It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

'Oldest galaxy' discovered using Hawaii telescope

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 04:28 PM
link   


A team of Japanese Astronomers using telescopes on Hawaii say they have seen the oldest Galaxy yet 12.91 billion light years away




The Japanese team calculates its galaxy was formed 12.91 billion light-years ago, and their research will be published in the Astrophysical Journal.


Richard Ellis from the California Institute of Technology said



the Japanese claim is more "watertight," using methods that everyone can agree on. But he said it's not much of a change from a similar finding by the same team last year.




Still, "it's the most distant bullet-proof one that everybody believes


A light year is the distance light travels in a year
About 6 Trillion miles
Will this team prove their findings before the others doing the same research

www.guardian.co.uk...
news.yahoo.com...

Cran




posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 05:34 PM
link   
reply to post by cranspace
 


The other teams searching for ancient galaxies found these




In 2010, a French team using NASA 's Hubble Space Telescope claimed to have discovered a galaxy from 13.1 billion light-years ago and last year a California team using Hubble said they saw a galaxy from 13.2 billion light-years ago


However they have yet to confirm their findings using other methods
Picture for representative purpose
It may look like this



www.deccanchronicle.com...

Cran



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 06:22 PM
link   
reply to post by cranspace
 


oh yeah! well my friend once saw one 13.3 billion light years away!!

so did they only see one distant galaxy, and it was near nothing else?,, no signs of radiation or galaxies beyond it?



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 06:58 PM
link   
reply to post by ImaFungi
 





oh yeah! well my friend once saw one 13.3 billion light years away


Thats impressive he must have a big telescope
Have you looked in his eyepiece
And seen the light coming at you at 6 trillion mph



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 11:05 AM
link   
reply to post by cranspace
 


What a totally incomprehensible distance,12.91 BILLION light years...
I would love to have the brain power to be able to visualize such a distance.

So,if the big bang is the correct theory(which I believe we have yet to prove beyond doubt)-lets say the BB happened 14 billion light years away from us.

How far away from us is the edge of the universe?
Do we have that figure?
If so,we could estimate the diameter of our universe more accurately.
(14 billion +distance from earth to edge of universe x2 = diameter of universe)
Does that make sense?




posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 11:10 AM
link   
reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 


wouldnt by the time the light from the farthest edges of the universe reached us,, the galaxies themselves have travelled billions of light years further?



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 11:17 AM
link   
reply to post by ImaFungi
 


Oh dear...
You are correct of course,obvious really.

Maths was never my strong point.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 03:30 PM
link   
reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 





What a totally incomprehensible distance,12.91 BILLION light years

It is and when you add 6 trillion miles per hour it gets more mind boggling
I always though the big bang would be at the centre of the universe with the galaxies and space expanding away from it i could be wrong though

Cran



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 04:19 PM
link   
I'm completely speechless. A galaxy 12-13 billion light years away. Just wow.

I wonder what it looks like nowadays =O



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 05:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by cranspace
Thats impressive he must have a big telescope
Have you looked in his eyepiece
And seen the light coming at you at 6 trillion mph

Light travels at about 670,680,000 mph (or 186,300 miles/second). 6 trillion miles is how far light travels in a year.


Originally posted by Silcone Synapse
So,if the big bang is the correct theory(which I believe we have yet to prove beyond doubt)-lets say the BB happened 14 billion light years away from us.

How far away from us is the edge of the universe?
Do we have that figure?
If so,we could estimate the diameter of our universe more accurately.
(14 billion +distance from earth to edge of universe x2 = diameter of universe)
Does that make sense?

There's no "edge" to the universe and there's no single point where the Big Bang happened, because everything contained within the Universe was also contained within the Big Bang.

The farthest away we can "see" is to a point close to the beginning of time, less than a billion years after the Big Bang. There's an upper limit to what we could ever see, though, because light didn't even have the means of being transmitted through space until about 300,000 years after the Big Bang happened. The Cosmic Background Radiation we can observe is from about 380,000 years after the Big Bang:

science.nasa.gov...

That's the oldest thing we can observe, might be the oldest thing that is even possible to observe.

Though the Observable Universe is about 14 billion light years in radius from our location (double that for its diameter), the size of the Universe is at least 90 times bigger because the Universe expands in all directions. Our region of observable space is just one small fraction of the total size of the Universe and we will never be able to see past those points because after a certain point, space is expanding faster than light can travel, so its forever beyond our reach to observe (unless somehow the light barrier is broken, I guess).


Originally posted by ImaFungi
wouldnt by the time the light from the farthest edges of the universe reached us,, the galaxies themselves have travelled billions of light years further?

Yes, they are no longer anywhere near the same location and probably look nothing now like they did then.


Originally posted by cranspace
I always though the big bang would be at the centre of the universe with the galaxies and space expanding away from it i could be wrong though

As stated above, the Big Bang has no location, as what comprised the Big Bang includes everything in existence. It's not one point that everything is shooting out from, it's everything in existence coming into being and expanding away from everything else.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 06:34 PM
link   
reply to post by LifeInDeath
 





the Big Bang has no location


It has to have a location somewhere a single point in space where the big bang occured we just do not have the science tech to pinpoint it at this time

Cran



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 07:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by cranspace
reply to post by LifeInDeath
 





the Big Bang has no location


It has to have a location somewhere a single point in space where the big bang occured we just do not have the science tech to pinpoint it at this time

No, before the Big Bang there was no space. There just wasn't, the Big Bang happened, then there was. What we think of as the void of space actually has a structure in three dimensions, and a fourth that's different called time. Before the Big Bang this structure didn't exist.




top topics



 
1

log in

join