It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What does the Supreme Court's health-care ruling mean for me?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 07:32 PM
link   

The court's decision to uphold all but one component of the health-care law means new rules for insurers that have already taken effect will remain in place. Beginning in 2014, virtually all Americans will have to obtain health insurance or pay a penalty. There also will be new opportunities to get coverage, including state-based marketplaces known as exchanges* (through which individuals will be able to purchase private plans that meet strict benchmarks for quality) and federal subsidies to help low-income people buy plans on the exchanges. The law will also expand the eligibility rules for Medicaid, but the Court found that states can not be penalized if they decline to comply with the expansion, raising questions as to how effectively the federal government will be able to implement it.

Answer the questions below to see how your coverage might be affected.

Full article


Anyone who opposes the law should take 10 seconds and try this tool. Post the result. Let's see if your fears are founded or irrational.




posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 07:34 PM
link   
My results

Your coverage:

Right now:
Your insurer cannot set a lifetime limit on benefit payouts. Any annual limits will be phased out by 2014.

Your insurer cannot cancel your plan after you get sick based on a technicality, or discriminate against your children if they have a pre-existing condition.

You may also be entitled to coverage of preventive services without out-of-pocket charges.

If you are an adult under age 26, and one or both of your parents have a health plan, they may be able to put you on it. If you have adult children you can probably keep them on your plan until they are 26.

Starting in 2014:
Insurers can’t discriminate against you for having a pre-existing condition, and can only vary rates within a narrow range.

If the plan offered by your employer doesn’t meet the law’s standards of affordability or comprehensiveness, you can buy a different plan through your state’s exchange with federal assistance.

Based on your income, your annual premiums for that plan would be no more than $840 to $1,120. Your maximum out-of-pocket costs for deductibles and co-payments would be capped at 6 percent of the total cost.
edit on 6/28/12 by shaluach because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 12:22 AM
link   
Your coverage:

Right now:If you have been unable to obtain health insurance as a result of a pre-existing medical condition, you may be able to buy it through one of the “high risk pools” the law has set up in each state through the end of 2013. But the premiums in the pools vary and can be high.

Starting in 2014:Based on your income, it appears you would be eligible for Medicaid beginning no later than 2014. The law expands Medicaid to all individuals and families with incomes at or below 133 percent of the federal poverty level. But the court found that states cannot be penalized if they decline to comply with the expansion, raising questions as to how effectively the federal government will be able to implement it.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 01:28 AM
link   
I am already fortunate enough to have above average health care options. Despite that, I am happy for a new direction for our health care laws. I don't mind paying extra taxes to help others have better health options. And that statement is coming from someone who generally won't lift a finger to help anyone who is not making enough effort to help themselves. Citizens need their health in order to contribute to society.



Right now:Your insurer cannot set a lifetime limit on benefit payouts. Any annual limits will be phased out by 2014.

Your insurer cannot cancel your plan after you get sick based on a technicality, or discriminate against your children if they have a pre-existing condition.

You may also be entitled to coverage of preventive services without out-of-pocket charges.

If you are an adult under age 26, and one or both of your parents have a health plan, they may be able to put you on it. If you have adult children you can probably keep them on your plan until they are 26.

Starting in 2014:You will have the option of buying a health plan through your state’s exchange. Based on your income, you probably would not qualify for federal assistance to offset the cost of that plan.

Insurers cannot discriminate against you for having a pre-existing condition, and can only vary rates within a narrow range.



new topics

top topics
 
0

log in

join