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HAARP causing people to hear things inside their heads?

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posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by DaveNorris
 


Tinnitus is what I brought up a while back in this thread. That is the most common cause for ringing, but can also cause other types of "noise" in the ear.




posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by tdlikin
reply to post by Bedlam
 


Bedlam, an update for you on biophoton


You emit photons all the time, since you're not at absolute zero.

Nonetheless, this has nothing to do with HAARP, or "artificial telepathy", if it actually exists, and if it is anything more than random photon emission from natural biological processes, like, say, ATP converting to ADP, or some random byproduct of electron transport on mitochondrial membranes.

Biophoton research is borderline woo.

Did you know that bees smell fear, and the human head weighs about eight pounds?



posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 


There is also this, it was posted by Wwu777 on ATS a while back.
Big Name Neuroscientist Announces Telepathy as Proven Fact



Well well, look what we have here. Dr. Michael Persinger, the famous Neuroscientist at Ontario University, an Atheist hailed by skeptics for his "God helmet" experiments as being evidence against NDE's being evidence for an afterlife, has turned the tables on his skeptic admirers by announcing that he has now discovered a proven telepathic link in his experiments. See his interview below.

God Helmet



posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 08:48 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 




The guys that make the LRAD had an ad gadget long ago that depended on mixing two beams of ultrasound near your head to recreate audible sound. It sort of worked. We had a demo unit for a while. But you'd have to run around chasing OP with a guitar-sound torture device. Not too likely.


I'm not sure if I follow what you're saying but this is very real. I found a better article on the same event. These sounds can be placed directly into your head and are, as you can see by the article. I thought the best part was where they all say they're doing us a favor by keeping noise pollution down (and putting it directly into our skull instead.)

Hear Voices? It May Be an Ad

The billboard uses technology manufactured by Holosonic that transmits an "audio spotlight" from a rooftop speaker so that the sound is contained within your cranium.


But if you're only directing that sound to a specific viewer, you're never going to hear a neighbor complaint from street vendors or pedestrians. The whole idea is to spare other people."


Mr. Pompei said the company also has tested retail deployments in grocery stores with Procter & Gamble and Kraft for customized audio messaging. So a customer, for example, looking to buy laundry detergent could suddenly hear the sound of gurgling water and thus feel compelled to buy Tide as a result of the sonic experience.



posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by knoledgeispower
reply to post by MemoryShock
 


There is also this, it was posted by Wwu777 on ATS a while back.


By reading that article, I can tell you that Dr Persinger doesn't understand what quantum entanglement means.



posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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Originally posted by luxordelphi
I'm not sure if I follow what you're saying but this is very real. I found a better article on the same event. These sounds can be placed directly into your head and are, as you can see by the article. I thought the best part was where they all say they're doing us a favor by keeping noise pollution down (and putting it directly into our skull instead.)


I'm not sure if Holosonic is the company that ended up with the technology. I know that LRAD Corporation used to be called something else - American Technology Corporation IIRC, and along the way they had this localized sound trick for advertising that they sold to another company when they became LRAD Corporation. We evaluated it for other purposes out at Redstone, where we found it to be a lot of fun to play with but not so practical for the other purposes they wanted to use it for.

I have heard it demonstrated years back at Hartsfield International, where they had it set up so that you could hear announcements for one of the subway trains, but only if you were in the queue for that one. If you moved away a few yards, nothing. Interesting but lots of issues.



posted on Jun, 28 2012 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


Have you read Michael A Persinger's papers on entanglement?

He published some 3 of them on the subject, all post-2000.

--

And on biophotons, months back you pointed on Schumann Resonances thread to Kaznacheyev's quartz vs glass cell culture experiment.

Where one type of material filters part of spectrum and the other not.

Kaznecheyev experiment was a rehashed, new study based on the founder's experiments, namely Russian-German Alexander Gurvich.

He called it Mitogenetic Radiation.

