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First American Elections captured on Audio / Video

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posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 06:38 PM
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I thought this would be a pretty cool topic to look at and discuss. The idea is to create a thread that depicts the invent of audio/video into the world of American politics up to the first advertisement in 1952 payed for by the citizens for Eisenhower.

Perhaps by viewing what is here we can see that throughout history a lot of the issues surrounding the times are still present today to some extent, although in the 40's things changed dramatically IMO.

Note the audio and video clips are from sitting Presidents only.

The first recorded President I could locate was Grover Cleveland using campaign speeches. The video below contains a recording which is kind of hard to make out, it's from the 1892 campaign speech. Although I can't hear exactly what is said let's have a look at some of the issues in that era before the audio clip.

millercenter.org

When Grover Cleveland became President in 1885, he was the first Democrat to occupy the White House since James Buchanan was elected just prior to the Civil War. For most of his first term, Cleveland was more concerned with preventing Congress from granting privileges to special interests than with pursuing his own legislative agenda.



The second Presidential campaign speech was from William Mckinley in 1896. Also the first President to be captured on movie film, without audio.

Current issues:

source

Among the most important domestic issues that President William McKinley had to deal with during his presidency, bimetallism and tariff legislation loomed large. Through most of 1897, the McKinley administration pursued an international agreement to include silver, along with gold, as an acceptable backing for the major European currencies.



The third audio clip I found was of Theodore Roosevelt giving his (1912 maybe) campaign speech.

Current issues:

Source

When Theodore Roosevelt took the oath of office in September 1901, he presided over a country that had changed significantly in recent decades. The population of the United States had almost doubled from 1870 to 1900 as immigrants came to U.S. cities to work in the country's burgeoning factories. As the United States became increasingly urban and industrial, it acquired many of the attributes common to industrial nations—overcrowded cities, poor working conditions, great economic disparity, and the political dominance of big business. At the turn of the twentieth century, Americans had begun to look for ways to address some of these problems.


Moving on to William Howard Taft. I couldn't find a specific campaign recording but, none the less here is a speech from the President from 1909. (The audio is definitely improving.)

Current Issues:

Source

William Howard Taft entered the White House determined to implement and continue Roosevelt's program. His central ambition regarding reform was to create an orderly framework for administering a reform agenda. His conception of executive leadership was primarily focused on administration rather than legislative agenda-setting. He felt most comfortable in executing the law, regardless of his personal feelings for the particular piece of legislation.


Number 5 is Woodrow Wilson. There was some footage available but, I'll wait to post it until video merges with it. The audio cuts off, but the rest can be heard at the youtube link.

Current issues:

Source

Woodrow Wilson's presidency fulfilled the progressive reform agenda and laid the foundations of the modern activist presidency. Although he built upon the example of Theodore Roosevelt, and while his immediate successors would return to the caretaker model of the presidency, Wilson's administration fundamentally altered the nature and character of the presidency. He changed it from an equal or lesser partner with Congress to its superior—the dominant branch of government.



Number 7 is Warren G Harding. I did find some footage which contained audio and video together although it wasn't a campaign speech so I omitted it.

Current issues:

Source

As President, Warren G. Harding often seemed overwhelmed by the burdens of his administration. He frequently confided to his friends that the job was beyond him. But he worked at his duties intensely and tried to keep his campaign promise of naming the best men in the nation to his cabinet. Some of them were clearly men of talent and energy.



The 8th Presidential speech that was recorded was of Calvin Coolidge which so happens to be the first Presidential film that contained audio/video and seen across America.

For the sake of filling up the page and not having space to continue, I'm not going to post any of the current issues of the time. However you can see them here.


Number 10 is Herbert Hoover .

Current issues: here


Alright let's move on to number 11 Franklin D Roosevelt campaigning for votes in Topeka, Kansas.

Current issues: here



Number 12 is Harry S Truman. I couldn't find any campaign speeches from 1945 so here's one from 1948. I'm going to post links to current issues and also foreign affairs because IMO I believe the invention of the atom bomb has significantly changed history.

Current issues: here

Foreign affairs: here



I'm going to stop here and continue in another thread because in 1952 political advertising began to enter into American homes, and it's much different than what we viewed or heard in combination above, so enjoy.

~Daedal~















edit on 19-6-2012 by Daedal because: added video

edit on 19-6-2012 by Daedal because: Edit




posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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Good stuff. Love me some primary source footage from way back when.
Just a small point. The reason you can't find Truman campaign footage from before 1945 is because he wasn't even chosen as FDR's 1944 running mate until a few months before the election. Truman really didn't want the job but felt it his duty after being more or less guilted into it by FDR.
You won't find many men of his character in the Senate (where he was prior to being VP). It also shows some character on FDR's part since he knew he would not likely survive his fourth term and wanted someone who could handle the major task ahead (finishing up WW2 and the post war challenges). That man was not Henry Wallace(his VP for 2nd and 3rd terms) and FDR knew it. He sensed it in Truman and did everything he could to get Truman to accept the VP slot. I don't think Truman did much campaigning for his Vice Presidency on 1944.
One need not agree with every decision Truman made as Prez, but studying the man, one gets a sense of decency, responsibility, and honor. Something I don't pick up from Obamney or Rombama.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 07:18 PM
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reply to post by pierregustavetoutant
 


Yeah I was looking for footage but couldn't find any. Thanks for letting me know why I didn't.



 
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