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Giant wombat mass grave found

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posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 02:36 AM
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reply to post by 12voltz
 


mayonnaise and wombat

For some odd reason it just doesn't sound appetizing...




posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 02:38 AM
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posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 02:39 AM
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Originally posted by boncho

Originally posted by CrimsonKapital
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


They are not wombats, they are an extinct genus called Diprotodons that were a about the size of a bear, they were herbivores and were also the largest known marsupial species to have ever existed!!!!


They are in the same family though.

I was going through pages and pages of wombat material to formulate a post and you killed my planned clarification.

Damn you.


Yes they are in the same family with wombats and koalas as well I'm sure.

Haha lol sorry.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 02:43 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


They are very tough and require a slow cook under the coals,this giant one would have made a prime meal for a family of hungry humans .Also known as the 'bulldozers of the bush' for obvious reasons



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 02:45 AM
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Originally posted by AndyMayhew
A few useful links


www.bbc.co.uk...

www.earthmagazine.org...

www.abc.net.au...

www.abc.net.au...

news.bbc.co.uk...


Thank you.

bookmarked and will be used when I write the thread on Mega-fauna extinctions



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 03:36 AM
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The disaster that befell the entire earth sometime close to 25,000 years ago. Mass burials from this time period have been found all around the earth. In some instances, frozen and mummified wooly mammoths were found with their last meals still in their mouths; fully preserved. Some of the mass burials numbered in the thousands. With varying species intermingled in violently scattered piles....

Anyone who knows about the precession of the equinoxes knows that it occurs every 26,000 years. According to the Mayan Long Count calendar, the current cycle of precession ends this year on that oh-so-famous date.

Roughly 25,000 years ago life on Earth experienced something monumental and disastrous. We still have legends of those times that are preserved in religion and culture. Legends of global floods, earthquakes, massive storms and amazing astronomical events pervade the entire planet.

I wonder what it will take for the world to wake up to the possibility that life on this planet can wink out of existence in the blink of an eye and that we must cherish all forms of life as we cherish ourselves and live every moment as if it were our last.

Because it just might be...peace,sugarcookie1



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 03:42 AM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


You know how as even that would be the most bad thing that could happen, I wouldn't want to miss it (when it does happen). I know, it's really really # (knowing people you love will also die), but still, like watching the best show of your lifetime, kinda. But yea maybe I'm dead wrong, and would think otherwise when really experiencing it.

I don't think 2012 is the end but at least I believe we see a big change.. we are on a crossroad of big problems, that I know.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 03:56 AM
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Nope not going outside anymore. Even though this thing is extinct....just nope going to stay in the (somewhat) safety of my house.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 04:36 AM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


I agree sugarcookie, but with every experience of this cycle the Earth learns, we of course don't, we haven't been around long enough yet, but the Earth has, and it has built adaptations and defenses to preserve the life that it needs to continue. That is what is important. We are nothing, and wholly insignificant in the grand scheme of things. Those organisms that have instinctive knowledge of these events, mainly I imagine, as a result of photogenic memory, will survive, mainly plant based life admittedly, but it's enough. And clearly, some hominids, mammals and other complex lifeforms have also weathered these cycles too, or we wouldn't be here at all.

Plus, it is important to bear in mind that the intensity and power of this particular cycle is diminishing. Though, there are other, longer cycles, to concern ourselves with
but not for some time yet.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 07:35 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


...and the reasons for it will probably be the same. Since Australasia was settled long before North America by man, the pressures of hunting, coupled with the dramatic changes in climate, along with other variables will have lead to their extinction. They simply couldn't adapt quickly enough.

Or so science postulates.

It's actually aliens on safari...


Cool find. Kenny rocks.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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reply to post by MystiqueAgent
 


Unless your door is a lot stouter than mine, I don't think staying inside is going to do you much good. That big ol' critter wants you? It's going to be tough to stop him with anything short of a howitzer, or lot's of stone speartips. Or maybe a howitzer shooting lots of stone spear tips...



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by seagull
 
A mature wombat can chew his way out of a corrigated iron pen to escape. They have incredible strength in those jaws and teeth yet I've never heard of humans being attacked.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by seagull
 


Haha my door is probably a lot worse as it has a fair bit of glass on it, the porch is also a bad spot as well. Still though at least I'll have a few seconds with the door protecting me for what good it may do



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
Some sources for you Slayer:



New Ages for the Last Australian Megafauna: Continent-Wide Extinction About 46,000 Years Ago


Pleistocene Extinction of Genyornis newtoni: Human Impact on Australian Megafauna



A review of the evidence for a human role in the extinction of Australianmegafauna and an alternative interpretation


Late-surviving megafauna in Tasmania, Australia, implicate human involvement in their extinction



Given the estimated arrival of humans at around 60,000 years ago, the demise of the megafauna 50,000 years ago, and no signs of climatic change during or around that period...seems a fairly obvious conclusion....



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by Biliverdin

Given the estimated arrival of humans at around 60,000 years ago, the demise of the megafauna 50,000 years ago, and no signs of climatic change during or around that period...seems a fairly obvious conclusion....


Yes and no, we know people can wipe out species which aren't adapted to the human method of hunting. However some other factors may have been in play

Climate change


"Between 50,000 and 3,000 years before present (BP) 65 percent of mammal species weighing over 44kg went extinct, together with a lower proportion of small mammals. Why these species became extinct in such large numbers has been hotly debated for over a century, "said lead author Dr David Nogues-Bravo

edit on 22/6/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Sorry, was referring specifically to Australasia...I'm not sure which of the articles it was in that you linked to, but it stated that there was no evidence of climate change in those regions.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by Biliverdin
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Sorry, was referring specifically to Australasia...I'm not sure which of the articles it was in that you linked to, but it stated that there was no evidence of climate change in those regions.



The top four are about that region with the last one being more general but they do state



The study shows that climate change had a global influence over extinctions throughout the late quaternary, but the level of extinction seems to be related to each continent's footprint of climate change. When comparing continents it can then be seen that in Africa, where the climate changed to a relatively lesser extent there were fewer extinctions.

However, in North America, more species suffered extinction, as reflected by a greater degree of climate change.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Any event, even one with a relatively short-term effect, that caused any significant die off, or die-back of flora would have seriously effected the majority of these animals. Carnivores of course can survive from the resultant carrion, herbivores though, especially ones of such great size, must have required massive amounts of vegetations, and only the most aggressive would have eventually survived.

Such a dramatic die off of vegetation, does though, to my mind, suggest something other than simple climate change, nuclear winter perhaps. I am not at all averse to the idea of a significant meteor impact having caused first fires, and then a major dust and debris plume. Climate change in and of itself, seems a little slow for what seems like a relatively rapid extinction.




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