Plus, there is a Western backer of biophotons as NOT a mere byproduct of metabolism.

Guenter Albrecht-Buehler, biophysicist at Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago Illinois

He started his studies on biophoton during the 90's



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 02:44 AM
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Originally posted by exzgtct
reply to post by Bedlam
 


Have you read Michael A Persinger's papers on entanglement?

He published some 3 of them on the subject, all post-2000.


Quantum entanglement is something you don't get by putting a magnetic field around someone and flashing light in their eyes. If that's what he thinks entanglement is, he needs to get away from psych experiments and do some time in a physics lab.

You don't get to observe something you think is "spooky action at a distance" then claim entanglement based on what you'd like the explanation to be. Entanglement is a technical term with a very specific meaning.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 02:50 AM
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Originally posted by exzgtctAnd on biophotons, months back you pointed on Schumann Resonances thread to Kaznacheyev's quartz vs glass cell culture experiment.

Where one type of material filters part of spectrum and the other not.

Kaznecheyev experiment was a rehashed, new study based on the founder's experiments, namely Russian-German Alexander Gurvich.

He called it Mitogenetic Radiation.


The context was that it was one of Tom Bearden's pet projects, which is not a save from accusations of woo by any stretch of the imagination. Tom is a woo-slinger par excellence. In this case, it's the foundation of Tom's "anything can be healed by reversing biophotons in time, which will make the organism automatically heal itself by going back in time to a point where it was whole". So you get time travel AND biophotons, which is cool, since biophotons doesn't smack of woo badly enough on its own.

Even better, Tom claims that if you turn on his biophoton reverser with nothing in the chamber, you will get monsters from the id coming out. No lie. He doesn't say that much, but he did once, and we got the entire dump on the Cthulhu-like monster they had to chase down and kill because someone thought of it while the thing was running empty.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 03:31 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


Here's one of his first articles, strikingly the same nature of observations as Gurvich, Kaznacheyev, Fritz Albert-Popp and many others

Guenter Albrecht-Buehler published in 1992 @ PNAS.

www.pnas.org/content/89/17/8288.abstract

1.
PNAS September 1, 1992 vol. 89 no. 17 8288-8292

Rudimentary form of cellular "vision"

1. G Albrecht-Buehler
- Author Affiliations
1.
Department of Cell, Molecular and Structural Biology, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL 60611.

Abstract

BHK cells were inoculated sparsely on one face ("sparse- or s-face") of a thin glass film whose opposite face was covered with a 2- to 3-day-old confluent layer of BHK cells ("confluent- or c-face"). After 7 hr of attaching and spreading in the absence of visible light, most of the cells on the s-face traversed with their long axes the direction of the whorls of the confluent cells on the c-face directly opposed. The effect was inhibited by a thin metal coating of the glass films. The results suggest that the cells were able to detect the orientation of others by signals that penetrated glass but not thin metallic films and, therefore, appeared to be carried by electromagnetic radiation. In contrast, the effect was not influenced by a thin coat of silicone on the glass, suggesting that the wavelength of this radiation is likely to be in the red to infrared range. The ability of cells to detect the direction of others by electromagnetic signals points to a rudimentary form of cellular "vision."



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:15 AM
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Originally posted by exzgtct
reply to post by Bedlam
 


Here's one of his first articles, strikingly the same nature of observations as Gurvich, Kaznacheyev, Fritz Albert-Popp and many others


And again, this corresponds to HAARP, people hearing things in their heads from satellites, schizophrenia and the like - how?



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


Because they're legit effects already in the literature that some academic circles seem to refuse to accept or pretend it's not there.

The only textbooks on biophotons looks to be by Fritz Albert-Popp and his network or researchers, mostly by World Scientific at their Singapore offices.

They're not in widespread use, to make knowledge dissemination worse...

There's a new out by Dutch ([Roeland/Eduard] Van Wijk) duo from Springer, let's see how that goes.

