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U.V. Rays at record High...

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posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 02:31 PM
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Now I am just your average everyday redneck. You know go out in 100+ degree heat doing construction to make ends meat along with blackjack and dog breeding as well as making large magnet rakes and takin them on the sides of the back roads and highways down here. I also do a couple of other things, but that is neither here nor there in terms of being your business.

Anyways I have always been a red neck mother trucker. Working out in the scorching southern sun. So I have worked up a pretty thick skin that does not get easily sun burned, and has not blistered since I was a young buck. First construction work I had to do this year was today. Leveling out the ground in a 20x20 spot in 30 minutes for a patio extention. Then poured mesh poured mesh poured. and finished. $1600 less than 4 hours of work. I got burnt and I only did 30 minutes of work while I supervised in the truck. Like I said I always work in stuff like this all my life and never in the past 20 years have I been this burnt. Out in the sun for only 30 minutes.

Those solar flares are doing a lot more damage than TPTB are telling us. They cant destroy the magnetic field but they probably can weaken it for long extended periods of time. And our ozone has to be wide the truck open. I used to say well we been punching holes in the atmosphere for coming up on 75+ years. But now I think astroids been punching hundreds of thousands if not millions or billions of holes in the atmosphere for billions of years. And from what I understand there were already satellites up there before "We" being modern man before we launched our first.???


Not that surprising if you think about it though




posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 03:11 PM
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Not exactly sure how to explain your case - other than it could be age. Your skin cells don't replicate as frequently or as accurately as you age (some divisions fail due to erosion of the telomeres that cause codon corruption).

I got burned once this season while breaking down our forward operating base - tanned out nicely as I always do. Haven't had a problem since even though I'm currently in the Persian Gulf on "12 hour" day shifts (work is a 16 hour affair at a minimum) and standing in the sun all day without sun screen.

I don't think what you've experienced is due to a global issue or some issue with the ozone.

I'll also say that you should do as I say and not as I do: wearing some kind of UV protection (be it rated clothing or a cream/spray application) is a good idea. While your body will produce melanin to absorb UV radiation - UV wavelengths are shorter than the width of DNA molecules. They can and do impose thermal forces and molecular shearing forces that can cause damage to your cell lines over time.

Cancer is not really the "worst" part. Some tan is fine and healthy - too much UV exposure, however, can functionally age your skin decades beyond the rest of your body - which is an issue if you plan to be around at 65. Having the skin of an 80 or 90 year old while trying to be the 65 year old grandparent you want to be can be a frustrating arrangement.



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by Aim64C
 

This appears to be a duplicate thread. Take a look at my data posted HERE.

EPA data from Denver shows a strong trend towards more "Extreme UV" days each year over the last 15 years. The hard data proves the OP is correct, UV levels appear to be trending up.

Best regards,
Z



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by ringlejames
Now I am just your average everyday redneck. You know go out in 100+ degree heat doing construction to make ends meat along with blackjack and dog breeding as well as making large magnet rakes and takin them on the sides of the back roads and highways down here. I also do a couple of other things, but that is neither here nor there in terms of being your business.

You have to respect a person with clear boundaries.


Anyways I have always been a red neck mother trucker. Working out in the scorching southern sun. So I have worked up a pretty thick skin that does not get easily sun burned, and has not blistered since I was a young buck. First construction work I had to do this year was today. Leveling out the ground in a 20x20 spot in 30 minutes for a patio extention. Then poured mesh poured mesh poured. and finished. $1600 less than 4 hours of work. I got burnt and I only did 30 minutes of work while I supervised in the truck. Like I said I always work in stuff like this all my life and never in the past 20 years have I been this burnt. Out in the sun for only 30 minutes.

Those solar flares are doing a lot more damage than TPTB are telling us.

Actually, the departments responsible for the monitoring of these events have been pretty much accurate in thier attitudes toward the events on the sun as they have unfolded. We have been alerted that the sun has been approaching a period of intense activity with plenty of time to spare.


