It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

New Low for Unions

page: 2
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 05:19 PM
link   
Reading comprehension is a good thing


There had already been an agreement in place that, since by law food has to be served to students within a certain amount of time since it was prepared and may not be reheated, that cafeteria workers could take the food for themselves. The school decided to start charging them for it without changing the standing agreement or meeting to renegotiate a new one. If the employees don't buy it, it gets thrown away so what difference does it make if they take it or not? Such tears over such nonsense.

Next up: Stocks rise for Kleenex today.




posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 05:58 PM
link   
Yeah reading comprehension is a good thing:

They fought for their "collective right" to eat free expired food.

edit on 11-6-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 06:08 PM
link   
reply to post by neo96
 


From your link:

The grievance was based on the allegation that the school district “violated established past practice” in charging cafeteria workers for food or drinks that couldn’t be sold or consumed by students. These items would include food or drinks with expired dates or foods that had been reheated, none of which can be served to students according to safe food regulations.

But according to the settlement, cafeteria employees indeed can eat and drink those expired or reheated items – at their own risk. And they don’t have to pay for them.


As an early childhood teacher I know exactly what this means. Food cannot be reheated. Expiration dates on food are well in advance of actual expiration and any food that has been out for 30 minutes or more cannot be given to a child. So if the cafeteria had left over pizza from lunch and lunch is over why can't the workers eat it?



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 06:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by neo96
Yeah reading comprehension is a good thing:

They fought for their "collective right" to eat free expired food.

edit on 11-6-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)


They fought because the school violated the contract.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 08:10 AM
link   
reply to post by neo96
 


still waiting for your explanation of how much of "your tax dollars" are being wasted

or why we should care about cafeteria workers eating leftovers for free,
rather than wasting food by tossing it in the trash,
as common in the west as a dog pissing on food when he's too full to eat anymore.


other than a wannabe "corporate overlord's " obvious hatred for unions
or anybody else trying to take the slavers whip out of your hands.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 08:22 AM
link   
The union practice is code for:

Oops I "accidentally" microwaved too many cinnamon rolls for breakfast. Turns out we had 50 kids coming for school breakfast and I "accidentally" heated 54 cinnamon rolls.... Their still hot! Who wants one?!?!?!

In other words, workers eating for free, and calling it wastage. An excess of food gets prepared for every meal, and it is predictably enough to feed all the cooks for free.

In Texas last year, there was a similar story from "Death Row" in the prisons. Condemned prisoners were ordering last meals that were like, "7 cheeseburgers, 7 orders of french fries, a six pack of cokes and 1 pepsi." (There were six guards on duty for the prisoner's last meal")

Workers taking a bite is commonplace at institutions. It was when I worked in foodservice in college. Employees "made a mistake" with desserts far more often than with salads. Once in a while a patron would complain about an extra dessert showing up on their bill--and know one knew how it could have happened!



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 11:06 AM
link   
Just want to add that ive worked in catering and products being "out of date" is usually only a guidance - a legal one at that. Considering the amount of people starving in the world and the continually rising price's of food - especially good, nutritious food, i say good on the Unions.

Less waste, worker save's money. Win win for me.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 11:11 AM
link   

Originally posted by Kali74
reply to post by neo96
 


From your link:

The grievance was based on the allegation that the school district “violated established past practice” in charging cafeteria workers for food or drinks that couldn’t be sold or consumed by students. These items would include food or drinks with expired dates or foods that had been reheated, none of which can be served to students according to safe food regulations.

But according to the settlement, cafeteria employees indeed can eat and drink those expired or reheated items – at their own risk. And they don’t have to pay for them.


As an early childhood teacher I know exactly what this means. Food cannot be reheated. Expiration dates on food are well in advance of actual expiration and any food that has been out for 30 minutes or more cannot be given to a child. So if the cafeteria had left over pizza from lunch and lunch is over why can't the workers eat it?



I suppose some people are not content with the fact that life is hard and so they go out of their way to make it harder, for everyone. Slave-mentality imo.



new topics

top topics



 
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join