Starving Greeks queue for food in their thousands

page: 2
52
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join

posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 02:07 AM
link   


Be aware! this is propaganda, but I have read similar documents like ten years ago!

Suddenly, most of these documents are cleaned out from the WEB, makes you go HMMM!

Our Slayer made some informative & terrfic threads about the "big game" please read those threads to understand the developments even for Balkan and Greece, and to get the bigger picture! about the control of natural resources:

Greece has natural resources by the millions of ton unexplored! - I mean really!

Oil , Gas, Gold, precious metals for hightech production etc!
edit on 22-6-2012 by Chevalerous because: SP




posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 02:16 AM
link   
You know... before the Euros started, I was wondering if there would be any Greek fans there. I was wondering how the Greek FA was gonna be able to fly their boys and house them n everything. Then the tourny started and I saw a bunch of Greek fans and I started thinking... so are things not that bad in Greece? How is it that people are starving in Greece yet there's fans at the Euros living it up? The Euros are not cheap by any means. Tickets and lodging are ridiculous.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 04:14 AM
link   
So Greece has turned into a third-world country in a matter of a few years. It really doesn't take that much to trigger a crisis of epic proportions.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 04:29 AM
link   
As usual the people have to suffer because of their governments irresponsible fiscal policies.Im sure we will send food relief but that wont cure the problem.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 05:12 AM
link   
reply to post by silent thunder
 


No-one should be starving in this world!! These issues are also happening in the US. Food here in the US- Half of a cart full at the Grocery Store usually is around 100.00. If you buy a full cart- you may pay as much as 200.00 or 250.00. Basically at my home- we eat one big meal a day. For the first time, my boyfriend and I planted a small garden.

We must get the Farms active again everywhere! I never knew until dating someone that hunts- how many rules there are on fishing and hunting game in general. None of us are truely Free! Things are set up so that we all have to depend on our Government services for help in some manner. If needed, we all need to learn how to live off the land, and even survive in a tent if needed.

I feel guilty for buying perfume yesterday, I should have put it towards extra food.

I hope the people in Greece will be ok!!



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:01 AM
link   

Originally posted by draco49
Is it really that difficult to stash away extra rice, beans, and canned goods each month? For about $10 a month, I buy an extra 5lbs of rice, 3lbs of dried beans, and a dozen cans of fruits and vegetables just in case something happens. At this point, I've got enough food to get me through an entire year if need be. If people would just employ some basic preparation strategies, standing in a huge public line for food hand-outs wouldn't be necessary.


Yes it can be "that difficult" at times, especially when you might have already used up spare resources to make ends meet as things have got progressively worse. I still remember reaching a point between qualifying and finding work when your $10 represented most of a week's shopping budget for two adults and two children. Life is oh-so-easy when you've got the spare money to invest and outgoings are substantially lower. Europe is not a cheap place to live.

These days I tend to keep the cupboards stocked but I doubt I could keep the family fed for more than a fortnight, longer if the fridge is still running and if we ate more carefully from the outset.

Good for you that you find yourself in your current financial position and I'm glad you're using the opportunity to prepare.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:04 AM
link   
The pictures don't tell me that the Greeks look Starving
heck they don't even look skinny as a cause when it happens when your body is out of food and energy.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:08 AM
link   

Originally posted by draco49

If something like this happened in the US, I have no doubt that at least 90% of the population would be just as unprepared, and you'd see Americans standing in line for hand-outs.


America is full of resourceful people, I don't doubt that many communities would be able to pull together in fairly short order.

What I would wonder, however, is the vast numbers already totally reliant on the government for support. Even without a food or financial crisis, what would happen if the benefits system was no longer funded? Wouldn't it lead to part of the population lining up for food parcels, just like Greece? In fact, would it be possible to say that there are already significant numbers living under "Greek" conditions (in many countries, including the US and UK) but it is masked by massive government intervention ie EBT, welfare etc?



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:14 AM
link   

Originally posted by Agent_USA_Supporter
The pictures don't tell me that the Greeks look Starving
heck they don't even look skinny as a cause when it happens when your body is out of food and energy.


