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Ancient and unprecedented artwork showing a woman in childbirth is found by blind archaeologist

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posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 08:26 PM
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So, Your Blind, Your attempting something not previously attempted by yourself, and you find, this, (see Photo) of all things.




The ceramic image is thought to be 2,600 years old and was found in Tuscany.

'It must be the earliest representation of childbirth in western art,' Open University expert says


Archaeologists have discovered two pieces of astonishing art dating back around 2,600 years depicting a woman giving birth - the oldest such image ever found in the western world.

The artefacts were at the heart of an ancient Etruscan settlement in Italy’s Mugello Valley, near Florence.

The incredible images were on a small fragment from a ceramic vessel dating back to around 600 BC, and show the head and shoulders of a baby emerging from a mother, believed to be a goddess.


It goes on to note......


There are no known Greek or Roman representations of the moment of birth shown as clearly as this example until more than 500 years later.

The image also gives clues about the role of women in that society.

Scholars are certain that for some part of its history it was a sacred spot and the abundance of weaving tools and a stunning deposit of gold jewellery suggests that a women god is what the people there may have worshipped.


What luck for this Blind Student. Two weeks in and a Major find of this nature. He should be out looking, (pardon the Pun), all the time.
Who know's what he maybe able to find next!!

Ciao

Shane

link Ancient Childbirth Depiction







edit on 6/24/2012 by kosmicjack because: fixed title




posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 08:36 PM
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reply to post by Shane
 


I helped deliver my son and if that poor woman did it on her own, squatting, with only a branch to hold for comfort, well........ I take my hat off to her!

Very interesting! Thanks!
edit on 23/6/2012 by Grifter81 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 08:40 PM
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What are the odds it would represent a breech baby also...?

Unless I'm seeing it wrong?
edit on 23-6-2012 by HomeBrew because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 08:43 PM
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Really...when you think about it, it's shocking that we haven't seen this depicted more often. It's THE biggest event in the average human's life, particularly women.



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 09:03 PM
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Ancient Depiction of Childbirth.......

Another article with a better Photo of this find, along with further details.



And another

Ancient depictions of childbirth intrigue archaeologists


Ar­chae­o­lo­gists con­sid­er Pog­gio Col­la a rare and spe­cial site, partly be­cause it spans most of Etrus­can his­to­ry: it seems to have been oc­cu­pied from around 700 to 187 B.C., when Ro­mans over­ran it. It al­so fas­ci­nates ar­chae­o­lo­gists be­cause time has left it rel­a­tively un­scathed: it was­n’t bur­ied un­der lay­ers of lat­er con­struc­tion—a fate met by many oth­er set­tle­ments of Etr­uscans, who pick­ed beau­ti­ful, easily de­fended hill­tops as homes. Third, Pog­gio Col­la rep­re­sents a whole set­tle­ment, in­clud­ing tombs, a tem­ple, a pot­tery fac­to­ry and an ar­ti­san com­mun­ity. Ex­cava­t­ions of work­shops and liv­ing quar­ters are yield­ing new de­tails about Etrus­can life.

The site cen­ters on an acrop­o­lis, a roughly rec­tan­gu­lar plat­eau of one and a half ac­res at a hill sum­mit. Ex­cava­t­ions have found what schol­ars call strong ev­i­dence that the acrop­o­lis housed a sanc­tu­ar­y; they have iden­ti­fied a tem­ple build­ing and an al­tar at the cen­ter of a large court­yard. Many of­fer­ings have been found bur­ied around the al­tar, gifts ap­par­ently left as part of a sa­cred rit­u­al to some de­ity. These so-called vo­tive dona­t­ions range from a mas­sive de­pos­it of nearly 500 var­ied bronze ob­jects, to a spec­tac­u­lar gift of wom­en’s gold jew­el­ry and semi-precious stones.

Anoth­er such de­pos­it con­tains a group of what are thought to be rit­u­al ob­jects laid in a room at a cor­ner of the sanc­tu­ary court­yard, pos­sibly by a priest. Ex­cavators found a large cir­cu­lar pit, at the cen­ter of which was a sand­stone cyl­in­der, pos­sibly the top of a vo­tive col­umn. Near the cyl­in­der were two sand­stone stat­ue bas­es, the larg­er of which in­cludes the in­scribed name of some­one schol­ars say was probably an aris­to­crat­ do­nor, “Nakai(-)ke Velus.” Bur­ied with these ob­jects, ar­chae­o­lo­gists add, were a strand of gold wire; a bronze im­ple­ment bro­ken ap­par­ently on pur­pose; two bronze bowls once used to pour rit­u­al liba­t­ions; and the bones of a pig­let, pre­sumably sac­ri­ficed as part of a pu­rifica­t­ion rit­u­al. Based on the find­ings, re­search­ers have re­con­struct­ed what they say were the rit­u­als and ac­tions of the pre­sid­ing priest or mag­is­trate.


