Canary Islands,Yellow Alert( El Hierro Volcano)

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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 12:59 PM
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Calm down.

El Hiro is not the Mega-Tsunami island.


La Palma is the island that is a mega tsunami 'threat' and it is not close enough to El Hiro to be affected directly or indirectly. Ontop of which it would take a drastic eruption to move La Palma.
edit on 29-6-2012 by Foxe because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 01:08 PM
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For once I'm actually glad to be in Texas. Still, if there is enough dust kicked up by the explosion, perhaps it would knock down the heat a little. Its so hot, eggs are being laid already hard boiled. I'm going to keep an eye on this. Thanks for posting, OP!



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 01:55 PM
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Originally posted by EvanB
The main threat in my view is the potential for explosiveness if the sea water that surrounds the volcano makes it to the magma chamber... The temp differential of the water meeting the magma would blow the whole island apart... The resulting tsunami would be devastating...

That right there is the potential. That the water reservoir and magma chambers deep within the island may meet. And if that resulting explosive event and accompanying earthquake results in a land slide, then watch out eastern seaboard.

Landslide induced tsunamis are far worse than any other wave type event. Instead of under the surface shock waves that travel at the speed of sound say caused by earthquakes, they roll at enormous height having deep energy transfer to wave height as they approach shore.

Here is a little taste of that:


I was wondering if you know what the magnitude of the quakes in your chart are?



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by Foxe
 

Thank you for that. Disregard my last transmission.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by Mister1k
 


S&F well done



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by ANNED
 


East Coast US has lots of reactors, looks at these maps for more info.

www.survivalistboards.com...


www.nukepills.com...



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by Foxe
Calm down.

El Hiro is not the Mega-Tsunami island.


La Palma is the island that is a mega tsunami 'threat' and it is not close enough to El Hiro to be affected directly or indirectly. Ontop of which it would take a drastic eruption to move La Palma.

Correct.

Also,


The volcanic island of La Palma in the Canaries is much more stable than is generally assumed, Dutch scientists working at the TU Delft have found. The southwestern flank of the island isn’t likely to fall into the sea (potentially causing a tsunami) for at least another 10,000 years, professor Jan Nieuwenhuis states in the September edition of the university’s science magazine Delft Integraal.

The TU Delft research findings should be a relief for people living at or near the Atlantic coasts of the US, Africa and Europe. Six years ago, geologists proposed that La Palma is so unstable that it might lose one of its flanks during a volcanic eruption in the near future. This would cause a ‘mega tsunami’ with massive waves up to hundreds of meters in height. Cities like New York, Boston, Lisbon and Casablanca would be all but wiped from the face of the planet, according to the more pessimistic estimates.

But according to the new TU Delft research, the Cumbre Vieja volcano on the island simply isn’t large enough to fall apart… yet. In a first of its kind study, the Dutch researchers modelled the inside of the flank and then simulated several volcanic eruptions and watery ‘steam explosions’. In every simulation, the volcanic flank stayed firmly in its place. ‘This is simply a very stable island’, says team leader professor Jan Nieuwenhuis in the September edition of the TU Delft science magazine Delft Integraal.

According to Nieuwenhuis’ calculations, it would take the strength of about 600 million modern fighter jet engines to pull the flank apart: at least 12,000 to 28,000 billion Newton. That is much more than can be expected from a volcanic outburst on La Palma, the team concludes. Only under very extreme conditions, the flank could become unstable, Nieuwenhuis has calculated. This would require unusually heavy rainfall during an exceptionally strong magmatic outburst, or some other highly unlikely combination of circumstances. ‘Based on what we know now, so many things must go wrong that a disaster seems very, very unlikely’, says Janneke van Berlo, who recently graduated in the group of prof. Nieuwenhuis.

The researchers calculate that the surest way to cause a landslide is to wait for at least another 10,000 years. The Cumbre Vieja volcano steadily grows and this causes the flanks of the volcano to become steeper and less stable. ‘A combination of substantial vertical growth and eruption forces will most probably act to trigger failure. To reach substantial growth, a time span in the order of 10,000 years will be required’, Van Berlo states.