It may join as a pure biophysical signalling method in addition to classic, accepted mix of biochem/biophys signalling of electric potentials and pure "lock and key/docking", G proteins of biochemistry

Also, there's non thermal effects, that causes much irritation to cell phone industry.

Non ionising radiation and non thermal effects = taboo to some.

The big, academic BioInitiative 2007 report went ignored by IEEE, and mocked by academic circles of industry.

In the same city of Buehler, Rush University at Chicago researchers again replicated electromagnetic signalling research.

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1567539407000163

Bioelectrochemistry

Volume 71, Issue 2, November 2007, Pages 142–148

Evidence for non-chemical, non-electrical intercellular signaling in intestinal epithelial cells

* Ashkan Farhadi
* Christopher Forsyth,
* Ali Banan,
* Maliha Shaikh,
* Phillip Engen,
* Jeremy Z. Fields,
* Ali Keshavarzian

* Section of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA

* Received 25 August 2006. Revised 16 February 2007. Accepted 2 March 2007. Available online 12 March 2007.

Abstract

Synchrony between mechanically separated biological systems is well known. We posed the question: can cells induce synchronous behavior in neighboring cells which are mechanically separated and which cannot communicate via chemical or electrical mechanisms. Caco-2 cell cultures were divided into three groups. “Inducer” cells were exposed to H2O2. “Detector” cells were placed in separate containers near the inducer cells but were not exposed to H2O2. Control cells were exposed to fresh media and were kept in a distant laboratory area. Samples were measured for total protein concentration, NFκB activation and structural changes, 10, 30 and 60 min after exposure respectively. Exposing inducer cells to H2O2 resulted in a significant reduction in total protein content (− 50%), an increase in nuclear NFκB activation (+ 38%), and structural damage (56%) compared to controls. There was a similar reduction in total protein content (− 48%), increase in the nuclear fraction of NFκB (+ 35%) and structural damage (25%) in detector cells. These findings provide evidence in support of a non-chemical, non-electrical communication. This signaling system possibly plays a role in synchronous, stimulus-appropriate cell responses to noxious stimuli and may explain a number of cellular behaviors that are hard to explain based only on conventional cell signaling systems.

Keywords

* Intercellular communication;
* Cell–cell communication;
* NFκB;
* Tight junction;
* Cell signaling;
* Biophotonics



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:13 AM
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Originally posted by exzgtct
Because they're legit effects already in the literature that some academic circles seem to refuse to accept or pretend it's not there.



Nu?


I know it's often offensive to the moderators to answer in a single sentence, but in this case, I'm down to a one word answer.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 10:13 PM
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Originally posted by Bedlam
Ah, yes. A psychologist whose claim is that "I read about physics stuff on the net - how are we to know this isn't why crazy people hear voices?" From globalresearch.ca no less. Why not go a bit lower and get some from Educate Yourself? I particularly liked the article on the holy hand grenades.


Not credible by association is poor logic and I am going to jump out on a limb and assume that you know that. The paper is reasonable precisely because it is suggesting that the writers of the DSM could not have predicted the advancement of technology for such symptoms to be an absolute indication of mental illness...especially when there is technology available in the private sector that can be used by any disgruntled family member to induce the described symptoms without being implicated by either the inductee or anyone else. The paper is very reasonable. Liken it to hand grenades all you want, I'm gonna go with the idea that it is impossible to know the human experience to such an extent as to be able to diagnose the mental state of an individual into a stigmatized label that is still misunderstood and misdiagnosed. Seriously...schizophrenia is likely one of the only diagnosis's that actually prevents people from taking you seriously ever again (though India and their attitude toward the 'disease' is something quite different and worth discussing if we were to continue down this path)...




I counter you with the tale of James Tilly Mathews, who pretty much covered the entire spectrum of schizophrenic complaints from gang stalking, to implants, to remote manipulation of his behavior and (drum roll) being caused to hear noises and voices in his head by means of a technical device, at the behest of a secret governmental agency. In the 1800's.


