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Meteor 2012 AD14

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posted on Jun, 17 2012 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 

thank you for a more non bias answer, waether or not it is 2012 AD14 or not. Things in space, can react much like billard balls hiting each. I know chances are small etc etc and things get calculated to the best posible degree of error. But again, nothing is absolute.

If ad14 were to hit one of our many satelites could that cause a change?

I am just throwing thoughts out there. I to will not loose sleep over any asteroid, even if it was a confirmed strike... It is what it is.


Thanks for a good answer




posted on Jun, 17 2012 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by Iamonlyhuman
 


Don't a lot of people's credit lines expire 2/13?
Seems like everyone's does.



posted on Jun, 17 2012 @ 07:48 PM
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If whole countries cannot balance their own budgets, why the hell would anyone think a planet killer asteroid would be met with international effort to deflect and/or destroy it without any problem?

If we could do that as quickly as it would take - someone needs to explain to the people of Earth why we can't pay our bills.
edit on 17-6-2012 by Floydshayvious because: spellz



posted on Jun, 17 2012 @ 08:37 PM
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Originally posted by MoeFugga
reply to post by eriktheawful
 

thank you for a more non bias answer, waether or not it is 2012 AD14 or not. Things in space, can react much like billard balls hiting each. I know chances are small etc etc and things get calculated to the best posible degree of error. But again, nothing is absolute.

If ad14 were to hit one of our many satelites could that cause a change?

I am just throwing thoughts out there. I to will not loose sleep over any asteroid, even if it was a confirmed strike... It is what it is.


Thanks for a good answer

If it hit a satellite it would hardly even phase the asteroid's trajectory, and by that point it would be so close to earth that it would require a very high delta-V (change in velocity) in order to re-direct it to earth. Probably so high that if any instantaneous force that large were applied it would rip the asteroid apart.



posted on Jun, 17 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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Originally posted by MoeFugga
reply to post by eriktheawful
 

thank you for a more non bias answer, waether or not it is 2012 AD14 or not. Things in space, can react much like billard balls hiting each. I know chances are small etc etc and things get calculated to the best posible degree of error. But again, nothing is absolute.

If ad14 were to hit one of our many satelites could that cause a change?

I am just throwing thoughts out there. I to will not loose sleep over any asteroid, even if it was a confirmed strike... It is what it is.


Thanks for a good answer


You're welcome.

ngchunter answered your question, but I'll give my analogy again:

Based on the size of this asteroid (about 167 feet wide), traveling at speeds much faster than our satellites (which are limited to a few feet up to 10 feet or so wide), it would be like you walking towards a bus that is moving 65 Mph when it hits you.

The asteroid would most likely go: "What satellite?"

It would have to hit a satellite that is a LOT bigger and denser for it to affect any change in it's path.

Of course the people that own the satellite would not be very happy....heh.



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 08:11 AM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful

Originally posted by MoeFugga
reply to post by eriktheawful
 

thank you for a more non bias answer, waether or not it is 2012 AD14 or not. Things in space, can react much like billard balls hiting each. I know chances are small etc etc and things get calculated to the best posible degree of error. But again, nothing is absolute.

If ad14 were to hit one of our many satelites could that cause a change?

I am just throwing thoughts out there. I to will not loose sleep over any asteroid, even if it was a confirmed strike... It is what it is.


Thanks for a good answer


You're welcome.

ngchunter answered your question, but I'll give my analogy again:

Based on the size of this asteroid (about 167 feet wide), traveling at speeds much faster than our satellites (which are limited to a few feet up to 10 feet or so wide), it would be like you walking towards a bus that is moving 65 Mph when it hits you.

The asteroid would most likely go: "What satellite?"

It would have to hit a satellite that is a LOT bigger and denser for it to affect any change in it's path.

Of course the people that own the satellite would not be very happy....heh.


I do understand, I reckon the Asteroid would hardly notice, but I think I was thinking more about the slight change it may have, even just a small percent, the ability to alter it for future passes.
The Asteroind passes close to earth about every 6 months correct, perhaps if no obstructions interfere with it, eventually it will hit earth, perhaps not.

But lets say it hit a satelite, or the international space station (I am not sure of it's Orbital altitude) However I know that since the asteroid 2012 DA14's orbit is already predicted they can perform a Debris Avoidance Manoeuvre, yet there is still large amount of solid space junk up there, rocket stage shell's, Mir, Nuclear powered satelites etc etc...

So if one of these were be impactected, and slightly changed the trajectory even by a C**t-Hair, could this increase it's chances of an impact during future passes?


