US drone strikes 'raise questions' - UN's Navi Pillay

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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:16 AM
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reply to post by soon2beaher
 



i know that right now there is a smear campaig going on to try and convince th US public that the gov is not using drones for spying on them.


Perhaps it would help you, somewhat, to think about how you would go about spying on people.

Why do you spy on someone? Think about it from the "government's" position: You have their registered address, place of work, affiliated banks, car (with license plate number), photos, and even biometric information (particularly if the individual is prior service).

So, they don't really need to spy on you to figure out where you live, work, or find out what kind of car you drive. They aren't stalkers trying to figure this stuff out. If they want to rape you - all they have to do is send someone to do it.

So... that said... if the government believes it is lacking information about what you are doing, and decides it needs to covertly collect information about individuals and/or groups of individuals... what is the most sensible way for them to go about it?

Since we know what information they do have, already; let's look at information they do not have -directly- in their files. They don't necessarily know what stores you frequent, your travel patterns, your online identities and discussions, your phone conversations, and your personal conversations amongst social groups and close individuals.

Movement patterns can be tracked via electronic point-of-sale transactions (having set up agreements with banking institutions or inside sources). Alternatively, 'spy-ware' can be implemented on cellular phones to periodically resolve a GPS or network-triangulation location and upload it to a server using the phone's internet capabilities.

Theoretically speaking - these same phones could periodically trigger their mic and record bits of audio to be uploaded (provided the phone has certain capabilities - smart phones are a much better candidate for these types of spyware than simpler models).

Online identities can be tracked using spyware on computers as well as through analysis of internet traffic (not requiring a bugged computer per se). Network specialists can assist in these operations.

The resources necessary to implement and manage such intel gathering networks is enormous - but already exists in many other countries. The UAE, for example, is perhaps one of the most heavily 'bugged' countries on the planet. There are two internet providers here - both owned by the government; and all of it is subject to deep packet filtering.

So it can be done. Even if it may not be as perfect of an Eye of Sauron as they would like.

Where and why do drones enter the equation?

It's 70s era thinking. You're carrying around a device (a cell phone) that Cold War spies would have given their left nut for. Why would the government build a multi-million dollar drone that can only spy on you when you're outside, in the same general area it is? You carry the phone with you everywhere, into important meetings, while you're doing things you aren't supposed to (how cliche is calling the wife/girlfriend by accident in the middle of a passionate affair with another woman? )

I mean... really - what's more effective? Building a plane to watch you... or 'convincing' your phone that you need to be watched?

Think of it this way: You suspect your boyfriend/girlfriend of cheating on you. Where do you go? Use a souped up Havok Heli to track them... or do you check their text messages/call history on their phone (provided you get the chance)?

Trust your genetic instincts on this one. You evolved over millions of years to effectively identify when your mate was not being faithful (you wouldn't have many kids, otherwise in regards to males... and females would have to deal with competition for their mate's parental support). If you have a question about someone - much of the answers can be found using their phone and/or computer. The few that aren't can often be answered with the leg work of an anonymous proxy (far more efficiently and effectively than a drone).




posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by neformore
 


This constant emphasized distinction of drone vs... who knows what, really baffles me.
Do you think an F18 pilot dropping a bomb from 12000 feet can see his target better than an operator remotely flying a drone? Do you think he can tell whether innocent civilians are there or not when flying at 400 Knots, while a drone can circle the target area for hours and hours and receive precise coordinates via LASER designation systems or by other means, all without risking an air crew.

Why does it matter, except for a sensational headline and the opportunity to slander the US ?





 
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