30 Trillion gallons of toxic waste injected into underground America!

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posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 04:59 PM
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Mods, I searched and didn't find this. Please delete if already posted

I know there have been many threads about fracking and the dangers that it can contaminate ground water. But how many know that today one common way to dispose of toxic wastes is to inject them underground. There are 680,000 toxic waste injection sites here in the USA. They have pumped more than 30 TRILLION gallons into the ground over the last several decades. I saw this article online and I had to post it here.

www.scientificamerican.com...




Over the past several decades, U.S. industries have injected more than 30 trillion gallons of toxic liquid deep into the earth, using broad expanses of the nation's geology as an invisible dumping ground.

No company would be allowed to pour such dangerous chemicals into the rivers or onto the soil. But until recently, scientists and environmental officials have assumed that deep layers of rock beneath the earth would safely entomb the waste for millennia.

There are growing signs they were mistaken





posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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I wonder how many fuel rods are in there



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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Then they wonder why sinkholes appear.




posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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Well we can now guess what all the banging has been about downstairs, Mama earth has one huge case of indigestion.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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Consider that the companies that created the waste - regardless of demand, did NOT have a place to dispose of much of it when the created it. In the same we we have created Nuke waste and have no useful way to dispose of that except as weapons and to create more nuke waste. Is it not obscene that someone, or some entity, can create a health, or even global human hazard, without first showing how then can dispose of it?

If I want to build a house I have pay the city to prove I can dispose of my toilet waste, but some giant conglomerate can simply produce the waste, then figure out how to get rid of later by assigning the effort to another company - in this case it seems simply pouring underground is cost effective (out of sight out of mind).



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:21 PM
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It's not Mother earth I am scared of, it's the 35 foot long man eating insects that will be created from the toxic goo.

Or the new 35 ft long edible meat product at taco bell.

Either or, why, these are people in charge of some serious stuff, yet are dumber than a box of hammers.

Even kids wouldn't think burying toxic waste underground is good.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:23 PM
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Yes and Gov Perdue in NC just announced that they are going to pass legislature to okay Fracking here in our state......
Yep, Im banging my head on a wall....



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by Manhater
Then they wonder why sinkholes appear.



A sinkhole happens when limestone is dissolved away by water and it would not be any factor regarding this waste disposal.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:37 PM
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reply to post by Starwise
 


The word fracking is evolving to encompass all types of wells where something is being injected intot he ground. I don't think it was the traditional use of the word but mant journalists have used it so much that fracking has become a general term for this type of drilling and pumping.

Yes, it is not good and I don't believe it is a sustainable method of disposal or gas production.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by crankyoldman
 


I worked for 18 months in a nuke plant like the ones that melted down in japan. I never gave it a thought about going to the top floor on the elevator to the fuel storage pool and reactor head before Fukushima. I see the epic failure of the design now. Once I was watch on video as some workers were changing out the control rod drives but some of them were so radioactive that they had to slam them back up intot he shielding because the dosimeter was jumping to 600 mr per hour and above. I learned a lot at that job which I will never forget.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by fnpmitchreturns


Records from disparate corners of the United States show that wells drilled to bury this waste deep beneath the ground have repeatedly leaked, sending dangerous chemicals and waste gurgling to the surface or, on occasion, seeping into shallow aquifers that store a significant portion of the nation's drinking water.


I was worried about the contamination of the water table.....

No wonder why cancer is so high.

The air we breath, the foods we eat [monsanto/GMO] , soap/shampoo's have got chemicals in them, and now we find out about this.

Great, just great. No wonder why Mother Earth is so upset....



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:18 PM
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reply to post by fnpmitchreturns
 


Great find and many many thanks. I am off to have a good read of this.

I already knew about the Forida wells but I hope now to find out other things I have not come across yet by reading that.

We are about to be fracked in Ireland and I intend doing everything I can to ensure that IF we have to suffer it at least it will be safe and properly controlled.


+3 more 
posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:27 PM
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At least we'll be safe from an alien invasion, who the hell would invade a planet as toxic as this one.

I bet somewhere out there on the galactic highways that lead to earth there are huge signs that read

Warning, lunatic asylum ahead, take next exit and run



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:37 PM
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Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns
reply to post by crankyoldman
 


I worked for 18 months in a nuke plant like the ones that melted down in japan. I never gave it a thought about going to the top floor on the elevator to the fuel storage pool and reactor head before Fukushima. I see the epic failure of the design now. Once I was watch on video as some workers were changing out the control rod drives but some of them were so radioactive that they had to slam them back up intot he shielding because the dosimeter was jumping to 600 mr per hour and above. I learned a lot at that job which I will never forget.




This is interesting to me. Many people assume, I think incorrectly, that all people associated with such situations know full well the dangers or even the absurdity of such processes. You suggest that your time there was not filled with "good lord this place is hell on earth and a mouse crap might send it over the edge" but rather "this is all fine, just doin my job."