At a glance, La Palma doesn’t look very solid even today. It has lost chunks of its flanks at least twice in prehistoric times already. And during the last eruption, in 1949, a two kilometer long rip appeared at the top of Cumbre Vieja’s southwestern flank. But the Delft researchers point out that the cut is nothing more than the result of an innocent, shallow phenomenon, for example local adaptive settlements of the volcano. What’s more, the ancient collapses are good evidence La Palma is stable now: the collapses only occurred when La Palma was much higher than today, at least 2,000 and 2,500-3,000 meter respectively.

Even if the volcanic flank did become critically unstable, it isn’t likely it will go with a splash. ‘Of course the flank won’t go in one piece, but break up first’, Nieuwenhuis said. ‘And it could very well slide down a little and then settle in a more stable configuration, just like our dykes in Holland often do when they go unstable.’ The plunge won’t be a fast and sudden event, Nieuwenhuis stresses. ‘It will more be like a steam locomotive powering up. The first meter of movement should take several days.’

Source: Delft University of Technology



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 06:58 PM
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I live in Florida. This would wash across the entire state according to some estimates. My elevation is 50 feet and I am about 40 miles inland. I don't think it will hit me as a wave, but I expect it to swell inland quickly raising water level up to 50 feet deep.

If I have the time to head toward the gulf I can get ahead of it. If I don't have time I have my sailboat pre-rigged in my yard for sailing. No food onboard, but at least I could try and stay dry. The debris field would likely be nasty and plenty of unpleasant things would be floating. This is not a scenario I want to see played out, but I have prepared the best I can just in case.

That is all you can do for any situation.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 08:08 PM
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Interesting discussions.

However in my quest for the truth of the matter, at least in relation to possible seismic or volcanic events that might happen, I will have to resign myself to wait and see what happens, if anything.

Until then, "keep your fingers crossed".
(Yet another mythological reference in our language, also I read that it originally took two people with each of their index fingers to cross for a wish, but over time it more recently developed into a solo ordeal. Just a little factoid there.)
edit on 29-6-2012 by muzzleflash because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 08:30 PM
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It seems they're all acting up:




TextJune 29, 2012 – ANTARCTICA – Mt Siple volcano in Antarctica might have become active and produced a steam plume recently detected on satellite imagery. The latest Smithsonian activity report mentions: “Infrared imagery from the Metop satellite showed


theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com...

I wonder if the strange sound heard around the world is a precursor to global volcanic upheaval?

Mystery sound felt or heard in all corners of San Diego County leaves experts puzzled
Posted on June 30, 2012



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 08:53 PM
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yep blah blah,

Though shouldn't say that,

Last five years shes blowing,

Not even an spurt yet.

Think personally when she goes (next large canaries eruption) as type and location pretty rapid,

Hard to predict and voluminous,

Have an cup of tea.

Elf



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 08:54 PM
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reply to post by murkraz
 


seconds to that, if I had an point for every time ive backtracked that...

Love elf



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by gemineye
I don't even pretend to know what would happen if that big chunk of land falls into the ocean, but I found some info from more recent computer simulations and it sounds as if they're saying the megatsunami we've all come to fear is a worst case scenario and is unlikely to happen. Here's a link:


To take a fresh look at the impact of these smaller events — and give old results a reality check — a different research group created and ran the most detailed computer simulations to date for the volcano.

“This has remained unexplored territory,” said Stéphan Grilli , a University of Rhode Island ocean engineer and co-author of the new tsunami study, published March 30 in Journal of Geophysical Research . “Our hunch now is that the East Coast would see no more than a hurricane storm surge of 10 to 15 feet.”


Source

This seems to suggest that at least the east coast of the US wont be obliterated. Would be nice to see predictions for other countries as well. I'm in the US and even I think there's too much focus on the US alone! There are plenty other people out there on other continents as well!