And there was this in another Paper detailing a bit more of the Etruscans

ANCIENT IMAGES OF A MOTHER GIVING BIRTH FOUND


A fun loving and eclectic people who among other things taught the French how to make wine, the Romans how to build roads, and introduced the art of writing into Europe, the Etruscans began to flourish around 900 B.C., and dominated much of Italy for five centuries.

Known for their art, agriculture, fine metalworking and commerce, they begun to decline during the fifth century B.C., as the Romans grew in power. By 300-100 B.C., they eventually became absorbed into the Roman empire.

Since their puzzling, non-Indo-European language was virtually extinguished (they left no literature to document their society),the Etruscans have long been considered one of antiquity’s great enigmas.


I wasn't quite aware of these peoples and influences previous to this. Thanks to the Blind Lad for the initial find.


Ciao

Shane



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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Standing up while giving birth has always been a good idea...at least she doesn't have to stop washing the dishes while she's at it...


oooh...I know, nasty but there it is...warped sense of humor and all.


Great find OP.

SnF

Peace



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 09:12 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Hey, people pay good money at birthing centers to do just that because hospitals are so counterintuitive to actually giving birth. I'm quite sure our ancestors could teach us a thing or two about doing it more user friendly for mommy and baby.



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 09:16 PM
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Originally posted by kosmicjack
reply to post by jude11
 


Hey, people pay good money at birthing centers to do just that because hospitals are so counterintuitive to actually giving birth. I'm quite sure our ancestors could teach us a thing or two about doing it more user friendly for mommy and baby.


Agree 100% on this. We had children for 10's of 1,000's of years without hospitals. Many nomadic tribes recounting their history almost always mention the women giving birth on the move. Walk, stop, deliver, walk.

I can't imagine the strength of women in our past but I can admire it. Amazing.

Peace



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 09:19 PM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 


I have thought about this too, why is it not portrayed more in ancient art?



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


*smacks Jude in the face and then has a quite little giggle*

Actually, my midwife suggested that I have my baby in a squatting position. I did squats all through my pregnancy to help build up those muscles. Sadly due to complications I didn't get to try it out.

Many women would have babies out in the field and just keep on going I guess. Now we think we need to have drugs and medical intervention to help us along.

Just imagine if we were to hear of a baby born in a field and the Mom wrapped it up and put it in the basket and kept on going. It would leave us clutching our pearls and gasping.

Great find OP!



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 09:28 PM
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Am I the only one perplexed by a 'blind' archeologist? If he can't see, how can he discover anything?



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by Night Star
 


No, I don't think you are, and frankly I was laughing during most of the first Post on this topic thinking about it.

But since he has lost one sense, it appears the sense of touch has paid dividends. They noted it (the Fragment) was dirty, and it is quite possible, that a visual of the item, may not have produced the desired results, and the find may have been set aside due to this.

Ciao

Shane



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 12:02 AM
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reply to post by Night Star
[more

Brushing and excavating... one's fingers meet the discovery first! Well before the total picture is clear to the eyes im sure he knew he found something. Mad kudos to him!



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 12:52 AM
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Interesting. Thanks guys for clearing that up for me.



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 01:01 AM
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Originally posted by Doodle19815
reply to post by jude11
 


*smacks Jude in the face and then has a quite little giggle*

Actually, my midwife suggested that I have my baby in a squatting position. I did squats all through my pregnancy to help build up those muscles. Sadly due to complications I didn't get to try it out.

Many women would have babies out in the field and just keep on going I guess. Now we think we need to have drugs and medical intervention to help us along.

Just imagine if we were to hear of a baby born in a field and the Mom wrapped it up and put it in the basket and kept on going. It would leave us clutching our pearls and gasping.

Great find OP!


A smack AND a giggle? Best fun I've had all day...


I have a keen interest in prehistoric life, social structures, customs and our eventual evolution to what we are today. The baby on the trail being delivered is not only ancient but can go back only a few hundred years in Caucasian societies with the settling of the West for example.

Then again, we have tribes in outer reaches of the Globe where this is still the norm. How can it not be?

Peace



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 02:17 AM
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...and not a single fvck was given that day, Child birth like a boss.

edit on 6/24/2012 by PatrickxJonathan because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by Shane
 


Then again how terrible, he may have already made the most important discovery of his life and he is not even technically a professional.



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 02:50 AM
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reply to post by artnut
 





When i went to egypt about 10 years ago and visiting various temples and pyarmids

one of the various wall carvings pointed out to us by the tour guide was one looking

very like that one of a woman giving birth.



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 03:09 AM
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Thats not a baby! It's a squatting mans ball sack!



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 03:21 AM
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Imagine the dude chipping away at the rock to get a picture of this event, the woman either took long with childbirth or the guy was fast and chipping away at the rock.




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