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Ancient matrix of 33.3 km in Finland.

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posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 06:31 AM
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Greetings Community!

As almost every first poster has stated before me, so will I; as a ’long’ term reader I finally decided to contribute and share something that hasn’t been discussed here. Not that I know of anyway. First of all, I come from Finland and apologize for my grammatical mistakes as of my native language isn’t English.

This post is somewhat a book review.

For a year ago I stumbled into a very intriguing book focusing on ancient ley lines in Finland. The concept of ley lines isn’t new in anyways as you all are aware of, but the phenomenon itself is new in Finland, especially in the scale it now has been discovered. The author Jukka Nieminen himself has contributed his life to bring forth facts and incidents not covered by mainstream science or media. He has written a few marvelous books but this one tops them all. This one tells us about an old and lost Finnish Kingdom (Muinaissuomalaisten kadonnut kuningaskunta).

Before reading this book I looked up, highly respecting all the ancient cultures and their hand-built wonders. I never thought I could mention our country in the same context. Now I’m more than proud to present Finland as a part, in my mind anyways, of this ancient know-how of mathematics, measurements and geometrical planning.

The book presents an astonishing geometrical network of churches, chapels and mansions, built with a distance of 33.3 km of one another. There are many straight ley lines that travel hundreds of kilometers centering in these mentioned buildings. The thing itself wouldn’t be that interesting, but the knowledge or the fact that all these churches have been built on ancient cemeteries or sanctuaries is mind-blowing. Behind this network is a tribe that formed its’ empire before the wave of Roman Christianity settled to Finland. The book estimates that this old Finnish Kingdom begun around 500 A.D. and had its’ foothold until they were decimated by this uprising religion. By the way, the nature of the religion is well shown in this network as they forced their will and build their churches on ancient sanctuaries, not knowing they were continuing the tradition of the lost Kingdom. At some point the church got the hang of it because we still can see the same pattern in newer churches around our country. So the knowledge still exists, or maybe not the knowledge, but the tradition to build using this ‘sacred’ geometry does.

Not all the churches relate to each other with the mentioned distance, but there are a lot of them that fall into this measurement. And even more of them that fall close to the distance, speaking of a marginal of 100 – 200 meters.

How and why this was executed is still a mystery. Why that particular number or that distance? The author himself has a very good point to the distance used. The territory of the old Kingdom with Lauhanvuori (mountain) as the center can be represented with a circle. The circle has a diameter of 333 km. There is an old measurement of how far you could travel in one day, 11.1 km, so this diameter consists of a month’s (30 days) travel time. Maybe the fraction used in the church measurements is based on this same logic.

Nevertheless, ancient cultures never seem to stop amazing you.

The book deepens further and speculates that the old Finnish Kingdom had more influence that has ever been discussed. That old bloodlines of Finnish Kings exists in the traditional Kingdoms beside us (Sweden, Norway, England…) There are many references in old Sagas of this ancient Kingdom, this tribe, this beginning of Royal bloodlines, but it has never been speculated like this. Considering the latter part as a speculation or a fact, it still gave me a new perspective and a new direction to study further in. Finland is commonly known for being under foreign influence during our time in history. We fought and got our independence in 1917. Maybe there has been a time of prosperity that we aren’t aware of!

The book was a very nice read!

Due to a lack of scanning devices I took some photos of the book showing the network and the ley lines. They might be a bit hazy but you'll get the point. The one made by scribblemaps is my own handwork.







posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 07:06 AM
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This is very interesting, some time ago i was using google maps to look at ancient sites in the south of england, it is amazing that they are seperated by 3.33 degrees.
I also found a series of "Ironage earthworks" in the shape of a pentagram seperated by 3.33 degrees.
The one sight in the UK i KNOW was built with a star alignment and hidden esoteric purpose, is 66.6 miles exactly to glastonbury tor.
I believe the whole metric system is designed to help us forget even more that the mile is the measurement used by the ancients when measuring distance.
The "Megalithic Mile" has some very important and interesting archaeology using this measurement from a well spring at wookey hole in the uk.
There must have been two founder ancient races using slightly different measuring systems, in europe.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 08:55 AM
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It is indeed very interesting because these numbers keep on turning up everywhere. We have found many landmarks with fraction distances like 3.33, 6.66 and 9.99 km. So someone had a good thing going on...

When I even think of measuring precise distances of many kilometres across forests and lakes without any contemporary devices, I get dizzy.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:55 AM
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Originally posted by OnWhiteMars
It is indeed very interesting because these numbers keep on turning up everywhere. We have found many landmarks with fraction distances like 3.33, 6.66 and 9.99 km. So someone had a good thing going on...

When I even think of measuring precise distances of many kilometres across forests and lakes without any contemporary devices, I get dizzy.


I'd suggest looking at Roman, Greek, Mesopotamian, Arab and Chinese survey techniques



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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I think this is where Santa's work shop is, and Santa. Like it's not the exact north pole as that's an ocean. It would have to be land so maybe finland.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 07:58 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by OnWhiteMars
It is indeed very interesting because these numbers keep on turning up everywhere. We have found many landmarks with fraction distances like 3.33, 6.66 and 9.99 km. So someone had a good thing going on...

When I even think of measuring precise distances of many kilometres across forests and lakes without any contemporary devices, I get dizzy.


I'd suggest looking at Roman, Greek, Mesopotamian, Arab and Chinese survey techniques


What was the preferred unit of measurement in Finland in the period discussed? Because if that unit wasn't the same as our modern kilometre then the whole "3.33"-type argument surely becomes invalid? While I have no reason to doubt there is a systematic or symbolic reason for the distances involved, trying to link them up to a golden third-type system sounds like it only works with modern measurements.



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 12:36 PM
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Originally posted by EvillerBob
What was the preferred unit of measurement in Finland in the period discussed? Because if that unit wasn't the same as our modern kilometre then the whole "3.33"-type argument surely becomes invalid? While I have no reason to doubt there is a systematic or symbolic reason for the distances involved, trying to link them up to a golden third-type system sounds like it only works with modern measurements.


I think there is no confirmation of the measurement used at that time. But it probably has been the same as now. Anyways, the point in this isn't the distance in kilometres, it is the wide 'grid-system' that has been developed throughout Finland (excluding the north). I know there are a lot of these things around the world, but an appearance of such finesse here is awesome.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 04:00 AM
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Wanted to gather some new attention to this thread. I would really appreciate if there are users among us that have interests in ley lines. If you could link me to similar interesting finds, that would be awesome. In particular, if there are Scandinavian similarities, I am very interested in checking them out!

Thanks!





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