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Behavioral Modernity (BM) defined

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posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 09:46 PM
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The link below is a series of pages that covers over the evidence for the shifting backwards the point where HSS became 'modern'




The point at which human beings became human beings—-that is to say, the point at which the physical frame of Homo sapiens was accompanied by modern behaviors—-was traditionally pegged as the end of the Middle Paleolithic and the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic, about 45,000 years ago. But research over the last twenty years has shown that the transition to what archaeologists and paleoanthropologists call "behavioral modernity" was not a point in time, but rather a process extending over many tens of thousands of years.


What is Behavioral Modernity?

Link to BM

This is the third of 8 pages on this subject, I recommend that you read all of them

So what do scholars mean when they say "behavioral modernity"? The list below shows the four main areas of human existence that saw change and growth between the Lower Paleolithic and the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic.


Ecology



Enlarged geographic range
Marine resource exploitation (fish and shellfish)


Technology



Bone tool technology
Projectile point technology
Stone tool technology involving blades and backed scrapers
Special purpose tools
Control of fire
Hafting and composite tools (atlatl)


Economy and Social organization



Specialized hunting for different species
Group (organized) hunting
Structured settlements, with hearths and living spaces
Use of complex language
Expanded exchange networks
Systematic burials of adults and children
Care for the elderly and infirm


Symbolic behavior



Use of red ochre
Personal ornaments (perforated shell beads)
Abstract symbols engraved into bone objects
Burials with grave goods


A list of webpages discussing which archaeological site provide evidence of BM

It is by this we became 'modern'




posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 09:56 PM
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Hi Hans,

Sorry to say but modernity equals piss poor management of the tool left at our feet.
A Clovis point was developed to provide food and protection for families .
Unlike a drone or IBM that is constructed to kill, destroy and disfigure humans.
sadly ljb

PS no better than chimps.
edit on 6/6/2012 by longjohnbritches because: CHIMPS



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 
Hiya Hans, hasn't a lot changed in the handful of years we've been on ATS?

In 2007, those 'bloody scientists/archaeologists' were denying our mixed heritage with Neanderthals. They were hiding the Truth about Denisovans and Floriensis and, get this, trying to tell us that there was NO water on the Moon! Those SoBs! They were trying to make us think that nobody had symbolic thought until some 'Great Leap Forward' in Europe 40kya. Clovis-First?! No way!

Well scientists - who's laughing now?

I'm joking, but we really have seen a lot of progress, across the board, in a short amount of time and it's easy to forget how much we should be celebrating the science of archaeology.

Back to Behavioural Modernity. These assemblages caught my imagination in recent years; small populations in coastal ecosystems and a world that (almost) still had the wrapping on it. I don't want to romanticise it too much (intestinal parasites, abscesses etc) and yet it was a world of such possibilities.

Rather than looking to Europe for evidence of early symbolic thought, it's no surprise that it's earliest evidence would be in Africa. Still, it must be a good day at work when something like this shows up...

Blombos pigment artefact


Typically human, we had the whole Earth in a pristine condition and someone thought, 'Tut. This place could really use brightening up....'



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 01:01 AM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
reply to post by Hanslune
 
Hiya Hans, hasn't a lot changed in the handful of years we've been on ATS?

In 2007, those 'bloody scientists/archaeologists' were denying our mixed heritage with Neanderthals. They were hiding the Truth about Denisovans and Floriensis and, get this, trying to tell us that there was NO water on the Moon! Those SoBs! They were trying to make us think that nobody had symbolic thought until some 'Great Leap Forward' in Europe 40kya. Clovis-First?! No way!

Well scientists - who's laughing now?

I'm joking, but we really have seen a lot of progress, across the board, in a short amount of time and it's easy to forget how much we should be celebrating the science of archaeology.

Back to Behavioural Modernity. These assemblages caught my imagination in recent years; small populations in coastal ecosystems and a world that (almost) still had the wrapping on it. I don't want to romanticise it too much (intestinal parasites, abscesses etc) and yet it was a world of such possibilities.

Rather than looking to Europe for evidence of early symbolic thought, it's no surprise that it's earliest evidence would be in Africa. Still, it must be a good day at work when something like this shows up...

Blombos pigment artefact


Typically human, we had the whole Earth in a pristine condition and someone thought, 'Tut. This place could really use brightening up....'



Are we members required to read all the subtle links to have a clue of what the Hell you are rambling on about?
Cause on the surface it's just sauce.
edit on 6/7/2012 by longjohnbritches because: e



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 01:13 AM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


Yes, it's an answer to, unfortunately for you, to a question well beyond your kin, lol
edit on 7/6/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 02:04 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


Yes, it's an answer to, unfortunately for you, to a question well beyond your kin, lol
edit on 7/6/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)

Hi Hans,
Can you translate this into something more modern than grunts?
Exactly whom do you refer to as my kin?



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:01 AM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 

He means 'ken'. You know, Barbie's boyfriend.

By Barbie I mean Klaus, of course.

It's not just this place that could use a little brightening up.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


Howdy Kandinsky

Yep it has been changing faster, the pace has been picking up. I've seen a remarkably change in the view of ancient man and civilizations since I read my first book in the archaeology theme, Thor's Aku Aku.

Fringe has also expanded extensively since usenet/internet came into being with more nonsense being bantered around than before, almost crowding out real science with its volume.

I expect even more remarkable changes in the future, especially in the way of DNA and more detections of Gobelki tepes and Catalhuyucks



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:21 AM
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Originally posted by Astyanax
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 

He means 'ken'. You know, Barbie's boyfriend.

By Barbie I mean Klaus, of course.

It's not just this place that could use a little brightening up.


Chuckle!

Kin...a class or group with similar characteristics




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