An Honest Question to Freemasons

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posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 12:59 PM
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Gentlemen,

I have a serious, honest question about your Order... what is it, exactly, that Freemasonry is and tries to do? I am genuinely curious about freemasonry and do not put a lot of creedence into the information I've read on it from Wikipedia, and trying to find out anything about it on ATS usually leads to some kind of vicious back and forth between Masons and those oppossed to Masonry.

So what say you? What, in a nutshell and as far as you can reasonably tell me, is Freemasonry about?

Thanks for your time and responses.




posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:04 PM
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My grandfather was a Freemason. He was one of the kindest, most generous person I've ever known. I have a hard time believing he would be involved in anything nefarious.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


I've almost always heard good things about the men involved in Freemasonry, hence why I am asking this question. The Interenet is good for getting an all around 'feel' for something, but I'd rather hear about this from people who are members.

Like I said, I posted this for my information and not to start another 'anti-Masonry' thread.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:07 PM
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Originally posted by Dreine
Gentlemen,

I have a serious, honest question about your Order... what is it, exactly, that Freemasonry is and tries to do? I am genuinely curious about freemasonry and do not put a lot of creedence into the information I've read on it from Wikipedia, and trying to find out anything about it on ATS usually leads to some kind of vicious back and forth between Masons and those oppossed to Masonry.

So what say you? What, in a nutshell and as far as you can reasonably tell me, is Freemasonry about?

Thanks for your time and responses.


It's a non-denominational moral fraternity that acts as an adjunct to the faiths of its members. It tries (and usually succeeds) in making good men better, of greater utility to themselves, to their families and loved ones and to society in general.

It is not a faith or religion. It is not a cover group for the 'elites' of the world. It is not a way to dodge speeding tickets and the like by being part of an identifiable group

HTH
Fitz



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:08 PM
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Not all Freemasons are evil, plotting, crazed people that ATS makes them out to be.

I have known many Freemasons in my life time, who have all been hard workers - who ranged from wealthy, to poor.

Like with any secret group, or any group for that matter, there will always be bad eggs. Those who would do harm over good.

Just because a certain percent of a group does something does not mean they all do it - or are even aware of it for that matter.

Judging an entire group on the "here-say" actions of a smaller percentage is unjust and irrational. That would be like saying all budhists are evil, because you saw a monk kill someone.
edit on 25-6-2012 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:11 PM
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Thank you for your responses!

So from what I gather, it's a group of like-minded men, perhaps who share a commonality of professions, who try to be active in their communities and make them better?

Additionally, and for reference, many years ago my father was approached about becoming a Mason and he decline, namely due to some personal issues he had with some of the oaths taken by the order (my father happens to be a deacon of a Baptist church). Just so happens I've found myself wondering if Freemasonry is something that I want to look into or not.
edit on 25-6-2012 by Dreine because: additional information



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by Dreine
 


The primary philosophy is Brotherly Love, Relief, and Truth. Some would also say Charity, Love, and Faith are equally important to a Mason.

The only mission Freemasons have is to do our best to improve society in our respective communities. My home lodge hosts a charity drive nearly every month, for some reason or another and the turn out is always pretty decent.

Aside from raising money for the various charities we support, many Brothers find that one of the greatest pleasures in Masonry is joining the officers line and volunteering time with their Lodge. There is no benefit from doing so other than a mans willingness to help his Brothers, and study what it means to be a Mason.

There is no one singular set path a Mason must follow. After the Sublime Degree is conferred, a Mason takes his journey into his own hands, equipped with the tools of the Craft, and lives his life the way he best sees fit.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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Originally posted by Dreine
Thank you for your responses!

So from what I gather, it's a group of like-minded men, perhaps who share a commonality of professions, who try to be active in their communities and make them better?

Additionally, and for reference, many years ago my father was approached about becoming a Mason and he decline, namely due to some personal issues he had with some of the oaths taken by the order (my father happens to be a deacon of a Baptist church). Just so happens I've found myself wondering if Freemasonry is something that I want to look into or not.
edit on 25-6-2012 by Dreine because: additional information


I think you hit it on the head. I know my opinion isn't very helpful, as I am female and not a Freemason. But all the men I've known in my life who are or we're Freemasons have been outstanding community members who were always helping others. Just my opinion.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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reply to post by Dreine
 


Freemasonry doesnt recruit, so keep in mind:

2B1ASK1



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:22 PM
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Freemasonry is a fraternity.

Freemasonry has no 'wants'.

Freemasonry is a system of morality, veiled in allegory and revealed through symbols.




At least that's the party line.

What is the truth?


Freemasonry is a fraternity that only admits men of good report, who are vouched for by members, that of legal age (18 or 21 mileage may vary).

Freemasonry exists only to serve to help good men become better men, by teaching them moral lessons through symbols and lectures that are based upon the Volume of the Sacred Law (the Holy Bible in the US).

A mason must believe in a Supreme Being. It follows that the Supreme Being must be benevolent, otherwise there would be no point in teaching morality.

Sure, we have some strange rituals. They are no more bizarre than you would see at a Catholic mass, though.

Here are some of the symbols we use and the lesson they teach:

The Sqaure teaches us to deal squarely with others. (tell the truth, be fair, be up front)

The Level teaches us that all of mankind are equal and that we are all members of a family under the Fatherhood of God and we should love each other and treat each other with love.

