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Professional Locksmith

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posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 10:25 PM
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reply to post by clintdelicious
 


Some of the "tools" you will need are actually parts, some disposable to an extent.
For starters, pin kits: not all manufacturers are the same incriment .003, .005, etc.
I had a couple of LARGE pin kits, LAB brand and they were if I remember correctly 250ish price range and this was almost 20 years ago.
Not all tumblers are pins, some are wafers, so you get the idea that there are many different shapes and sizes.
Key cutting machines and stamps, some machines punch out a cut and can be dialed in for different set depths.
Wheel type machines have many different cutting angles, so there are many different machines and not much in the way of a one fits all, there are some that are fairly good though.
Now you have other things like shims and followers, cylinder punches, Etc. to remove cylinders, different locks are different sizes.
Another thing to keep in mind, NOTHING in locksmithing other than a hammer, drill, and screwdrivers are gonna be anything but a "specialty" tool, Auto and home. (yep they're gonna make you pay premium).

This is just off of the top of my head and I was never a locksmith, I just helped out alot.
Stateside, like an above poster said, do 24 hour callouts, there is where the good money is.
And as far as rates, if you are calling me out at 2 am, nothing is cheap.
Otherwise they gonna break a window.

Locksmithing is doable but like all other business, it is hard to compete with the bug conglomerate companies.
Roadside insurance companies can get folks into their cars and everyone cuts keys, so for me, I wouldn't do it.




posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 11:47 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 

Hi I have been a professional Locksmith for almost 10 years and have owned two Locksmith Businesses and am running a new Locksmith company now. If you are really interested in becoming a professional Locksmith who is competent and knowledgeable about the job then you must start out with lots of training, reading and studying techniques and tools/equipment, and terminology. The best way to start out as I did was sign up for a Locksmith class by mail like the Foley Belsaw Institute. Its a good beginners class that gives you training materials, tools, and when you graduate you get a free key cutting machine. It also really helps if you know a Locksmith personally that can guide you in the right direction. My father in-law was a Locksmith for 30 years and helped me along the way to my success. After I took the Foley Belsaw class I took another more advanced class and by then had enough knowledge and experience to get a full time job in a Locksmith shop cutting keys, stocking keys, impressioning keys, re-keying locks, cutting keys by code, and even learned to open some safes right there in the shop. The first things you need to learn are what different types of locks are out there and how they differ from each other, then you must learn how to pick most locks. It also matters what state you live in because there are different credentials you must hold depending on what state you are in. It also helps if your local area is not over saturated with other locksmiths as there will be alot of competition. Check your local library for locksmith text books and other locksmith reading material. There is also the National Locksmith Magazine which is a pretty good monthly magazine subscription for locksmiths. I wish you good luck in you endeavor of wanting to be a locksmith and If you have any questions please feel free to ask me. Your ATS Locksmith , lockman.



posted on Jun, 15 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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The problem I think I'm going to run into is that the New York State Dept of Education has to approve the curriculum of the school. I have been on the phone with the State and the schools and no one can really tell me if the NYS Education has an approved list of schools for locksmith. It's utterly amazing. The State has their hands in EVERYTHING here, and still, no one knows anything. It's so frustrating. I ordered training materials from Ashworth College and I would have to complete the training only to find out NYS won't accept it. The other option is to get recommendations from 2 locksmiths. I don't know any yet. lol



posted on Jun, 15 2012 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by lockman
 


Thank you for all the good info. I will definitely tap you as a resource (if u don't mind).




I wish you good luck in you endeavor of wanting to be a locksmith and If you have any questions please feel free to ask me. Your ATS Locksmith , lockman.

Thank you so much, lockman!



posted on Jun, 15 2012 @ 08:36 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


Yea New York State, California, and New Jersey all have the strictest requirements I believe. I have never lived in any of those states so I am unfamiliar with their mandates. Good luck with the courses and if I can be of any help, let me know.



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 06:07 PM
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Originally posted by lockman
reply to post by Cosmic911
 


Yea New York State, California, and New Jersey all have the strictest requirements I believe. I have never lived in any of those states so I am unfamiliar with their mandates. Good luck with the courses and if I can be of any help, let me know.


I think it's going to be difficult to break into this business given the strict requirements.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 11:13 PM
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posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 12:15 AM
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posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 02:08 AM
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