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Syria's stonehenge - Mysterious ruins in desert could be 10,000 years old

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posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:16 PM
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www.dailymail.co.uk...





A mysterious ancient building in Syria, described as a 'landscape for the dead' could be as old as 10,000 years ago - far older than the Great Pyramid. But scientists have been unable to explore the ruins, unearthed in 2009, because of the conflict in the region. The strange stone formations were uncovered in 2009, by archaeologist Robert Mason of the Royal Ontario Museum, who came across stone lines, circles, and tombs in a near-lifeless area of desert. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... 1yrFGhhEJ


Pretty cool find. These were found in 2009, but scientists have yet to investigate them further. They look like some residential housing from back in the day.
edit on 083030p://6America/ChicagoMon, 25 Jun 2012 20:18:25 -0500 by THE_PROFESSIONAL because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:21 PM
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Looks nice. I wonder what we could learn from this.

It looks like it would be residential housing of the day but i know some idiot will call it some super temple to some god nobody knows about



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:23 PM
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Really sh%$s me when things like this can't be available for investigation and the world to see, so much history lost already I just hope someone has marked it to avoid on any upcoming bombing raids.

I'm sure someone has had a decent look through by now.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:24 PM
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Humanity is a species with racial amnesia. If we could only put primitive things such as war and religion behind us there is no telling what we could find. Not to mention how fast humanity could advance.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


I've always wanted to ask are u of any relation to Zack Galifinakis by any chance if that is you in your avatar??


Back on topic, I can't wait to see what discoveries come from this...I'm always hoping something lifechanging is found but we never now what to expect.

Wow being that old I'd be afraid to go across the bridge in the photo, the stairs look like one hell of a workout.

edit on 25-6-2012 by ElOmen because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:29 PM
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I don't know about a "stonehenge".


In a talk in 2010, Mason said he felt like he’d stumbled onto England’s Salisbury Plain, where Stonehenge is located, leading to the formations being dubbed “Syria’s Stonehenge.” Mason also talked about the monastery, Deir Mar Musa. Early work on the building likely began in the late 4th or early 5th century. It was occupied until the 1800s, though damaged repeatedly by earthquakes. Following refurbishment in the 1980s and 1990s, it became active again. Mason thinks the monastery was originally a Roman watchtower that was partially destroyed by an earthquake and then rebuilt. The compound was enlarged, with new structures added until it reached the size of the modern complex, clinging to a dry cliff face in the desert about 50 miles north of Damascus. Mason was searching Roman watchtowers when he came across the stone lines, circles, and possible tombs.


Maybe a roman watchtower?

phys.org...



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by WorkingClassMan
Really sh%$s me when things like this can't be available for investigation and the world to see, so much history lost already I just hope someone has marked it to avoid on any upcoming bombing raids.

I'm sure someone has had a decent look through by now.


Some of the worlds greatest archaeological sites lay beneath some of the worlds greatest cities. Truth.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:31 PM
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Originally posted by kdog1982
I don't know about a "stonehenge".


Maybe a roman watchtower?

phys.org...


Bit big for a watchtower.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:37 PM
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Originally posted by BulletShogun

Originally posted by kdog1982
I don't know about a "stonehenge".


Maybe a roman watchtower?

phys.org...


Bit big for a watchtower.


I see you did not quote the quote........

Maybe you should read the article.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:43 PM
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Originally posted by kdog1982

Originally posted by BulletShogun

Originally posted by kdog1982
I don't know about a "stonehenge".


Maybe a roman watchtower?

phys.org...


Bit big for a watchtower.


I see you did not quote the quote........

Maybe you should read the article.


My bad lol. I scrolled and saw your comment. Then I posted my thought



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


Very surprised they have withstood , the ravages of time..........

Nice find.

S&F



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:54 PM
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reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


That would put them around 8,000 BC and within striking distance of the Turkish site as far as age.

Göbekli Tepe

The oldest structures belong to what archaeologists call the early Pre-Pottery Neolithic A period, which ended around 9000 B.C. Strangely enough, the later remains, which date to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period, or about 8000 B.C., are less elaborate. The earliest levels contain most of the T-shaped pillars and animal sculptures.



Great find.
Thanks for posting it.

S & F



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 09:03 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Thanks, your welcome, I am still wondering about the ages of these structures and how reliable the dating tech is. I still would like to know even the dates of the pyramids



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


I'm looking forward to reading what you find.
Keep us posted.






posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 09:42 PM
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Something sinister lies under the Euphrates River, which meanders through Syria. Read the book of Revelation, about the angels bound at the Euphrates River. When these angels, or messengers of doom, are released, they create a terrible destructive force.

You have to wonder how and when these prophecies will be fulfilled. It could be soon.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:44 PM
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There is some more excellent information here at wiki:

Monastery of Saint Moses

Also more photos and a history of the area.

Coordinates for Google Earth: 34° 1′ 18″ N, 36° 50′ 32″ E

Excellent find. S & F.

I really think Syria probably holds some of the best ancient history there is to find in the world.
edit on 25-6-2012 by Julie Washington because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


This is just beautiful. All the ancient places (that survive I suppose) for us to ponder all seem so at tune with nature, the environment and time (longevity). Built to last from what was available, to say "they do not make things like they used too" is an understatement.

Thank you!

S&F.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
www.dailymail.co.uk...






Looks like it used to be beach front property



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 01:06 AM
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Originally posted by Shadow Herder

Originally posted by WorkingClassMan
Really sh%$s me when things like this can't be available for investigation and the world to see, so much history lost already I just hope someone has marked it to avoid on any upcoming bombing raids.

I'm sure someone has had a decent look through by now.


Some of the worlds greatest archaeological sites lay beneath some of the worlds greatest cities. Truth.


Not sure what you're getting at but I'm sure most of them have been investigated in one way or anther too.

Doesn't Syria have its own archaeologists who can look into things a bit more freely even in these tough times.
edit on 26-6-2012 by WorkingClassMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 02:48 AM
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Originally posted by BulletShogun
Looks nice. I wonder what we could learn from this.

It looks like it would be residential housing of the day but i know some idiot will call it some super temple to some god nobody knows about


i was just thinking exactly the same thing. so much for 'learned' archaeology when all the 'experts' ever tell us is that they think it's a temple or ceremonial centre.

great find op, shame the only link is from the daily fail though.


edit: too big to be a temple, must be a monastery then...

edit on 26-6-2012 by ladyteeny because: sarcasm added



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