The compass teaches us to 'circumscribe' our actions. In other words to try and actively subdue our baser passions by staying within a figurative circle of morality.

We don't pick and choose who will join. We don't recruit, We don't offer salvation or insurance. We don't discuss politics or debate the merits of religious dogma.

We do charity work, we have fellowship and we come to the aid of each other.

A mason can choose to leave the fraternity at any time and will not be penalized in any way.

We have no special say in society. We are admonished to be peaceable citizens and to follow the laws of the land. We are instructed to seek answers to our problems in scripture and we are encouraged to examine our lives from a larger perspective and see if we truly measure up to what we claim to be.

Usually masons meet one or two times a month for business meetings. Dues are $50 (in my lodge) to a few hundred per year in others.

Are there secret handshakes and passwords? Yes, but like everything else in masonry they are symbols. They symbolize our devotion to ourselves, our family, our brothers and to God. Those two things are the most misunderstood. They are not REAL secrets but they are symbols of our promise we make to our brothers, ourselves and God that we will try earnestly to become better men.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by W3RLIED2
 


About as good an answer as I could ask for, thanks!

Maybe doing some good in my community would help me feel a bit more... involved... in the world. Gotta admit that I've been a bit down lately, feeling like something just isn't quite there.

Appreciate the response!



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:24 PM
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It's a group of usually intelligent people that come together to help each other out and help the community. They are tied to oaths that they take within the lodges which they must respect with honor.

So, usually what happen is favoritism and elitism as they rarely help the community unless a mason is part of the people that need help.

By deduction, there must also be a lot of ego tripping since usually they are talented people. Secretly, many must shun upon the rest of the population but it is not part of the goal of freemasonry.

Mason also usually don't turn in other masons since many feel their lodge rules override legal rules concerning honor and fraternity.

Many people do not like masons because they wouldn't be talented or smart enough and many, like me, dislike masonry in general because of their secrecy, favoritism, elitism, etc.

Contrary to what they believe and try to achieve foolishly, I believe they are to the detriment of civilization and that the world would be much better off without them.

Join us or be crushed, must be historically rampant when it comes down to political, economical and intellectual progression. Firsthand, most masons respect masons more than non-masons.

The whole idea disgusts me, JFK didn't like it, I don't like it.
This doesn't mean masonry is only negative but I feel it outweighs the positive.
edit on 25-6-2012 by theMediator because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by emsed1
 


Thanks for the response and well-spoken answer!
So far, everything seems on the up-and-up... I'll continue to look into things and see if perhaps this is something I want in my life.

Thanks for the information gentlmen (and Lady)... it is appreciated.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by theMediator
 


JFK loved secrecy. The speach anti masons like to use was JFKs clever way of trying to increase government secrecy. It has nothing to do with Freemasonry at all.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by Dreine
 


This is part of what is wrong with the world.
You have no idea of who I am or what kind of a person I am.
Many people look for the quick fix rather than doing their own investigation, lazy lazy lazy.
I am a Master Mason only a 3rd degree, I can prove this to any other in darkness or light.
If you really wanna know and not be lied to, JOIN US!
We do not install tracking chips in you nor any other markings.

You just might like what you see and hear, if not, why worry about us?
We try not to initiate people who have only idle curiosity of the fraternity so, join for the cool new friends, the off the chain barbeques, the satisfaction of helping a total stranger possibly in their darkest time.
Although I am not an "active" officer in my lodge anymore, I still am well connected with many who are.
Any of which at a moments notice I would drop everything for them and vise versa.
Don't take my word for it though, DO YOUR OWN detective work.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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Also, as a Christian, I have found nothing whatsoever in Freemasonry that conflicts with my faith. In fact, I feel my walk with Christ has grown since I've become a mason a few years back. Heck, I even give a few sermons in church now and again!

There are Christian motifs in the ritual. Mostly they are in the side degrees of the York Rite.

I think you would find that Blue Lodge Freemasonry (the first three degrees) use many familiar themes from the Old Testament (at least in the US) and that York Rite tends to use more of the New Testament for it's degrees.

Now, don't take me the wrong way. You will never, ever be asked about your faith except when you are initiated. That is simply a question of whether you believe in a Supreme Being.

If you choose to continue through the York Rite, and ultimately receive the Order of the Temple (Masonic Knights Templar) you will have to profess that you are a Christian, or that you will swear to defend the Christian faith.

That is an appendent body, though.

The rituals are the cool part. Moving, dramatic, solemn stories and ceremonies that teach through (sometimes obscure) symbols. Just like it was said above once you are given the information it is up to you to decide how (or even if) to apply them in your life.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by Dreine
reply to post by W3RLIED2
 


About as good an answer as I could ask for, thanks!

Maybe doing some good in my community would help me feel a bit more... involved... in the world. Gotta admit that I've been a bit down lately, feeling like something just isn't quite there.

Appreciate the response!


No worries!

I want to take the time and say, thank you, for not coming at us with pre concieved notions, and for not being a jerk!! I will gladly answer any and all questions you have, Dreine.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by W3RLIED2
 


are you a freemason!? what is your rank?



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by maes9
 


I am, try me.

There is no ranks in masonry aside from the officers line. The appendant degrees hold no sway on a Masons status in the Order.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


how do you know that he was a freemason? did he ever say that what his religion was? and what was his hobbies? and his attitude towards God and satan or .....

W3LIEDTO I will appreciate if you share these info too.
edit on 25-6-2012 by maes9 because: (no reason given)





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