Giant Wave Impact in India on Wednesday, 20 June, 2012 at 03:14 (03:14 AM) UTC.

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posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 10:30 PM
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Just saw this at RSOE.. wonder what caused the giant waves? Oceanographic experts say it was caused by "low pressure".

hisz.rsoe.hu...



Giant waves, more than 12 feet high, hit the northern side of the famous shore temple at Mamallapuram, 60 km from Chennai, on Tuesday evening, leaving the heritage monument three feet deep in water. Sea water gushed inland for about 75 metres, leaving behind a pool of water. The temple town was virtually empty with more than 3,000 shops downing shutters to protest an Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) proposal to take over an ancient Perumal temple in the town. While there were no casualties, the waves triggered memories of the 2004 tsunami when the temple town was badly hit. "Tuesday's waves were a reminder of the tsunami. We were scared when we saw the tall waves. Fortunately, all shops were closed," said V Balan, a member of the Mamallapuram Traders' Association. The high waves, ASI sources said, started on Monday evening and continued all through Tuesday before resulting in a deluge in the evening. As a result the ASI is contemplating banning entry of visitors on Wednesday to the shore temple. However, oceanographic experts have been quick to reassure that the big wave is not the result of a tsunami. "This is just a local phenomenon and possibly a freak phenomenon caused by low pressure," said Dr M A Aatmanand, director of National Institute of Ocean Technology.




posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by berkeleygal
 


sounds like they all had
good karma on their side



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by berkeleygal
 


apparently this phenomenon is common during the monsoon? according to the times of india?

timesofindia.indiatimes.com...



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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Interesting. We were just discussing India in a Nelly Furtado "Big Hoops" thread the other day. Will keep a look out for more info.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 10:56 PM
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Giant waves, more than 12 feet high,


More than two meters high? It came inland for 75 meters? When it comes to waves, 2 meters is a decent surf. When it comes to 3 meters you might get yourself some waves capable of dumping you into the sand below (haha).

So it was just a large swell from a low pressure system that produced 2 meter waves that due to the low land was able to penetrate 75 meters inland.

Perhaps they should build a sand bank?
edit on 19-6-2012 by DaRAGE because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 11:30 PM
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Sounds like a storm surge .
Low pressure and high winds sort of "push" the water on shore.
That is what happens in the US when a hurricane comes ashore.



posted on Jun, 20 2012 @ 01:40 AM
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Originally posted by DaRAGE


Giant waves, more than 12 feet high,


More than two meters high? It came inland for 75 meters? When it comes to waves, 2 meters is a decent surf. When it comes to 3 meters you might get yourself some waves capable of dumping you into the sand below (haha).

So it was just a large swell from a low pressure system that produced 2 meter waves that due to the low land was able to penetrate 75 meters inland.

Perhaps they should build a sand bank?
edit on 19-6-2012 by DaRAGE because: (no reason given)


Hmm, 12 feet converts to 3.65 meters. Def gonna kiss some sand.




posted on Jun, 20 2012 @ 06:44 AM
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Originally posted by Cygnis

Hmm, 12 feet converts to 3.65 meters. Def gonna kiss some sand.



yeah full on, my bad in calculations.

Stilll.... Solution = Sand bank.





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