While they might not understand mega-tsunami are a fact and if you watched some of the documentaries on them you might understand that they are not like a normal tsunami.



transcript of movieTranscript of megatsunamis by BBC



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 09:31 PM
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Originally posted by onecraftydude
I live in Florida. This would wash across the entire state according to some estimates. My elevation is 50 feet and I am about 40 miles inland. I don't think it will hit me as a wave, but I expect it to swell inland quickly raising water level up to 50 feet deep.

If I have the time to head toward the gulf I can get ahead of it. If I don't have time I have my sailboat pre-rigged in my yard for sailing. No food onboard, but at least I could try and stay dry. The debris field would likely be nasty and plenty of unpleasant things would be floating. This is not a scenario I want to see played out, but I have prepared the best I can just in case.

That is all you can do for any situation.


I imagine that when the wave would hit it would push debris with it inland making a wall of debris crushing everything in its path ... not just water!



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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Originally posted by Foxe
Calm down.

El Hiro is not the Mega-Tsunami island.


La Palma is the island that is a mega tsunami 'threat' and it is not close enough to El Hiro to be affected directly or indirectly. Ontop of which it would take a drastic eruption to move La Palma.
edit on 29-6-2012 by Foxe because: (no reason given)


If you watched any of the documentaries on mega-tsunamis you would realize it is not it does not take a massive eruption which causes these landslides. They have found that the rock layers produced by during eruptions are layered. then as water naturally filters through the path of least resistance of the rock layers. It is theorized that the water is heated and steam explosions are what dislodges the landslide which causes a mega-tsunami.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 09:47 PM
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I still think this may apply, if anyone recognizes it (From ATS/and elsewhere):

"...Yes, there are unusual events in 2012 but they do not cause the world to end. Unfortunately, I have decided not to discuss events that you or I can do anything about. It is important that they be a surprise. Perhaps you are familiar with the story of the Red Sea and the Egyptians?"

Obviously one can always predict there WILL be a natural disaster, in general terms.

We haven't had a tsunami over 60 ft in the last 30 years.
The '64 AK quake was the last really bad one.
Last thing Atlantic nations need is a big wave train - it will literally sink what's left of the world
economy, with a lot of casualties and chaos.

El Hierro is worth monitoring. Wish they didn't deactivate the webcams...
edit on 6/29/2012 by drphilxr because: more



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 11:59 PM
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I bloody well wish something or nother would happen already so we could get it on already. Nature, illuminati, god, whoever dang it either crap or get off the pot already. I can feel something in my bones 'coming' but I don't know what, but whatever it is, I am not scared. I just want to see it so I can say COOL and okay, that's it. Alright then.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 02:16 AM
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Keep in mind the condition created by a pole shift. The earthquake would cause land sinking that would sink part of Cal if not a lot more of the USA west coast. On the east coast there would be dust blows. Winds, static charges and darkness do to the dust as also all the Volcanos go off including Yellowstone. This event (you bet) would be enough to dump La Palma onto aggravated seas that some say could have waves of 200 to 300 feet high before it happened. The east coast would also have water coming in from the lakes and the Gulf. Just how much the winds would have on the size of the waves is not known. .



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by HoppedUp
 


I do agree with you but we still got to live and fight the good fight.....not just sit here waiting

One day IT will happen and when that day comes get a glass of your favourite booze, find a good view and light up,



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 04:15 AM
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Originally posted by onecraftydude
I live in Florida. This would wash across the entire state according to some estimates. My elevation is 50 feet and I am about 40 miles inland. I don't think it will hit me as a wave, but I expect it to swell inland quickly raising water level up to 50 feet deep.

If I have the time to head toward the gulf I can get ahead of it. If I don't have time I have my sailboat pre-rigged in my yard for sailing. No food onboard, but at least I could try and stay dry. The debris field would likely be nasty and plenty of unpleasant things would be floating. This is not a scenario I want to see played out, but I have prepared the best I can just in case.

That is all you can do for any situation.


Well you could do a little bit more and store some water and cans in your boat. At least it would not hurt.
I wish you the best of luck if you do need to set sail!

Edit.
Do not forget a couple of Cuban Cigars and a bottle of Rum
edit on 30-6-2012 by LiberalSceptic because: necessities





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