That theme trickles down, as I'm shocked beyond definition that these plants were placed in: Earthquake zones, Tsunami zones and Major Population Centers, and in some cases all three, and no one really griped about it during construction. In what reality does this seem like a good idea, given we can't deal with the waste? Yet what you suggest is that only the very, very top person will have any real observation of the bigger issues. I suspect if you said, "where we going to put all this *&^% to your bosses you'd be ignored. Someone posted a great personal observation about how they worked on recovery at the pentagon on 9-12 and it had never occurred to them at the time that the official story didn't connect with the reality - it took 12 years to see it.

I'm curious. What did they tell you was a save level of accumulation of radiation for each person who worked there? Were you measured, say via hair? Was a safe level for embryo's ever spoken of?

lastly, the real question. It is said that these steam generators were a rouse to get the public to pay for weapons grade material. At the plant you worked at, was this the case, or could you have even detected this at all?



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:47 PM
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Yes, and it takes 100 feet of soil that the water would naturally be cleansed by if it were to travel in any direction after it is injected. The earth has ways of filtering the deadliest of contaminated water.

Considering that fracking wells are at 5,000 feet, I doubt very much that we have any concerns about toxicity.

However, I will agree that the volume of fluids injected is large...and could cause unsettlement at certain depths.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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Originally posted by crankyoldman

Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns
reply to post by crankyoldman
 


I worked for 18 months in a nuke plant like the ones that melted down in japan. I never gave it a thought about going to the top floor on the elevator to the fuel storage pool and reactor head before Fukushima. I see the epic failure of the design now. Once I was watch on video as some workers were changing out the control rod drives but some of them were so radioactive that they had to slam them back up intot he shielding because the dosimeter was jumping to 600 mr per hour and above. I learned a lot at that job which I will never forget.




This is interesting to me. Many people assume, I think incorrectly, that all people associated with such situations know full well the dangers or even the absurdity of such processes. You suggest that your time there was not filled with "good lord this place is hell on earth and a mouse crap might send it over the edge" but rather "this is all fine, just doin my job."

That theme trickles down, as I'm shocked beyond definition that these plants were placed in: Earthquake zones, Tsunami zones and Major Population Centers, and in some cases all three, and no one really griped about it during construction.


Well yeah, there were people griping about it.


Anti-nuclear protests

May 2, 1977: 1,414 protesters were arrested at the Seabrook nuclear power plant in New Hampshire.
June 1978: some 12,000 people attended a protest at Seabrook.
August 1978: almost 500 people were arrested for protesting at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in California.
May 1979: an estimated 70,000 people, including the governor of California, attended a march and rally against nuclear power in Washington, D.C.
June 2, 1979: about 500 people were arrested for protesting construction of the Black Fox Nuclear Power Plant in Oklahoma.
June 3, 1979: some 15,000 people attended a rally at the Shoreham nuclear power plant on Long Island, N.Y. and about 600 were arrested.
June 30, 1979: about 38,000 people attended a protest rally at Diablo Canyon.
September 23, 1979: some 167 protesters were arrested at Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant.
June 22, 1980: about 15,000 people attended a protest near the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in California.
September 1981: more than 900 protesters were arrested at Diablo Canyon.[20]
May 1984: about 130 demonstrators showed up for start-up day at Diablo Canyon, and five were arrested.[21]
June 5, 1989: hundreds of demonstrators at Seabrook Station nuclear power plant protested against the plant's first low-power testing, and the police arrested 627 people for trespassing.[22]


www.greenkids.de...

They were treated very much the same as the occupy movement is treated today, they were called all the same names by the media and ignored by "polite society". So they lost the battle.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by phantomjack
 



Considering that fracking wells are at 5,000 feet, I doubt very much that we have any concerns about toxicity.


:shk: What can one say to a statement like that? Did you read the article?

Perhaps you should take a look at this one How Gas Wells Leak

No in fact don't take a look at it READ it because you obviously did not read the article linked by the OP.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 08:17 PM
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Originally posted by frazzle

Originally posted by crankyoldman

Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns
reply to post by crankyoldman
 


I worked for 18 months in a nuke plant like the ones that melted down in japan. I never gave it a thought about going to the top floor on the elevator to the fuel storage pool and reactor head before Fukushima. I see the epic failure of the design now. Once I was watch on video as some workers were changing out the control rod drives but some of them were so radioactive that they had to slam them back up intot he shielding because the dosimeter was jumping to 600 mr per hour and above. I learned a lot at that job which I will never forget.




This is interesting to me. Many people assume, I think incorrectly, that all people associated with such situations know full well the dangers or even the absurdity of such processes. You suggest that your time there was not filled with "good lord this place is hell on earth and a mouse crap might send it over the edge" but rather "this is all fine, just doin my job."

That theme trickles down, as I'm shocked beyond definition that these plants were placed in: Earthquake zones, Tsunami zones and Major Population Centers, and in some cases all three, and no one really griped about it during construction.


Well yeah, there were people griping about it.