I see what you did there...cute.



A paper from the 30s on stimulating animals with radio? Come now. Shocking a guinea pig's butt is a bit different from having hordes of mindless slaves doing the Imhotep two-step yesss maasssster yesss massster


The paper is relevant in that it shows the timeline for this type of experiment. It also shows that Yale was involved in such things at that time...which establishes a timeline (which isn't surprising but the fact that there is something to point to works more than not having something). Remember Dr. Jose Delgado and the remote controlled bull? The doctor worked at Yale. There is definite progression from the stimulation of a 'guinea pigs butt' to the stopping of a charging bull via remote control. Further, the doctor has some very interesting thoughts and quotes regarding his opinion on who should be allowed to control human minds...



Understand the research you do. Who's the source? Is it even relevant, or is it just full of sciencey terms you got word matches on?


I understand enough to know that there is nothing as of yet that can be considered 100% proof. I understand enough to know that even presenting this topic is enough to be ridiculed and mocked despite the varied types of evidence in existence to seriously consider this topic. I understand that just coming at a topic with a hint of authority, be it earnest or mockery in nature, can determine how someone coming across the information for the first time will interpret the information and the amount of time subsequently spent considering it...or not.

Regarding icaact..I am fully aware of the possibility for scam and never intended on placing any hopes on them further than another step. There are several subtle intangibles which make this advantageous and none of them involve the expectation of undeniable proof.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 11:54 PM
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Originally posted by MemoryShock
Not credible by association is poor logic and I am going to jump out on a limb and assume that you know that.


One doesn't often find pearls in swine pens. That doesn't mean there are none, but the likelihood is low. In this case, it's globalresearch.ca. While they're not at the bottom of the heap, they're close. In a pure sense, guilt by association may be poor logic, but in this case, what you've got is a website that aggregates viewpoints of a certain type. It's actively choosing for sensationalism. It's partisan. That is why you want to see a disclosure of who researchers are associated with in scholarly papers, so that you can judge association. If not, what you get are papers that say smoking is good for you published by the Tobacco Foundation. Would you assume that paper was done from a neutral viewpoint? One assumes not.



The paper is reasonable precisely because it is suggesting that the writers of the DSM could not have predicted the advancement of technology for such symptoms to be an absolute indication of mental illness...especially when there is technology available in the private sector that can be used by any disgruntled family member to induce the described symptoms without being implicated by either the inductee or anyone else. The paper is very reasonable.


But actually, it isn't at all. It's terribly done. I'm going to go out on a limb and see if you can identify just why it's bad. Take a look at it again from a neutral POV.

Which technology do you feel an average disgruntled family member can get to "induce voices"?



Liken it to hand grenades all you want,


You really ought to go read the holy hand grenade articles on Educate Yourself. The website takes this seriously. In like fashion, globalresearch.ca takes bogus research seriously without questioning it at all. This is another example, albeit not quite so blatant.



I'm gonna go with the idea that it is impossible to know the human experience


I'm gonna go with the idea that if you think there are ninjas in the trees or Satan's talking to you from the sink drain that you're probably not functioning on a higher plane that others simply can't understand, and are more likely to be malfunctioning in some way.



I see what you did there...cute.


It's not just cute - it's exactly on point. Mathews thought he was being controlled by a technical machine from a distance called the "AirLoom", which could manipulate thought, cause people to hear voices, noise, be distracted, be "thought controlled" and so on. He also believed in gang stalking, implants, and electronic harassment, albeit a sort of steampunk version. I do not believe that there are many aspects of schizophrenic paranoia in this genre that he did not describe. In 1810.