They cant destroy the magnetic field but they probably can weaken it for long extended periods of time. And our ozone has to be wide the truck open. I used to say well we been punching holes in the atmosphere for coming up on 75+ years. But now I think astroids been punching hundreds of thousands if not millions or billions of holes in the atmosphere for billions of years. And from what I understand there were already satellites up there before "We" being modern man before we launched our first.???


Not that surprising if you think about it though


The suns output and its effects on the magnetosphere are still being studied to determine the upper and lower limits of the capacity of the magnetosphere to protect us from the most harmful of its ejecta. However, one thing that needs no further research, is the importance of doing what one must to protect ones self from sun damage over time. I , personally speaking, burn like pig meat in sunshine, and have to coat myself in factor fifty even on grey summer days. It is important to remember that wether you burn or not, sun protection is there to prevent more than just the initial burning effects of sunlight. It also protects against the damage that you cannot so easily observe, like melanoma for example.

It is true that the sun seems more powerful in its tantrums these days, but the same protective strategies as have already been previously suggested by healthcare proffesionals for decades are still the best defense. Screw what the government tells you about the danger, put some factor fifty sun protection lotion on your skin, and cover up and take shelter at every oppertunity.



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 04:27 PM
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what about the Hole in the ozone?
thats gone quiet. any one know any info?

edit on 8-6-2012 by buddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by DrZrD
 



This appears to be a duplicate thread.


Technically speaking - that thread is the duplicate, as this is the earliest post. Which is why I posted here instead of the later thread.

Of course, predictably, that same logic did not exactly follow with the majority of the posting population.


EPA data from Denver shows a strong trend towards more "Extreme UV" days each year over the last 15 years. The hard data proves the OP is correct, UV levels appear to be trending up.


Forgive me for being something of a skeptic when it comes to climate data claiming to prove any kind of trend aside from chaos.

I have to get some sleep before work in the morning - so I will just ask a few questions that I would normally attempt to research on my own.

What is an "extreme UV day?"

What is the calibration history of that particular station? The reason for this is that I find the data being graphed a bit unusual. It's like graphing: "Days it was over 95 degrees" as opposed to graphing an average temperature or even the daily/hourly recordings from the station. There may have been plenty of 94.5 degree days with only three 96+ degree days - enough to make the average temperature for that region 65 degrees (It's an arbitrary number). But another year with an average of 58 degrees may have had twenty days that peaked at 95.5 degrees.

Which is why I find the chosen metric a little awkward. It's not what you typically see, and suggests there is a bit of social engineering being done on the presentation of the statistics.

The other reason I would like to see the calibration history is to see if some recent change could have lead to a marginally higher reading on the average (even if it is a more accurate read) that could explain the almost instantaneous increase in "extreme UV days." 2004 and 2005 showed almost nothing and then you suddenly have 2006 showing double the number of 'extreme days' as the most intense years on record.

Is solar activity fluctuating that wildly? Or is it due to the arbitrary designation of an extreme UV day? Has the definition of an extreme UV day remained the same - if it has been reclassified - is the data reflecting that change?

Some of these can be brought about by honest mistakes on the part of scientists and researchers alike. Someone who simply counts all the days classified as "extreme UV" my miss the fact that some organization or group changed the definition of what classifies as extreme (not uncommon). The old records would show what was considered extreme, then - and the new records would show what is considered extreme now with no retroactive adjustments to the reporting.

Similarly - a more accurate sensor being installed can lead to higher readings as the device doesn't under-report the metric (which is typically the case - many devices error in favor of lower energy due to physics). Or a new calibration technician may alter the device to get more accurate or relevant readings (that had not been known about or taken into consideration when the monitoring station was designed).

The list of possibilities is quite large - which is why I'm curious to know more about how this data came to be.



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 07:08 AM
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Duplicate thread, please post your comments on this thread.

Thread closed.




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