything that's said as 100% accurate".

Thanks to all who replied


jra

posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 07:28 PM
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Originally posted by FireballStorm
"30,000 miles per hour." translates to about 84 miles/s or 132 km/s, which is approaching double the fastest speed that a meteoroid is going.


I think your math is wrong, or my Google math is wrong.

For 30,000mph I get 8.3 miles/sec or 13.4km/s



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by jra
 


Thanks jra. I worked it out again, and you're right.

I'm not sure how I managed to get it wrong, as I checked my calculation three times, but then maths never was my strong point!

I feel a bit silly now.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 07:05 PM
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9/10

That darn Geminid and the Perseid shower question got me.......


Nice little test though.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Not a bad score eriktheawful


That Geminid question seems to be catching out quite a few ATSers.

I guess people are less familiar with the Geminids?

If that's the case, I'd highly recommend observing them to anyone who hasn't.

Two or three years back I counted well over 500 in a single night from a rural observing site. This year should be another good one with the moon out of the way. The predicted peak time (23h30m UT December 13) is more suited to the UK/Europe/Africa, but for people in the US/Canada It'll still be worth looking, especially if the peak is a bit later than expected.

In the mean time, bring on the Perseids, only 5 weeks away now, and incidentally is better timed for the US/Canada this year, although in practice it probably won't make too much difference where you are in the Northern hemisphere.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 08:15 PM
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What causes meteor showers?

Aliens, they don't like us and it shows.


Every sci-fi fan wants to pick this one. They bait you, I tell you!

7/10

I had a meteor burn up in the air near me about a month and a half ago, on the south side of the bridge I walk across to get home. Probably not 100 feet from me the fire ball flared out and disappeared. Very cool.

edit on 4-7-2012 by SibylofErythrae because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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Not too shabby SibylofErythrae



Originally posted by SibylofErythrae
I had a meteor burn up in the air near me about a month and a half ago, on the south side of the bridge I walk across to get home. Probably not 100 feet from me the fire ball flared out and disappeared. Very cool.


Meteors can be quite deceiving. They can seem much closer than they actually are, which is at least in part due to their brightness, which we/our brains misinterpret as a distance cue. In other words it's an illusion. Have a look at this thread here for a more in-depth explanation and sources.

I've experienced the same illusion myself when observing meteors, and I agree it's spectacular



posted on Jul, 5 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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Oh no, it wasn't an illusion. It was about 100 feet to the south of me when it burned up totally. No more an illusion than seeing a bird at the same distance, streaking down. But thank you for the link on atmospheric illusions, I'm sure it is going to be an interesting read.

I like to find a reason to go watch the showers, and have seen many meteroites. Particularly over the last couple of years. Which is pretty impressive because I live in a VERY bright city. But because of that, there are fewer stars in the background to wash out the view of the meteorites you do see.

Up closer to the arctic circle the sky is just awash in stars, and it gives a totally different experience watching for them.

This is a dark perserve. Fabulous idea. Little bit cold for the winter shower. I haven't decided I'm THAT interested yet.
www.cypresshills.com...
edit on 5-7-2012 by SibylofErythrae because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2012 @ 01:10 PM
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9 out of 10 rising shooting star
I LOVE STARZ




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