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Water found on the sun

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posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 03:02 PM
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reply to post by maxella1
 


Get out!
(my very best Elaine impression)




posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 03:30 PM
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Originally posted by AFewGoodWomen
reply to post by maxella1
 


Get out!
(my very best Elaine impression)


I know, right!?!



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 04:46 PM
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Everyone seems to be talking about the processes which would split water vapour.

I suspect the answer will be found in a process which is able to combine H & O in spite of the temperature.

Considering that this process is happening within intense magnetic fields, where there will be a massive electron flow, I don't find it that hard to believe.

Don't forgot that the water molecules don't have to survive very long - maybe only microseconds or less. But if the process is widespread it will to an observer as a constant.
edit on 18-6-2012 by BagBing because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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Originally posted by Hawking
So parts of these sunspots are less than 100C or 212F?


Really?


Even if they could be it makes no difference. The article says water steam or vapor, not liquid water... so the boiling point makes no difference.

Pretty interesting though. Could the STARS actually be what continually creates water throughout the universe, and can they shed this water outwards during an ejection? This would mean that practically EVERY star system out there has at least some water.

My basic knowledge is that stars continue to create heavier and heavier elements by fusion. This means that helium and hydrogen will fuse to the heavier oxygen and so on. Once a star gets to the point of fusing its first iron atom, the chain reaction starts where the star ends up imploding on itself. If they go supernova then even heavier elements can be created during the explosion.

But the interesting thing here is that the stars already create their own oxygen. Are we seeing that oxygen come to the surface of the star, combine with the already prevalent hydrogen and form water? That would be so great! If stars pump out water, even in miniscule amounts, there could still be life similar to ours, chemically -- everywhere!


Good link, OP... thanks.


Khar
edit on 18-6-2012 by Kharron because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Thank you, so you are saying at 3200 K we have roughly 50% of them disassociating?

Than that explains why some is left and could be detectable by our sensor instruments.
I went and read up on it some but didn't see that specific fact.

Thanks again for your contribution.

edit on 18-6-2012 by muzzleflash because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 06:21 PM
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The amount of ignorance on this thread is mind boggling. Personally, I don't what is so fantastic about the idea of water vapor existing on the sun, seems reasonable to me, just from having the barest understanding of what stars are and how they work. I suggest that any people interested in this thread read the first five pages of a book called, "Blackholes and Warped Spacetime" by William Kaufmann. The first chapter "Evolution of stars explains how stars work and actually makes the idea of water vapor at least temporarily existing on the sun seem like a logical idea.

Since I can't find the book online to quote and I don't really want to type large excerpts from the first chapter by hand, I will simply paraphrase the general understanding of the process of how stars function. All stars are fusion reactors, meaning they take lighter elements and fuse them into heavier elements. All stars start out as being primarily hydrogen. In there initial phase they undergo hydrogen reaction and fuse the hydrogen for most of their power. The by product of the hydrogen fusion is helium. After the star fuses most of the hydrogen at it's core it enters a state of helium reaction. It begins to fuse the helium for it's power. The by product of helium fusion is carbon and oxygen....As you can see the sun itself just by the nature of how it functions, has hydrogen in it and eventually begin forming oxygen.

Now that you realize that both hydrogen and oxygen exist in the sun, the only question is how they fuse together to make water vapor even if the vapor only exist temporarily.....well the sun is a fusion reactor as I said in the beginning, which means by the nature of it's functioning it kind of fuses elements together.

So looking at all that I don't really see why the idea is really so amazing, improbable, or unbelievable.



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 08:58 PM
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I think we need to expand our thinking slightly. To encompass ideas which do not rely on our learned responses to make sense of our reality.

Yes, our common sense says that the sun is yellow and burns very hot - at least we can feel the heat here all this way from the sun so it is hot... right?

However, we do not know how the universe works and it may be that only the outside layer of the sun is hot or that the water and other stuff we see escaping from it is in fact coming through a 'portal' of some kind.

We have seen things which appear to be craft near to the sun - so how could that happen if it is as hot as we think it is?
Some people believe that there are other dimensional parts of the sun which we know nothing about and that would certainly account for some of the phenomena we are just seeing or discovering.

The poiunt I am making is that if you limit your thinking to what science tells you is "possible" then you limit your understanding of the universe. Because science does NOT know everything which is happening out there (or here too)

Yes, it is nice and safe to believe all that stuff, because we can tell ourselves that our universe is structured how we thing it should be... so challenge yourself a little and let go of scientific preconceptions. :-)



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 09:18 PM
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There was a guy several years ago who proposed that the formation of the Earth's oceans was due to huge snowballs falling from outer-space (snowballs the size of a house). I believe these 'snowballs' were later proven via satellite...so perhaps water from the sun is the source.



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 09:20 PM
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The lie in the article, is the sun's temperature. its not that hot. We perceive the heat due to atmospheric interaction like in the Electric Universe Theory, and also due to the programming in our brains and this matrix.

Its not what people think at all.

What it is is wonderful however.



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 09:50 PM
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Originally posted by NosmoKing
There was a guy several years ago who proposed that the formation of the Earth's oceans was due to huge snowballs falling from outer-space (snowballs the size of a house). I believe these 'snowballs' were later proven via satellite...so perhaps water from the sun is the source.

Do you mean comets? (although most comets are miles wide, not the size of a house)

The idea that comets brought water to earth is a relatively common one that has gained quite a bit of scientific acceptance as a "possibility", although there are other scientists who think that comets may have brought Earth some of its water, but not all.



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 10:03 PM
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Water vapour, hydroxyls or OH, from stars / sunspots has been known since the sixties.

www.nature.com...



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 11:29 PM
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In related news, fire found in the ocean.




posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 11:48 PM
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Originally posted by AwakeinNM
In related news, fire found in the ocean.



That's Awesome !



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 12:07 AM
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Originally posted by Legion2024
reply to post by mainidh
 


What are they trying to hide...? I think the fact is they just simply don't know.
I say lets send a probe right in to a sunspot and find out


I think you'll need about 3 million probes to actually get a good answer, so I would volunteer every career politician and international banker on the planet to pilot the probes. Since NASA never does give a straight answer they will probably need professional liars as astronauts.

Cheers - Dave




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