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Farmers plead to use their own wells

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posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 01:11 AM
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Didn't know whether to put this in this forum or Fragile Earth or just under current events but after reading the article and the BS with the lawmakers, I put it under Political Issues forum. Mods please move if not in the correct forum.

Basically the farmers in Greeley, CO. are facing the possibility of losing their crops because the courts have refused them permission to use water right under their feet, groundwater that is rising and actually seeping into basements.

Say what???


GREELEY, Colo. – Lawmakers in Colorado say they want a study of groundwater issues in the northeastern part of the state where farmers have been banned from pumping from their wells for several years.

But farmers and local officials there say this historic drought is an emergency and the governor should use his executive authority to bypass the judiciary.



Now an estimated 200 farmers have met in a show of solidarity, signing a statement to the government that if they are not allowed to turn on their wells and irrigate their crops they will not be able to pay taxes next yea


This is crazy politics at play for sure. Makes me wonder who would benefit from this.

Can you say Monsanto??


Several farmers testified that if the state did not give them the ability to pump within a matter of days they would be in danger of losing entire fields.



Gene Kammerzell, who operates a large nursery, said that he doesn’t have enough water to keep crops alive.

“Without turning on the wells, I have an $8.34 million dollar crop in jeopardy unless we get substantial rainfall in the next 10 days.”

He went on to point out that the volume of groundwater in the aquifer they were seeking to pump from consists of 10.5 million acre-feet. One acre-foot is about 326,000 gallons.


Man, this is terrible. Hopefully the governor will step in and help:


“The governor has the authority to order the wells turned on based on his authority to declare the imminent possibility of a disaster whether natural or man-made and this certainly qualifies,” he said. “The groundwater issue is man-made because of the wells being shut down. This is a very real disaster today and the government has a responsibility to protect people in times like this.”

County officials stated they agree with the farmers and plan to take swift action.



WND previously reported on the issue that has been created by the state Supreme Court’s decision in 2006 to order 440 wells shut down and another 1,000 curtailed.


The wonderful decision of the prestigious Supreme Court.

I hope the governor will step in and take action and not back down. I don't know the behind the scenes on what the do's and don'ts are with crops but this sounds ridiculous. Especially when the water table has sufficient amount of water to irrigate the fields. At least for a few months any way.....


www.wnd.com...




posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 02:42 AM
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In Colorado, do land rights not include water and mineral rights?

This notion has been on my mind lately. It seems to me that if you can own land, you own it and everything in it.

The issue is easy to remedy. If the farmers own the land and the wells to pump from, pump the water and be prepared to defend their land if someone comes to shut it off. Nothing like a national headline "Farmers at gunpoint" to save their crops, their livelihoods, and their property to get American's pissed off.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 02:56 AM
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I wouldn't be surprised if the water became mysteriously contaminated all of a sudden resulting in loss of crops, illness, or death. I hope the "little guy" can get enough support and attention to make it right and stop the madness.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 03:05 AM
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Originally posted by Wolf321
In Colorado, do land rights not include water and mineral rights?

This notion has been on my mind lately. It seems to me that if you can own land, you own it and everything in it.

The issue is easy to remedy. If the farmers own the land and the wells to pump from, pump the water and be prepared to defend their land if someone comes to shut it off. Nothing like a national headline "Farmers at gunpoint" to save their crops, their livelihoods, and their property to get American's pissed off.


Regardless of owning the rights to water or not, there are still all kinds of loopholes you must jump through to access it. My family has a water well and owns rights but in order to actually use the water and sell it to nearby landowners you must be licensed by the state. I live in Texas but I'm sure this state has similar laws in place.

Even once you are licensed government agents will still come out and test the water at intervals, make sure your pumping station and holding tank are up to code and all that. If you aren't coded or fail the water test they will shut you down. You do however, have the right to decide to fluoride or not to fluoride.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 03:27 AM
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I'm not a farmer, I know nothing of underground water and who owns what if it's under your land but this type of story makes me seriously MAD!

As mad as I've been all year when the hosepipe ban started in south england. The rules got crazier as the months went on. The law will be onto you if you fill your child's blow up paddling pool using a hose, but it's okay to fill it using a watering can. True apparently. And there are thousands of leaks in the whole water system, leaking millions of gallons, but instead of fixing them they put water prices up and tell you not to water your lawn. And then the worst bit. I read that Thames water is owned -OWNED- by Australia, China and god knows who else.

What the feck happened in the world, that businesses can sell your water to you, hold it back from you, extort higher and higher amounts of money from you, and make profit from your water?

When they do this in Scotland I'll personally start WW3.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 03:37 AM
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I really was hoping that there would be some language in the article indicating that the water was unsafe to drink/use for crops. Nope, just that the farmers don't have seniority in 'water rights'. I'm disgusted. They aren't even asking to use the water indefinitely, only until the drought ceases. Perhaps we should not be biting the hand that feeds us.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 04:07 AM
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If there really are 200 farmers affected, why not first try to gather more like-minded farmers and then start pumping water.
To hell with someone telling them they have "no right".
If enough people stand in solidarity the will of the people will be done - if they hang a few out to dry the people will get what they deserve.
Sooner or later we will learn that we must unite to change what we cannot live with.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 08:12 AM
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reply to post by snarky412
 


In Texas we have what is known as "right of capture" for the landowner, regardless of who owns mineral rights.

Downside of this: our local spring has been dry for 30 years, as the farmers for 200 miles north have pumped the aquifer dry to water their crops.




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