I think "starving" is used in a relative sense - they might not be starving in the "african famine" sense, but starving by the standards of Europe. A "starving" European might only be getting 1000 calories a day. A starving African might not be getting any.

Europe is used to a warm, soft and fluffy life.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:19 AM
link   

Originally posted by EvillerBob
Yes it can be "that difficult" at times, especially when you might have already used up spare resources to make ends meet as things have got progressively worse. I still remember reaching a point between qualifying and finding work when your $10 represented most of a week's shopping budget for two adults and two children. Life is oh-so-easy when you've got the spare money to invest and outgoings are substantially lower. Europe is not a cheap place to live.

These days I tend to keep the cupboards stocked but I doubt I could keep the family fed for more than a fortnight, longer if the fridge is still running and if we ate more carefully from the outset.

Good for you that you find yourself in your current financial position and I'm glad you're using the opportunity to prepare.


I'm only shopping for one, and my monthly grocery bill is about $150, including the $10 extra I spend on preparatory supplies. Incidentally, my shoppers club card ends up giving me a discount of at least $10/month which nicely covers the cost of those extra supplies. I do understand that resources are not always available, especially for families with greater resource needs. I, myself, am not in an ideal financial situation but I feel that spending the extra dollars on prep supplies is as important as ensuring that my rent and utilities are paid. By focusing my spending on inexpensive core nutritional products (rice, beans, canned fruits and veggies) I've been able to incrementally build my food stores without the need to drastically cut other areas of my budget. I am actually in the process of putting together a guide to assist people in planning and budgeting for an emergency food, water, and supply cache, along with an ex-Navy buddy of mine. Hopefully, I will be able to publish it here within the next two weeks.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:34 AM
link   

Originally posted by SeekingAlpha
Not to get political, but if Ron Paul was to be elected and is able to push through his drastic spending cuts, we would be just like Greece right now.


If the Greek people had managed to catch this in time they would probably already be on the road to recovery by now, with an internal national currency. Protectionism is inevitable in this situation, and this should have been done to save the people from this a long time ago.

The question you should be asking yourself is how the US Gov intends to make the cuts needed to prevent the collapse of the $. Cuts are going to be needed either way, you cannot continue to increase the debt forever.

Would you rather have someone like Ron Paul in office who would end the wars and audit the Fed, or would you rather keep an administration that bails out capitalist failures, continues the wars, kills people by drone attacks, covers up corruption and fraud... your debt is growing at an alarming rate every single day, clearly whatever your government is doing isn't helping.

One day, and probably soon, the USA is going to be in a similar situation to Greece. I think it would be wise to see what other nations have done as potential lessons. Many have denied the coming currency implosion and their situation is worse. Those who chose to change their government and prevent the game from continuing seem to be doing far better.

It seems like a no-brainer in my opinion.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:42 AM
link   

Originally posted by draco49
I, myself, am not in an ideal financial situation but I feel that spending the extra dollars on prep supplies is as important as ensuring that my rent and utilities are paid. By focusing my spending on inexpensive core nutritional products (rice, beans, canned fruits and veggies) I've been able to incrementally build my food stores without the need to drastically cut other areas of my budget.


Oh I agree, and I'm being entirely genuine when I say "good for you".

The issue in many cases, however, is that most problems aren't "big bang" emergencies. Instead, they start off by things getting a little tight, the extra budget drops off, then the shopping budget is reduced and the food stores start to be used to supplement the shopping. That's exactly what the supplies are for, in fact - to make sure you have resources when resources are scarce.

Disasters don't always come with a handy nuclear blast or wave of invading paratroopers to signal "day 1". I'd go so far as to suggest that the first week of most disasters is spent arguing about whether the disaster is even happening
edit on 22-6-2012 by EvillerBob because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 07:21 AM
link   
Actually putting a little food aside each month can be very difficult.

I am disabled, and after paying my bills, I am left with £50 a month for food, petfood, and clothing. I make ends meet by growing my own fruit and vegetables in the back yard. Something my landlord expressed displeasure over at last inspection. "Gardens are for flowers, be lucky none of the neighbours have complained. If you want to grow food, an allotment would be more appropriate.", she said. Kinda ironic when I grow fruits and vegetables that are also decorative/flowering.

