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'Twisted light' carries 2.5 terabits of data per second

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posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:23 AM
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Researchers have clocked light beams made of "twisted" waves carrying 2.5 terabits of data - the capacity of more than 66 DVDs - per second.

The technique relies on manipulating what is known as the orbital angular momentum of the waves.

Recent work suggests that the trick could vastly boost the data-carrying capacity in wi-fi and optical fibres.


www.bbc.co.uk...

The wonders of science never cease to amaze me.

Every day something new crops up to stimulate the brain with the progress of scientists.




posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:29 AM
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If only there was a storage device capable of reading or writing at anything even close to these speeds..



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:33 AM
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keep getting 404 ..

even thou the link off the main BBC site is there.. odd..

here's another .. Infinite-capacity wireless vortex beams carry 2.5 terabits per second

Ohhh~!!! it's wireless transfer apparently !!


American and Israeli researchers have used twisted, vortex beams to transmit data at 2.5 terabits per second. As far as we can discern, this is the fastest wireless network ever created — by some margin. This technique is likely to be used in the next few years to vastly increase the throughput of both wireless and fiber-optic networks.





edit on 25-6-2012 by Komodo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:55 AM
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Yah, original article is a 404, but the keywords helped me find a few others about how this technology has been worked on over the past few years.

Star and flag. This directly impacts my profession and I am rather excited about it. Articles I found:

www.bbc.co.uk...

www.extremetech.com...



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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That is ridiculous.

I mean really, my fiber connection is 60MBS up and 60MBS down and that's fast as hell.

Could not imagine this.

However, with all things internet, it will be very dependent on hardware. Can only go as fast as your machine will allow.

~Tenth



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by TLomon
 


Thanks for that bit of info as those links lead me to some interesting aspects at the new journal of physics and the similar effect of radio waves....and obtaining infinite channels.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 12:34 PM
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Gizmodo

Now this is very interesting.
If they could adapt this to fiber technology somehow we could cram more bandwidth into existing fiber lines.



These twisted signals use orbital angular momentum (OAM) to cram much more data into a single stream. In current state-of-the-art transmission protocols (WiFi, LTE, COFDM), we only modulate the spin angular momentum (SAM) of radio waves, not the OAM. If you picture the Earth, SAM is our planet spinning on its axis, while OAM is our movement around the Sun. Basically, the breakthrough here is that researchers have created a wireless network protocol that uses both OAM and SAM.




BTW. Even if you could get the full 2.5 TB of data. You're hardware is still too slow.
In the seconds that it took to download the movie you're computer would be waiting to write the data to your hard drive.
lol



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


yes that is true but all of it is getting faster....ssd are what upto a screeching(halt) of 6gb/s is that correct....ok not quite 2.5 freakin tb/s but hey gettin there huh



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


My first Hard Drive (before, everything was on a 720kb floppy) was 40mb, and I thought, wow, I'll NEVER be able to use all that room. Never again will I think too much or too fast.

IPv6 is also supposed to allow the MTUs of interfaces to increase, leaving streaming everything to be a possibility.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by Druid42
 


Yeah I have about 8 Terrabites of storage right now in total on my home server.

It's about half full. Mostly with games and other things that are necessary to me when the world ends


If there's one thing I won't be is bored



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


And just think, when you fill it up, you'll be able to back it up
on a cloud in about 3.2 seconds!



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 04:40 PM
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Interesting!
I made a thread a while back about 'twisting wireless signals' and I just loved how low tech the solution was!
You might find it interesting, Wireless - One frequency- multiple signals - rotational.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower
reply to post by Druid42
 


Yeah I have about 8 Terrabites of storage right now in total on my home server.

It's about half full. Mostly with games and other things that are necessary to me when the world ends


If there's one thing I won't be is bored


I guess you must have one hell of a battery system or do a lot of fast cranking on a bike charging system?
(joke!)



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 04:47 PM
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So now you can exceed your monthly data allowance in about 0.002 seconds lol.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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Originally posted by EnigmaAgent

Researchers have clocked light beams made of "twisted" waves carrying 2.5 terabits of data - the capacity of more than 66 DVDs - per second.

The technique relies on manipulating what is known as the orbital angular momentum of the waves.

Recent work suggests that the trick could vastly boost the data-carrying capacity in wi-fi and optical fibres.


www.bbc.co.uk...

The wonders of science never cease to amaze me.

Every day something new crops up to stimulate the brain with the progress of scientists.


The trouble with this size of data transfer is the way it is addressed for memory storage purposes. Meaning we will need way beyond our current 64bit/128but proccessors to handle this. The trouble we run into at this stage is the physical ammount of connections we can get on one CPU. We are no longer confined by technology in processors but the physical build and connectivity.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by Druid42
 


Would actually be about 30 seconds.. but yeah still quite fast

2.5 terabits is 312GB per second, now we just need faster ssd drives. Lol.. Faster ssd drives.. I haven't even gotten to buy one yet they cost too damn much for one worth the space.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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Originally posted by Arekoteya
reply to post by Druid42
 


Would actually be about 30 seconds.. but yeah still quite fast

2.5 terabits is 312GB per second, now we just need faster ssd drives. Lol.. Faster ssd drives.. I haven't even gotten to buy one yet they cost too damn much for one worth the space.


SSD is no good with todays technology, we need to refine our microchip manufacturing first. Addressing for 2.5 TBits/sec is well beyond consumer electronics we have today.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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Originally posted by michael1983l

Originally posted by Arekoteya
reply to post by Druid42
 


Would actually be about 30 seconds.. but yeah still quite fast

2.5 terabits is 312GB per second, now we just need faster ssd drives. Lol.. Faster ssd drives.. I haven't even gotten to buy one yet they cost too damn much for one worth the space.


SSD is no good with todays technology, we need to refine our microchip manufacturing first. Addressing for 2.5 TBits/sec is well beyond consumer electronics we have today.


But the point of this technology is to allow the data to be split for different destinations, such as trans-atlantic ISP to ISP etc.

Either way, there are new memory devices on the horizon (basically non-volatile ram) which could be written to extremely quickly. It'll also allow for proper, uncompressed 4k HD streaming over the net. Finally!!!



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by EnigmaAgent
 


Cr@p, I can only imagine what my monthly comcast cable modem bill would be to access that network with my current cap .




posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by interupt42
 


Techinically, it would be cheaper. Sorry..SHOULD BE.

If your telecom gave you a "data allowance" when they have access to SO MUCH BANDWITH, they are cheating, lying scum and you should not take their business.

It's insane to have data caps on anything beyond DSL. Once you hit fiber, the sky is the limit.

~tenth




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