On another note, Someone mentioned an international co-op.... I don't reckon other countries can be trusted to work together, we can't do that here on earth so why is space any differant, especially if it's not an E.L.E.... maybe if there was an E.L.E. headed this way they can be trusted to work together... self interest and self preservation... past history and present history of Human interaction and working together doesn't fill be with the most confidence, No wonder Alien Life has not made them selves known, they watch us and go "Bugger that mate"... But that's another topic all together
edit on 18-6-2012 by MoeFugga because: added text
edit on 18-6-2012 by MoeFugga because: changed text



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by MoeFugga
 


The ISS orbits at about 250 miles above the Earth, so it's well below the path of this asteroid.

However if it did hit it, that would be a different argument given that the ISS is over 100 meters wide (twice as big as the rock), but then density and speed would come into play. I would hazard a guess that impact with it would significantly affect it's path, but also Earth's gravity (the strength of Earth's gravity is a lot stronger at 250 miles verses 23,000 miles).

Impact with a smaller satellite further out could induce a very small change possibly. Whether or not that would cause it to eventually collide with the Earth would remain to be seen. It could just as easily change it's orbit and take it further from Earth.

As for international cooperation: believe it or not, not everyone on the planet is at each other's throats. Most scientist work with other scientist around the world just fine. The biggest problem you have for the most part in today's world, is scientist that hold on to information because they want to get published first!



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 08:47 AM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful
reply to post by MoeFugga
 


The ISS orbits at about 250 miles above the Earth, so it's well below the path of this asteroid.

However if it did hit it, that would be a different argument given that the ISS is over 100 meters wide (twice as big as the rock), but then density and speed would come into play. I would hazard a guess that impact with it would significantly affect it's path, but also Earth's gravity (the strength of Earth's gravity is a lot stronger at 250 miles verses 23,000 miles).

Impact with a smaller satellite further out could induce a very small change possibly. Whether or not that would cause it to eventually collide with the Earth would remain to be seen. It could just as easily change it's orbit and take it further from Earth.


Fair Enough



As for international cooperation: believe it or not, not everyone on the planet is at each other's throats. Most scientist work with other scientist around the world just fine. The biggest problem you have for the most part in today's world, is scientist that hold on to information because they want to get published first!



yeah, it's not the scientist I'm worried about, it's the government bodies that have to powers to do or not to do... but hey, another topic


and still can't get my bloody Avatar to work
edit on 18-6-2012 by MoeFugga because: added text



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 08:59 AM
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Your Avatar:

go up and click on "TOOLS+" in the menu above.

Then look for a button that says "ATS Uploads" and click on that.

There will be another button That says "Select Image File" (but only if you have Adobe Flash installed)

Click on that and pick the picture you want to up load.

Once it has uploaded, click directly on the thumbnail of the pic listed.

It will show the picture with several links. Copy the URL it gives for "External full URL link:"

Go back to TOOLS+ and scroll down where it says Your Avatar.

Paste the URL into the box and click on the submit button.

That's what I had to do.
edit on 18-6-2012 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Damn, I have been trying to add a url from my flicker account grrrr.

Thanks Eric

edit on 18-6-2012 by MoeFugga because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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ANY given collision, even if large enough to induce the needed delta-V for putting it on a collision course, is most likely going to be in the wrong direction. As an example, if I gave you an orbit simulator with a vessel in an arbitrary orbit that will take it close to earth at some point a year or more in the future, told you exactly how much delta-V you needed to apply to put it on a collision course, and let you apply it in any direction of your choosing, you would spend months randomly guessing the direction to apply the delta-V and still not get it right unless you deliberately determined the direction you needed to apply it in. Space is unimaginably huge and the accuracy required to hit a target with a burn performed months in advance is unfathomable. Many of our early probes missed their targets wildly because we lacked the sophistication needed to make them accurate enough.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 03:48 AM
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Mind if I change the subject? sure I can, it's my thread :þ
since we are speaking of Orbits, I know that all the planets in our solar sysem orbit the sun and it is a stable cycle.
I know our Galaxy Orbits, all tho, I do not know what it orbits, a black hole maybe. My question tho is, Does our solar system have its own orbit?

Break down

Moon Orbits earth
earth orbits sun
solar system orbits ??? (or is it stationary with in our Galaxy?)
Galaxy orbits ????



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 03:51 AM
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one other question I forgot, is it true that every year the moon get a little further away from earth? Does this mean that in another million years or so it will eventually break free of our planets orbit? I suppose that would have some not so good effects on tides



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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Originally posted by MoeFugga
Mind if I change the subject? sure I can, it's my thread :þ
since we are speaking of Orbits, I know that all the planets in our solar sysem orbit the sun and it is a stable cycle.
I know our Galaxy Orbits, all tho, I do not know what it orbits, a black hole maybe. My question tho is, Does our solar system have its own orbit?

Break down

Moon Orbits earth
earth orbits sun
solar system orbits ??? (or is it stationary with in our Galaxy?)
Galaxy orbits ????


