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Professional Locksmith

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posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 06:25 PM
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Hey, I was just wondering if we have any professional locksmiths as ATS members. I'm thinking of starting a second career and wondered if you would provide any feedback on this career. The goal is to be an independent business and work for myself.

Cheers!




posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


Yea me too....

I wanna be a very handy person and want to Learn as many skills as i can



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by ElOmen
 


I see a lot of online training for locksmith. Cheap tuition that's affordable. Tools and equipment provided so there is some hands-on training. I'm sure in-class instruction would be superior but the price is right for the online stuff.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


I was in the past, there are many variables to factor, way to many for me to type.

The best money is in doing 24hr service on autos, but late at night can get dicey, airbags kinda suck too.


edit on 14-6-2012 by potatotomato2 because: typo



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by potatotomato2
reply to post by Cosmic911
 


I was in the past, there are many variables to factor, why to many for me to type.

The best money is in doing 24hr service on autos, but late at night can get dicey, airbags kinda suck too.



Thanks for the heads up. I have heard that the side airbags are tricky. Good tip bout 24 hr service! Thanks.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


My father did this as a full time secondary profession.
Back when, you could have made a run of it but nowadays with home despot and the mega-low-mart taking all of the key cutting business, it just wouldn't be worth it. (just my opinion)
Plus many keys now have specific/angled cuts with thousands of possible keyways plus some have chips in them.
There will be a huge startup cost, not to mention some huge skill needed.
Make sure you can pick most any lock via pickgun, picks, bumping, Etc.
Learn impressioning among many other quirks and tricks.
Locksmithing is not something you can just jump into like many other professions.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


Go on Reddit, search 'Locksmith' and you will find more than a handful of AMA's ('ask me anything'... if you aren't familiar with Reddit).
I have spent a good few hours reading some of the threads there, some very good info to be had.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 07:04 PM
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reply to post by g146541
 


Surely the costs arn't that much compared to most other professions in this area? To give us an idea could you let us know what kit you need? I swear most locksmiths I have encountered before only have a dozen tools or so, then again I might have only seen dodgy ones.

I remember a warning going around a while ago for locksmiths who were ripping people off making out that it's a really complicated process and then they gain access with just simple or no tools. It seems like a good skill, but I imagine you'l need to find an area with little competition unless you charge very cheap fee's People like experience when they read adds. I've recently stated a small business as a part time thing outside work making more money and a lot is involved in just getting your adverts noticed from the mass of others, Is actually pretty interesting,

Anyway I duno about the states but locksmiths often charge stupid amounts of money for even the most simple call outs to gain access when someone's locked themselves out for example. IS that nit the case stateside?



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


I also should mention that regular residental (Normal hours) service pays very well, new locks, re-keying old locks, removing keys busted in locks, installing different locks, etc, all very easy jobs. Another down side to automotive is car's locks/locking systems/air bag sensors change design/parts pretty often and vary more in design from manufacter to manufacter than regular home door locks. It's generally considered better (From the people I've worked with and/or for) to specialize in one or the other. I may be able to tell you more if you would like to give specifics, but you'll have to bare with me , I type very slow. Regardless, all the best
edit on 14-6-2012 by potatotomato2 because: Forgot "I"



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


to cut some costs, make your own locksmithing tools.

1. download the patterns online
2. then get some hacksaw blades and a grinder.
3. ????
4. profit



-subfab



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by potatotomato2
 


Thanks for the info. I imagine starting off small, day and night servicing for auto lock outs, house lock-outs, broken locks, etc. Small. Yes, it seems the auto's are getting more and more complicated; transponders, key fabs, etc.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by subfab
 


I'm not sure I'm that handy!



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 07:51 PM
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reply to post by The Heed
 


Thank you. I'll check that out now.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by g146541
 


Thanks for replying.



Back when, you could have made a run of it but nowadays with home despot and the mega-low-mart taking all of the key cutting business, it just wouldn't be worth it. (just my opinion)

If my only intention was key cutting, you'd probably be right. But I imagine including auto and home lock-outs, including day and night hours, busted keys in locks, etc. I hope anyways!



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by clintdelicious
 




Anyway I duno about the states but locksmiths often charge stupid amounts of money for even the most simple call outs to gain access when someone's locked themselves out for example. IS that nit the case stateside?

I know charges for lock-outs on the overnight, or off-hours, are typically more than day hours rates.
I know I'll hate getting out of a warm bed during the dead of winter to unlock someone's door. lol



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


This made sound odd, but ifyou have never worked on a lock, yahoo image search "Inside of a house lock"

on the 1st page there are a couple of good shots of the workings of some old style and new home locks.

It will give you a good idea of what goes on in those 2 styles of basic home locks.

I guy I worked with had his nose broken by the steering wheel airbag while trying to change ignitions, it happens, not

really his fault, but regardless that was a 500 dollar loss for the business (Being liable). Side airbags are the worry for

door entry, just as pricey to replace. In my opinion if you want to start small, put off automotive for now. Best of luck



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 08:18 PM
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Originally posted by potatotomato2
reply to post by Cosmic911
 


This made sound odd, but ifyou have never worked on a lock, yahoo image search "Inside of a house lock"

on the 1st page there are a couple of good shots of the workings of some old style and new home locks.

It will give you a good idea of what goes on in those 2 styles of basic home locks.

I guy I worked with had his nose broken by the steering wheel airbag while trying to change ignitions, it happens, not

really his fault, but regardless that was a 500 dollar loss for the business (Being liable). Side airbags are the worry for

door entry, just as pricey to replace. In my opinion if you want to start small, put off automotive for now. Best of luck




Wow, that sounds painful! Ouch! As far as being liable, I see some locksmiths are "bonded," does that cover you at all for incidents like that with the airbag deployment?

I'll definitely check out those pics online. Thank you!



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 08:23 PM
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reply to post by potatotomato2
 


I found this picture interesting.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


I've been "Retired" for 10 years, so I'm not totally current, but what being Bonded in NYS was, basically insurance you carry so that if a customer wants to sue you THEIR legal fees are covered. To do this you have to get Bonded which is finger printing (Copies to the authorities) and lengthy background check buy the policy seller, anything iffy and they won't bond/insure you, they can drop or un-bond you if you get in trouble. My employeer did away with it because too many people wan't to sue (For free for them) over COMPLETELY ridicous stuff, that had nothing to do with anything job related.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


That's a good pic of the basic general workings of a cylinder lock, that is great for a guide. You can buy cheap kwik-set (The 5 pin ones) at any hardware store, about 10 bucks in NYS, they are great to monkey around with, especially if you have a full service locksmith around you to by pins/wafers/tumblers (Kinda like ground hog/woodchuck) from, so you can re-key and do master key systems (Having him cut the keys). (Master key systems are basically 20 or so locks that all have different keys, none of the 20 keys will open ANY other door, however there is a master key to them all, this is due to adding wafers and the math of possiable combinations depend on manufacter). Landlords LOVE master key systems, especially the small and the new ones, it amazes some of them that they don't have to carry 20 keys to get into their 20 apartments. It is a easy to sell service to anyone with way to many keys, most don't even mind bying a few new locks to match manufacters if need be.




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