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Heat related deaths

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posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 06:41 AM
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It's summer and it's going to get hotter.

Lets say it is 105 degrees outside...

Lets also say you go outside in that 105 degree weather...

How many hours would it take before you die from hyperthermia?

I remember suffering from symptoms of a heatstroke when I was younger. But I don't remember for how long I was outside.




posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 07:07 AM
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I live in Texas and we've had 100+ days for the last 4 days here. Since my job has me outside half of the time I make sure I drink lots of water to stay hydrated. I haven't had any heat exhaustion yet and it has hit 105 this week but I also make sure I seek shade under a tree, too.

Staying hydrated is extremely important. Good thread!



posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 07:42 AM
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It depends on a number of factors - your personal health, hydration levels (as texasgirl so kindly pointed out), humidity levels, activity levels, etc.

If you are smart about it, you can stay outside in this weather indefinitely. Shade, water, and little activity (or frequent breaks from activity) are the way to go. In a worst case scenario (example: out of shape, playing tennis in the sun, not drinking water), I have seen heat stroke pop up in as little as 30 minutes.



posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 06:19 PM
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reply to post by WarJohn
 


Wear a hat, preferably light-colored, that has a few ventilation holes, etc. Take breaks now and then. If you're outside in the heat and exerting yourself, stopping sweating is an ominous sign.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 08:12 AM
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I wanted to add that in addition to water, don't forget electrolytes! Too much water & not enough electrolytes can be dangerous, even deadly.

Just a few weeks ago, a paddler in the Texas Water Safari died from Hyponatremia (low blood sodium). It was the first death in the race's 50 year history.

Stay safe out there!

OiO



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 09:47 AM
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Originally posted by Uphill
reply to post by WarJohn
 


Wear a hat, preferably light-colored, that has a few ventilation holes, etc. Take breaks now and then. If you're outside in the heat and exerting yourself, stopping sweating is an ominous sign.


wear a silver foil hat with silver foil and silver foil clothes.

they reflect sunlight and stop your temperature rising.

also wear a cwet towel underneath the hat...evaporation from the towel will keep you kool.

wear clothes drenched in water...as it EVAPORATES it COOLS YOU.



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