The paper is relevant in that it shows the timeline for this type of experiment. It also shows that Yale was involved in such things at that time...which establishes a timeline (which isn't surprising but the fact that there is something to point to works more than not having something). Remember Dr. Jose Delgado and the remote controlled bull? The doctor worked at Yale. There is definite progression from the stimulation of a 'guinea pigs butt' to the stopping of a charging bull via remote control. Further, the doctor has some very interesting thoughts and quotes regarding his opinion on who should be allowed to control human minds...


There's a large large unwarranted leap from remote nerve stimulation either in your first paper or by Delgado, and "mind control" or causing people to hear voices from a distance using some magical telepathy from satellites. It's a huge qualitative difference. Vast.



I understand enough to know that there is nothing as of yet that can be considered 100% proof.


Well, given that there's a somewhat common mental illness that has traditionally produced behavioral aspects wherein the person tends to blame outside influences for their behavior, down to Matthews expressly describing nearly every facet of the modern "electronic harassment" experience back in 1810, it's a short leap to think that people who hear voices are suffering from schizophrenia or something similar instead of being targeted for unknown reason by the government. Again, if you were the president of the Republic of Poland or something, it might make sense, but large groups of citizens of relatively low sociopolitical influence, at great expense and with a huge commitment of manpower, to no particular end? It doesn't make sense.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 02:48 AM
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reply to post by autoprotolysis
 


There was an X-files episode covering this , it would cause a man to go mad, he had to go somewhere in a certain direction, it had something to do with haarp for sure but also maybe the energy grid of earth's lay lines.

I get voices in my head, I assume it's because of fillings, and I'm picking up on someone's cordless home phone conversations. Some pretty weird stuff, been getting it since 1994 or sooner, maybe about the time I left the navy.
I suspect someone may be beaming stuff to my brain on purpose, I had the LA times syndicate/ time warner on my ass and still do. I could tell people stories , but they are so unbelievable they'd think I was crazy so I keep it to myself. You can learn about such devices though. Consumertronix in Albuquerque sells things that do have to do with this. I think you just speak into a mic and whoever it's pointed at will hear you.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 


Artificial Telepathy- This sounds the closest as to what is going on with me. I feel like a human repeater..everything I hear with my ears, see with my eyes, think etc..goes back to other humans that I am connected to. I was taken from a Bridge in Charleston, West Virginia by some-kind of beings and put on another Bridge about 1 or 2 miles from where I was located. I was walking from the Amtrak Station across Bridge to what I thought were hotels..I should have taken a Taxi..but for whatever reason..I attempted to walk. The Amtrak Station was getting ready to close..that is why I took off on foot...I was found walking around in shock..I had to return to my hometown..I never made it to my duty station in Piegan, Montana. I was going to work for US Customs and Border Patrol in Piegan, Montana.

I may have had a black man following me in Charlottesville, Virginia...I was waiting on the next train to arrive and it was raining outside..the train arrived and the Large Black Man wearing a rain coat and something black coming out of his ear..some-kind of phone or communications something..I overheard him say..Montanawolf is Boarding...I only use this on a Customs and Border Patrol Site..and Americans Singles Site..I just looked at him and got on the Train..I do not know if he boarded the train..This is the only point..where I can remember..I may have had the Government following me..why I dont know..I was going to work for them.

As for me being taken from the Bridge in Charleston, West Virginia..my mind is blank..other than knowing I was taken up..and then I like woke up on another Bridge..I was found by a cop..I was in shock..I didnt say anything to him other than to please take me to a hotel..there is a police communications record somewhere in Charleston, West Virginia sometime in Sept-2006 where they did a female transport.

I remember feeling dirty and wanted to throw my clothes away..but I didnt have any other clothes with me..they were en-route to Montana...I was afraid to even get in the shower at the hotel..I was at some small hotel connected to a hospital..where family members of the patients stayed..I began calling home begging for someone to come and get me out of West Virginia..

If this is the problem I have..how do I block this or turn this off?