Anti-nuclear protests

May 2, 1977: 1,414 protesters were arrested at the Seabrook nuclear power plant in New Hampshire.
June 1978: some 12,000 people attended a protest at Seabrook.
August 1978: almost 500 people were arrested for protesting at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in California.
May 1979: an estimated 70,000 people, including the governor of California, attended a march and rally against nuclear power in Washington, D.C.
June 2, 1979: about 500 people were arrested for protesting construction of the Black Fox Nuclear Power Plant in Oklahoma.
June 3, 1979: some 15,000 people attended a rally at the Shoreham nuclear power plant on Long Island, N.Y. and about 600 were arrested.
June 30, 1979: about 38,000 people attended a protest rally at Diablo Canyon.
September 23, 1979: some 167 protesters were arrested at Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant.
June 22, 1980: about 15,000 people attended a protest near the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in California.
September 1981: more than 900 protesters were arrested at Diablo Canyon.[20]
May 1984: about 130 demonstrators showed up for start-up day at Diablo Canyon, and five were arrested.[21]
June 5, 1989: hundreds of demonstrators at Seabrook Station nuclear power plant protested against the plant's first low-power testing, and the police arrested 627 people for trespassing.[22]


www.greenkids.de...

They were treated very much the same as the occupy movement is treated today, they were called all the same names by the media and ignored by "polite society". So they lost the battle.




The no nukes people don't really count here, there is always someone protesting against everything - there are people that protest against clean water and I'm not talking about folks on the outside. Quite often the protests are staged by PR companies to divert attention from the facts etc.

The issue is folks who KNEW about the flaws in the designs and supported placing nuke plants, elaborate steam generators, in the WORST possible places. People are easily ignored, my point here is not "do people care" but how is it that people who do the construction, the building of, and the operating of these plants seem to be blind to the fact that they support a planetary time bomb? How is it that a person pouring fraking fluid in the ground is not freaked out enough to not do it? How is that we have people standing line for jobs that produce waste we can't get rid of and said waste will, most likely, injure them personally or their family and humanity as a whole?

What if the went to build a nuke plant and no one showed up to build it? There is something going on with those involved that prevents that from happening.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 09:55 PM
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reply to post by crankyoldman
 



The no nukes people don't really count here, there is always someone protesting against everything - there are people that protest against clean water and I'm not talking about folks on the outside. Quite often the protests are staged by PR companies to divert attention from the facts etc.


Well there you go, the protesters were just wasting their time hanging around getting their heads caved in for standing against what we now know was a very bad idea and for each caved in head, there were ten or twenty others willing to build the industries that we're paying such a high cost for now in terms of polluted water, air and soil.


The issue is folks who KNEW about the flaws in the designs and supported placing nuke plants, elaborate steam generators, in the WORST possible places. People are easily ignored, my point here is not "do people care" but how is it that people who do the construction, the building of, and the operating of these plants seem to be blind to the fact that they support a planetary time bomb? How is it that a person pouring fraking fluid in the ground is not freaked out enough to not do it? How is that we have people standing line for jobs that produce waste we can't get rid of and said waste will, most likely, injure them personally or their family and humanity as a whole?


What, you expect the planners or the media to tell us they were being built in the worst possible places? THEY DON'T CARE, THEY ARE PSYCOPATHS AND SOCIOPATHS. And they know people are easily fooled, particularly if there's a paycheck at the end of the week. Likewise, they know the few who can't be fooled will be ignored.

Workers will ALWAYS show up. They build bombs for the specific purpose of killing people, don't they? Its a living for some and death for others.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 10:09 PM
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Originally posted by frazzle
reply to post by crankyoldman
 



The no nukes people don't really count here, there is always someone protesting against everything - there are people that protest against clean water and I'm not talking about folks on the outside. Quite often the protests are staged by PR companies to divert attention from the facts etc.


Well there you go, the protesters were just wasting their time hanging around getting their heads caved in for standing against what we now know was a very bad idea and for each caved in head, there were ten or twenty others willing to build the industries that we're paying such a high cost for now in terms of polluted water, air and soil.


The issue is folks who KNEW about the flaws in the designs and supported placing nuke plants, elaborate steam generators, in the WORST possible places. People are easily ignored, my point here is not "do people care" but how is it that people who do the construction, the building of, and the operating of these plants seem to be blind to the fact that they support a planetary time bomb? How is it that a person pouring fraking fluid in the ground is not freaked out enough to not do it? How is that we have people standing line for jobs that produce waste we can't get rid of and said waste will, most likely, injure them personally or their family and humanity as a whole?


What, you expect the planners or the media to tell us they were being built in the worst possible places? THEY DON'T CARE, THEY ARE PSYCOPATHS AND SOCIOPATHS. And they know people are easily fooled, particularly if there's a paycheck at the end of the week. Likewise, they know the few who can't be fooled will be ignored.

Workers will ALWAYS show up. They build bombs for the specific purpose of killing people, don't they? Its a living for some and death for others.



I'm well aware of what his happening. But since I don't dump waste or work in an industry that actively creates things that destroy the quality of human life, I am curious about those who do and why they continue. In some cases they seem to be under a haze. I read where one of the men that worked on the design of the Fukashima style plant quit over the fact that the design was so bad. Tesla quit on the bomb but Einstein did not - why?





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