The solar system orbits the galaxy's barycenter. The galaxy in turn orbits the barycenter of the Local Group, a group of 54 galaxies in our local vicinity that are gravitationally bound. Our galaxy and the andromeda galaxy are the two most massive galaxies within the local group.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 09:07 AM
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Originally posted by MoeFugga
one other question I forgot, is it true that every year the moon get a little further away from earth? Does this mean that in another million years or so it will eventually break free of our planets orbit? I suppose that would have some not so good effects on tides

The moon's orbit slowly expands as it steals our rotational energy through tidal forces, but this process is very slow. It will not "break free" in a million years.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 11:14 PM
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Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by MoeFugga
one other question I forgot, is it true that every year the moon get a little further away from earth? Does this mean that in another million years or so it will eventually break free of our planets orbit? I suppose that would have some not so good effects on tides

The moon's orbit slowly expands as it steals our rotational energy through tidal forces, but this process is very slow. It will not "break free" in a million years.


Thanks mate that gave me a very good picture... Regarding the moon breaking free ( which is kinda funny since queens 'break free' song is playing on the Wallace) I didn't literally me a million years or so, just wondering if it eventually will get out far enough to be caught in the gravity of the sun, Venus or mars. Might sound like a stupid question just curious.... I reckon the sun has a greater chance of going super nova before that is likely



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by MoeFugga
 


Well there you go with a good idea. The Moon move away from the Earth a few centimeters a year and the Earth moves away from the Sun 15cm a year. Both changes are due to the same reason.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 11:38 PM
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Originally posted by MoeFugga

Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by MoeFugga
one other question I forgot, is it true that every year the moon get a little further away from earth? Does this mean that in another million years or so it will eventually break free of our planets orbit? I suppose that would have some not so good effects on tides

The moon's orbit slowly expands as it steals our rotational energy through tidal forces, but this process is very slow. It will not "break free" in a million years.


Thanks mate that gave me a very good picture... Regarding the moon breaking free ( which is kinda funny since queens 'break free' song is playing on the Wallace) I didn't literally me a million years or so, just wondering if it eventually will get out far enough to be caught in the gravity of the sun, Venus or mars. Might sound like a stupid question just curious.... I reckon the sun has a greater chance of going super nova before that is likely

Eventually the moon would steal enough of our rotational energy that we would be mutually tidally locked; an earth day would last one month, and at that point one month would last about 47 days (since the moon's semi-major axis would expand to about 550,000 km at that point). At that point the moon would be unable to steal additional rotational energy, the earth-moon system would reach equilibrium, and the moon would stop getting farther from earth. This process would take about 50 billion years... but the sun will consume earth in about one tenth that time.



posted on Jun, 20 2012 @ 03:31 AM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


well then, we have time to get to GJ 667Cc al we need to do is invent a warp drive or at least the ability to travel at light speed.

Question on that... if in 0 Gravity if there is no friction while moving through space, could a craft move ant incredible speeds?

I am just looking into differant types of hypothetical options such as propulsion, solar wind sails, Gravitoelectromagnetic toroidal launchers, Nuclear photonic rocket, Fission-fragment rocket, Bussard ramjet, Antimatter catalyzed nuclear pulse propulsion, Fusion rocket, Nuclear pulse propulsion - Project Daedalus' drive, and My Favorite - Antimatter catalyzed nuclear pulse propulsion

Reasearching for a sci-fi novel (if I ever get started) so thats why all the questions regarding meteor impacts and doomsday stuff



posted on Jun, 20 2012 @ 06:55 AM
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Originally posted by MoeFugga
reply to post by ngchunter
 


well then, we have time to get to GJ 667Cc al we need to do is invent a warp drive or at least the ability to travel at light speed.

Question on that... if in 0 Gravity if there is no friction while moving through space, could a craft move ant incredible speeds?

Not without the required energy to move it; objects in space still have mass regardless of gravity.


I am just looking into differant types of hypothetical options such as propulsion, solar wind sails, Gravitoelectromagnetic toroidal launchers, Nuclear photonic rocket, Fission-fragment rocket, Bussard ramjet, Antimatter catalyzed nuclear pulse propulsion, Fusion rocket, Nuclear pulse propulsion - Project Daedalus' drive, and My Favorite - Antimatter catalyzed nuclear pulse propulsion

Reasearching for a sci-fi novel (if I ever get started) so thats why all the questions regarding meteor impacts and doomsday stuff

Certainly many options exist, but none of them will allow you to break light speed. Whether that matters to the crew is debatable; relativistic travel would make a very long journey seem short at high fractions of light speed (in terms of measuring one's velocity simply by measuring how fast objects appear to be moving by you, it would seem like you're accelerating well past light speed as if relativity didn't exist, but if you examined a clock on those objects moving by you, you would see that time is vastly accelerated and if you measured your speed by that time then you're not traveling faster than light), it's just that by the time they return, everyone they ever knew would be long dead.





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