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:23 PM
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Originally posted by Bedlam
One doesn't often find pearls in swine pens. That doesn't mean there are none, but the likelihood is low. In this case, it's globalresearch.ca. While they're not at the bottom of the heap, they're close. In a pure sense, guilt by association may be poor logic, but in this case, what you've got is a website that aggregates viewpoints of a certain type. It's actively choosing for sensationalism. It's partisan. That is why you want to see a disclosure of who researchers are associated with in scholarly papers, so that you can judge association. If not, what you get are papers that say smoking is good for you published by the Tobacco Foundation. Would you assume that paper was done from a neutral viewpoint? One assumes not.


I see your point but I fail to see why "an aggregate of certain types of viewpoints" can only be attributed to this website...bias is discussed as a problem for many things right up to and including the Citizens United ruling. Even in the world of science we see big pharma paying not only politicians but medical professionals to represent their brands positively which invariably end up effecting the health of people. The situation is so ridiculous that mental disorders are being diagnosed as early as 2 and a half years old.

Still, the website posts many things that are sourced and true even if it tends to not be mainstream. I'm not going to call it unbiased but then again neither will I call mainstream unbiased.



But actually, it isn't at all. It's terribly done. I'm going to go out on a limb and see if you can identify just why it's bad. Take a look at it again from a neutral POV.


I do not have the same opinion. It's not going to win any awards for structure but it utilizes supportable fact with valid opinion/supposition.



Which technology do you feel an average disgruntled family member can get to "induce voices"?


Will get back to you on this one; I can't find the link.



You really ought to go read the holy hand grenade articles on Educate Yourself. The website takes this seriously. In like fashion, globalresearch.ca takes bogus research seriously without questioning it at all. This is another example, albeit not quite so blatant.


So you are going to use an article on one website to discredit an entirely different website? Seriously?




I'm gonna go with the idea that if you think there are ninjas in the trees or Satan's talking to you from the sink drain that you're probably not functioning on a higher plane that others simply can't understand, and are more likely to be malfunctioning in some way.


I'll agree with that. But neither scenario is being presented here. Interesting though...I did have a dream several years ago where ninjas were on the rafters of my friends house...it was an epic battle. But it was a dream...



It's not just cute - it's exactly on point. Mathews thought he was being controlled by a technical machine from a distance called the "AirLoom", which could manipulate thought, cause people to hear voices, noise, be distracted, be "thought controlled" and so on. He also believed in gang stalking, implants, and electronic harassment, albeit a sort of steampunk version. I do not believe that there are many aspects of schizophrenic paranoia in this genre that he did not describe. In 1810.


I still can't believe this happened though it is certainly sourced. I still think that the claims of this nature from someone two hundred years ago are different than now. It's simply incomparable. The technology is different, basic education is different, the exposure to technology is different, the food is different, the air is different. The case is even cited as being the first documented case of paranoid schizophrenia and even they say retroactive diagnosis is not accurate. Discounting the claims of remote neural harassment based on an un provable biography from two hundred years ago is insane…or calculated argument. Either way, it isn’t valid.

Funny synchronicity though, which I think you might find as amusing as I did- the airloom Tily spoke of is now the name of a mobile technology services firm. The irony is pristine.

Yet another funny synchronicity…Tilly was committed to Bethlem Royal Hospital…otherwise referred to as “Bedlam”…



There's a large large unwarranted leap from remote nerve stimulation either in your first paper or by Delgado, and "mind control" or causing people to hear voices from a distance using some magical telepathy from satellites. It's a huge qualitative difference. Vast.

The huge qualitative difference is inherent in the decades in between. Granted, if I intended the three instances to stand alone be necessary logical conclusions from the other than you have a point. But these three instances aren’t the only three instances available. My intent was merely to show similar historical precedence to show that claims of this nature aren’t assuming a technology that sprouted up over night.

Magical? Really? I noticed that you haven’t been mentioning the newsvine articles. Is there a reason for that?