I buy dried/canned foods when I can afford it, but they usually get used up a few weeks on when money is unusually tight, due to an unexpected bill (usually for a repair to my bicycle).

So be thankful you can stockpile, but not everyone is so fortunate.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 07:23 AM
link   

Originally posted by draco49

Originally posted by BobAthome
reply to post by draco49
 


point being this is 2012,, its GREECE,,there is no need for it.
WHATSOEVER.


I agree. There is no need for the Greeks to starve. But apparently foresight and preparation are two concepts lost on the people of Greece. If something like this happened in the US, I have no doubt that at least 90% of the population would be just as unprepared, and you'd see Americans standing in line for hand-outs. As long as people keep their heads in the sand and continue going about business as usual, this sort of thing will continue to happen. If you're not prepared to live "off the grid" and without the modern conveniences we take for granted, you're only setting yourself up for disaster when the sh|t hits the fan.


Yeah so? All people who are going to Europe for a vacation should choose Greece. And what happens? They don't go being afraid of riots and so on. Sure long term strategies are important, but tell that to the people who can't afford their meds!



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 07:35 AM
link   
reply to post by QueenofWeird
 


That's a very good point, stockpiling food and saying if Greeks weren't idiots they'd have prepared, it's pretty difficult however to stockpile medications regardless of how well planned your strategy is. Most medications you cannot stock ahead on, period.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 08:03 AM
link   

Originally posted by sweetstuff
reply to post by QueenofWeird
 

That's a very good point, stockpiling food and saying if Greeks weren't idiots they'd have prepared, it's pretty difficult however to stockpile medications regardless of how well planned your strategy is. Most medications you cannot stock ahead on, period.


I cannot speak to the issue of medications in Greece sine I have no experience or knowledge in that arena. However, like many Americans, I too require daily medications and was able to put together a one year supply after discussing the matter with my doctor. It's not impossible. It just takes proper planning.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 08:22 AM
link   
The suffering of Greeks will be reduced and eliminated when they leave the EU.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 08:35 AM
link   
I would like to hear from someone who is actually lives in Greece right now, in the Athens area, and hear what they have to say, the "real story", so to speak.

I travelled to Greece a few years ago, Athens and the island of Santorini. With Santorini, I can't imagine there is any industry besides Tourism, there is nothing there, really, and you talk about being at the mercy of the economy. They get their food by boat, of course, but I noticed quite a few houses with small, sorry looking gardens that consisted mostly of tomatoes and peppers. They get so little rainfall, and water is such a premium, I think, and it is so dry looking, with not much vegetation to speak of. I am wondering how those people are faring.

I know I would not travel there right now, period. We almost got stuck the last time when the rails shut down due to protesting. I can't even imgagine how precarious things are now in regards to infrastructure.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 08:39 AM
link   

Originally posted by draco49...I too require daily medications and was able to put together a one year supply after discussing the matter with my doctor. It's not impossible. It just takes proper planning.


You mean "not impossible for you". I cannot imagine a doctor in the UK who would help with providing a supply like that. Perhaps it happens but it would certainly be the exception not the rule.

Different cultures, different approaches.



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 08:55 AM
link   

Originally posted by EvillerBob
You mean "not impossible for you". I cannot imagine a doctor in the UK who would help with providing a supply like that. Perhaps it happens but it would certainly be the exception not the rule.

Different cultures, different approaches.


Yes, as I said I am only speaking from an American's perspective. Over here, it is not unusual for a doctor to prescribe 6 months or more of maintenance medications at one time. The biggest hassle is in getting the scripts filled all at once. Insurance will only pay for 3mo with at a time, so I had to pay for the rest out of pocket. Fortunately, they are generics and cost only $12.00 per 3mo supply at Walmart or Walgreens. But again, I realize that every person is different and has different circumstances to deal with.

I would think that, in the UK, obtaining common medications from foreign pharmacies would be relatively inexpensive and easy. Of course that doesn't solve the problem for everyone, but it sounds like it could be a decent way to start.





new topics

top topics



 
52
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join