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Calling All Cat Lovers - Help Needed

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posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 06:55 PM
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My mother's cat is, in human years, in his 80's. He has arthritis in his left forepaw.

The vet has x-rayed it and prescribed chondroitin but nothing for the pain.

Have any of you had a similar experience with your cat?

Did your vet prescribe a painkiller of some kind (like kitty Tylenol or kitty ibuprofen)? If so, what?

Heartfelt thanks in advance. Mom's kitty is in a lot of pain.

DFB

edit on 6/13/2012 by disgustingfatbody because: SPELLING




posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by disgustingfatbody
 


prednisone is good for cats, so is low doses of buffered aspirin.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by DoctorMobius
 

I heard dogs only get 12mg. of aspirin. I can't imagine how to dose a cat.

The vet doesn't seem to want to ease the cat's pain.

Last resort, we will try another vet.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:09 PM
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blog.petmeds.com...--Qk


Because of unique liver metabolism, cats do not handle aspirin very well if given at high doses, and even one adult Tylenol tablet (325 to 500 mg) could be lethal and deadly to cats. Even minimal levels of exposure to Tylenol can quickly cause depression, vomiting, difficulty breathing, brown discoloration of the gums, respiratory distress, and swelling of the paws and face.

Fulminant liver failure can occur with even minimal dosages. If you’ve made the mistake of giving your cat ANY Tylenol and/or your cat has been given aspirin that causes some of these symptoms, immediate and emergency medical attention is needed. In fact, to demonstrate how sensitive cats are to these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, when cardiologists prescribe aspirin to cats with certain types of heart disease, it’s at the reduced dose of one half baby aspirin every second to third day.


I wouldn't give aspirin to a cat, even low dose.
Hopefully the supplement the vet gave, will reduce swelling enough to take away the pain.

I had an older dog that started to develop hip pain. The vet gave her a chondroitin type supplement that had her running around the yard within 3 days, pain free

She was on the chondroitin supplement, a maintenance dose, for the rest of her life.
edit on 13-6-2012 by snowspirit because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by disgustingfatbody
 


I don't have an exact answer for you...but I did find a website...that has some good information on it. Don't give your Mom's cat anything...until you have studied this information....please be careful...and if I find out anything more I will let you know.

pets.webmd.com...



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by caladonea
 

Hey, thanks for the link.

The chondroitin isn't working.

We have no intention of giving the cat anything without speaking to a vet first.

I just want to prepare my argument based on the experience of other cat owners (EXPERTS!).

My mother is beside herself. She's talking about putting the cat down. He's 13.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by disgustingfatbody
 


When did you take the cat to the vet? Supplements like chondroitin sometimes take a few days to work, they take away the pain by reducing swelling.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:35 PM
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If the medicine the vet prescribed doesn't work soonI would call
the vet and let them know the cat is in pain. The vet probably
thought the med would help the pain. If this doesn't work call
another vet. Do not give the cat anything without consulting
with a professional. Hope he returns to good health soon.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 

One month ago and last week.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by disgustingfatbody
reply to post by snowspirit
 

One month ago and last week.




My last 2 cats lasted over 19 years. Which was really hard when they passed, I'd spent almost half my life with them.
Many cats don't live that long though. One of mine had a stroke, so it was time. The other was healthy until at 19.5 years she decided to not eat anymore. She decided herself when to go....I took her into the vet before she starved to death, it was hard to do.

What crazydaisy said above is very sensible. It's what I would do too.
Good luck...



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 

Yes, he's got a few years left in him. Her previous cat lived to 18.

I'll take the cat before I let her put him down over this. He's a good cat and I have a great vet whom I know will help.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 08:09 PM
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My 20 year old kitty loves to be held and petted. Sometimes physical affection and attention go a long way in pain management. Anybody with a sick child knows TLC (tender loving care) makes a huge difference in recovery.

If holding hurts, just talking to them and gentle stroking or brushing helps too.

If getting around is difficult for her, move her food, water and kitty litter nearer to where she sleeps. Actually, I would put extra food, water and kitty boxes out. Old habits die hard and you don't want to confuse kitty.

Good luck with your Mom's baby.
edit on 6/13/2012 by sad_eyed_lady because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 08:23 PM
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reply to post by sad_eyed_lady
 

Believe me when I tell you my mom is a great kitty mom.

That cat is spoiled rotten. Goes outside, gets brushed constantly, etc. She dotes on him like a fourth child.

He's a Himalayan, chocolate-point.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 08:34 PM
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I had a himilayan cat that was 19 when he died. Your Mom's kitty still has some life left. I hope something can be done for the pain soon. Poor kitty!



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by Night Star
 

Except for that leg he's a very healthy cat.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 09:27 PM
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reply to post by disgustingfatbody
 



She dotes on him like a fourth child.


I changed the wording in my post from "her buddy" to "her baby".


All that love will break her heart when kitty does pass on. Might think of getting her a new little baby when the time comes.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by sad_eyed_lady
 

She's 75. She says this is her last cat.

She has Alzheimer's, so it's a good decision.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by disgustingfatbody
 


Copy that, I have a 3 year old kitty that I hope I can enjoy for the rest of her life.
I've been changing kitty litter for more years than I care to remember.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 10:37 PM
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reply to post by sad_eyed_lady
 

I hear that. Our family has had kitties continuously since the 30's.



posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 02:19 AM
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Ask about Metacam, our cat originally got this for kidney problems but it seems to relieve the arthritis in her back legs too. After her dose, she dashes about like a kitten!



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