Well, given that there's a somewhat common mental illness that has traditionally produced behavioral aspects wherein the person tends to blame outside influences for their behavior, down to Matthews expressly describing nearly every facet of the modern "electronic harassment" experience back in 1810, it's a short leap to think that people who hear voices are suffering from schizophrenia or something similar instead of being targeted for unknown reason by the government. Again, if you were the president of the Republic of Poland or something, it might make sense, but large groups of citizens of relatively low sociopolitical influence, at great expense and with a huge commitment of manpower, to no particular end? It doesn't make sense.


You have to field test it somewhere…
edit on Sat, 30 Jun 2012 22:25:19 -0500 by MemoryShock because: Tags



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:33 PM
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Originally posted by Apollo7
If this is the problem I have..how do I block this or turn this off?


I don't know. Neither psychiatry or conspiracy theory have an answer for that question. Would need to know more as well...I find myself in the same predicament as everyone when trying to ascertain if someone else is going through remote influence of whatever means despite my claims - I can't validate someone else's experience - especially on two paragraphs...


Hence the predicament...



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:10 AM
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Originally posted by MemoryShock

I see your point but I fail to see why "an aggregate of certain types of viewpoints" can only be attributed to this website...bias is discussed as a problem for many things right up to and including the Citizens United ruling. I'm not going to call it unbiased but then again neither will I call mainstream unbiased.


True, but you have to admit, they're looking for CT oriented viewpoints and articles. I can't cover ALL websites or news outlets. We're talking about this one, and conspiracy is their genre. Thus you're not likely to find an expose on schizophrenia being relatively accurately diagnosed, but you can bet they'll look for one saying it's an evil government conspiracy.




I do not have the same opinion. It's not going to win any awards for structure but it utilizes supportable fact with valid opinion/supposition.


You think so? You read it, and you think it uses supportable fact? That it's logical in its conclusions? You don't see any issues at all? For my part, I seriously can't see how it got published in a refereed journal as purported. Now, it's true that you get some of this sort of thing in medical pubs because the referees don't understand physics, and tend to pass it on without comment.



So you are going to use an article on one website to discredit an entirely different website? Seriously?


Simile. Perhaps I wasn't clear. globalresearch.ca, IN SIMILAR FASHION TO OTHER CT SITES OF THIS TYPE (highlighted the cue here), tends not to question bogus physics, if it supports their viewpoint. The article you're quoting is full of it, but they aren't going (what!?) it's all (OMG!). If they want to be taken more seriously, they ought to be less credulous. As they're not, I tend to lump them with other sites of like type.



I'll agree with that. But neither scenario is being presented here. Interesting though...I did have a dream several years ago where ninjas were on the rafters of my friends house...it was an epic battle. But it was a dream...


But to the rest of us, there's not a lot of difference in hearing voices that tell you things (artificial telepathy et al) and ninjas in trees.



The case is even cited as being the first documented case of paranoid schizophrenia and even they say retroactive diagnosis is not accurate. Discounting the claims of remote neural harassment based on an un provable biography from two hundred years ago is insane…or calculated argument. Either way, it isn’t valid.


Of course it's valid. This guy was documented in detail by his doctor, and published at the time. It's not fiction, or reinterpreted 90 years down the road, it's written by his contemporary. Now, you can quibble as to whether Matthews was schizophrenic, although I can't see how, but you can't dismiss his delusions as being retroactive fiction. He actually stated these things, and in great detail, with drawings he made of his delusions. And his delusions are, remarkably, identical with those of current schizophrenics who believe they are being stalked and harassed by technological means. Implants, gang stalking, mind control by machine, the whole enchilada. What's amazing is the number of correspondences between Matthews' writings about his delusions and what you hear today. All the way down to his torment by people with "magnetic influence" in adjoining apartments.



Yet another funny synchronicity…Tilly was committed to Bethlem Royal Hospital…otherwise referred to as “Bedlam”…


Weird, innit? In this case, I picked the nickname up in the military, it was a lot better than the previous one.





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