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The Egyptian military overthrows parliament and takes control

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posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 12:18 PM
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The supreme court of egypt has invalided the results of the most recent parliamentary elections. They stated they are unconstitutional and therefore null and void.

In the wake of this decision, the military council has come forward and exerted "legislative control".

Seems like the makings for a civil war to me....

www.cnn.com...

Also the headline on drudge right now:

drudgereport.com...
edit on 14-6-2012 by KnawLick because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 12:48 PM
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So far it sounds like justice is being served with the public the winners in this decision. The Muslim brotherhood looks to be the ones missing out as there are not enough independent politicians in congress as defined in the constitution. It is only standard that the army take control again until a new election is performed.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by KnawLick
 


Darn good, this was needed. The brotherhood does not need control.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by kwakakev
 


Nope, you're missing the point. The people elected the government, the military are the old guard of the Mubarak regime.

This is a military coup by Mubarak loyalists who want to turn the revolution back and install their own dictatorship. And they are being supported by the old guard courts too, the same ones who recently gave permission for the former leader (under Mubarak) to run for election again - an election that most believe would be corrupt and violent, supported by the military.

Whether you like the idea of the brotherhood or not, that is not your choice, it is the choice of the people of Egypt. It's an evolutionary step in the right direction, and if their elected government fails to give the people the respect, freedoms and stability they are demanding, they will be overthrown too.

This is the old regime clinging to power, and it leaves only one explanation and only one solution - the revolution was not complete, they should not have stopped with the removal of the Mubarak gang. They should have destroyed the courts and the military at the same time and started from scratch without ANY of the old guard still in positions of authority.

There were people saying it at the end of the revolution (or the first stage of it at least), and the calls for the removal of all vestiges of the totalitarian regime to be wiped out have been rising. And this is why those voices should have been heeded.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by detachedindividual
 


That's basically what the iranian's did... It can be tricky to be a dictatorship for 80 years and then in short order establish a democracy, frequently leads to mixed results.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 02:08 PM
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reply to post by detachedindividual
 


it is not that the brotherhood is the 'choice' of the egyptian people, it is that the vote between who should lead is too divided dear. The brotherhood does not hold sway over any majority of the people.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by detachedindividual
 


You maybe right, I am just trying to understand the situation like the rest of the world. With all the mess and power plays going on it is important to watch all the angles.

Mubarak's old regime did not come close to gaining the seats required for power as the Muslim brotherhood held a majority in parliament. The point of legal issue is that 1/3 of the seats where not held by independents according to the constitution. From what I understand, Egypt does not want a single party with a clear majority as it is quite an culturally diverse country. The discrimination when a single party is in full control is clear so some limitations and checks are important, hence the independents.

Under this situation I am not sure how Mubarak's regime can ascend to power without massive vote rigging and repeating the same problem that caused this disillusion of parliament. With how the Egyptian people have responded I find highly unlikely they would put up with such a situation and return to the streets.



if their elected government fails to give the people the respect, freedoms and stability they are demanding, they will be overthrown too.


This is where I see the courts have stepped in and done this with the primary issue the balance of power. Egypt is not one party or ideology, but quite a colourful and diverse mix. Unless parliament can reflect the diversity of the population it will not be able to respond to its diverse needs and desires.

But then if you are right, Mubarak's regime will increase in seats as well as having increased support from the independents. The election process is very much critical as to how it all plays out, it should not take as long as last time to get moving as there is more familiarity with these chaotic periods.

If the last election was reasonably fair and the next one is as well then the numbers between Mubarak's regime and the Muslim brotherhood should remain fairly even with the main change being an increase in the independents. If any party is in a position to capitalise on this situation, then Mubarak's regime may have a chance, but it has got a lot of cheating to do.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by detachedindividual
 


They should have destroyed the courts and the military at the same time and started from scratch without ANY of the old guard still in positions of authority.

They should have destroyed,,everything
,,,,,,,,ya we get it,,,
but they didn't.
boo
hoo.




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