Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Asteroid or glitch? Google Sky user spots strange, undiscovered glowing rock in our solar system

page: 2
16
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join

posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 03:52 AM
link   
reply to post by DarknStormy
 


I was refering to this part of ngchunter's post:



The originals are much higher quality. In this case it looks like there was a piece of debris of some sort on the film plate when it was scanned (these plates are huge and this is just a small part of one plate).


I would like to check it.




posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 06:25 AM
link   

Originally posted by lamentiraestaahifuera
reply to post by DarknStormy
 


I was refering to this part of ngchunter's post:



The originals are much higher quality. In this case it looks like there was a piece of debris of some sort on the film plate when it was scanned (these plates are huge and this is just a small part of one plate).


I would like to check it.


stdatu.stsci.edu...
Real researchers always go straight to the primary source of any sky survey data, they don't "hunt for things on google sky."



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 06:46 AM
link   

Originally posted by LifeInDeath
Wow, the author of that article didn't even bother to ask an actual astronomer what the thing could be before writing the article, nor did the editors make that suggestion to him. They just instantly accepted one side of the story from one random guy who posts something on the internet. That's some truly terrible journalism for you.

What a terrible news source.


It's no surprise with the Daily Mail lately, they don't even seem to proof read anything let alone do decent research. It's getting shocking.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:13 AM
link   
Omg is this nibiru finally? Prepare yourselves for the blow!!

It's gonna be hitting probably soon, surely this year??? Anyhow, we can't really do much about it...



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:36 AM
link   

Originally posted by NoLoveInFear46and2
Omg is this nibiru finally? Prepare yourselves for the blow!!

No. Read the thread.


It's gonna be hitting probably soon, surely this year???

No. Read the thread. Furthermore, you couldn't tell that from a single image anyway, and this image was taken about 16 years ago.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:46 AM
link   
I sent a link to the article to my brother who is somewhat of an astronomy buff. Here is his reply:


I went to google sky to the coordinates in the article and I DID see the object they are talking about. I think someone at google or elsewhere is playing a joke. The images in google sky are very long exposure. The lens of the camera is open for many minutes or hours to get those detailed images of faint objects like galaxies. But an asteroid in the solar system would be moving and such a long exposure of an asteroid would show movement. The picture of the asteroid is too in focus for a long exposure of something moving. Someone is playing a hoax.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:54 AM
link   
reply to post by ngchunter
 


Thank you



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:56 AM
link   
According to UniverseToday it's just a glitch.

Earth Threatened By Glowing Green Asteroid?


If it’s close, it should have color issues and be bright. If it’s far, it’s too massive to have been missed. Outside of our solar system and it wouldn’t have any apparent motion and should be visible in other images. And it’s not.


In fact, searching the various databases from which Google Sky draws its data (SDSS, DSS, HST, IRAS, and WMAP), the killer asteroid doesn’t appear at all. Thus, it would seem that this object is nothing more than a technical glitch introduced by Google’s stitching together of images.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:56 AM
link   
That Alien ship has green light bulbs in it. They should have pulled the shades if they didn't want us to find it. I like the color of green, reminds me of looking at my eyes in the mirror.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:07 AM
link   
If it is real, then its a strange one. Looks fake, but the glow suggests interior heating? Nuclear maybe? Could be totally new to science. Keep an eye on that one.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:18 AM
link   

Originally posted by Suspiria
It's no surprise with the Daily Mail lately, they don't even seem to proof read anything let alone do decent research. It's getting shocking.


That also fits with CNN. iReporters are cheap!



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:33 AM
link   

Originally posted by Oannes
If it is real, then its a strange one. Looks fake, but the glow suggests interior heating? Nuclear maybe? Could be totally new to science. Keep an eye on that one.

That's not even what it looks like, it's just a defect on a film plate taken 16 years ago. Google sky sucks, it's not a primary source of any sky survey data and everything you see there is lower quality than the primary source material. When things only appear in single plates because they're defects, planes, satellites, etc, google's processing to make its all-sky mosaic runs into problems and really mucks up the image.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 10:01 AM
link   
"is an asteroid which is heading towards Earth. "

How would he know "it's heading towards Earth" - or how would he know it's an asteroid in the first place? Just by looking at a colored spot on an image in Google Space? That person must have an incredible knowledge to get such data just from looking at a picture. Truth is, he is more likely one of those idiots who doesn't even know the difference between a star and a planet - as most "doomsday people" are.

Credibility: ZERO



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 02:00 PM
link   
[img]
[/img]Try going to Google sky now and finding the coordinates, there is a large rectangle blacking out the section. Slight over kill to cover a small object. Rectify the glitch don't black out a large section.

edit on 7-10-2012 by rolfharriss because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 02:04 PM
link   
reply to post by rolfharriss
 


Go to the primary source for DSS sky survey data. Google sky is not the primary source. It's still there and it's still just a single plate defect.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 02:08 PM
link   

Originally posted by ngchunter
reply to post by rolfharriss
 


Go to the primary source for DSS sky survey data. Google sky is not the primary source. It's still there and it's still just a single plate defect.



See above image, black square. Odd?



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 03:35 PM
link   
reply to post by rolfharriss
 


Not odd. Google Sky a toy for the public, full of missing or corrupted data, atrifacts and bad stitching. As has been suggested, look at the original DSS data, for example at SkyView site. skyview.gsfc.nasa.gov... although that isn't entirely free of artifacts.

P.S. actually, www.sky-map.com... is a very good site. I haven't seen any blocked areas or bad artifacts there. Use that instead of Google Sky.
edit on 7-10-2012 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 03:41 PM
link   
reply to post by wildespace
 


Two days ago you could see it, I looked it myself.. Then today a black rectangle. These have to be deliberate wind-ups. If as it is claimed the data is old.. then where did the black rectangle appear from? This has been changed within the last few days.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 04:34 AM
link   
Let me add I do not believe this object is actually out there, but is designed to create fear and paranoia. To leave it there for a few months wait until it makes the news and then black out the whole patch. Like the SETI program which uses people's home computers to analyse data in the search for signals from space, perhaps Google sky is used in a similar way, put the data out there and get the public to help trawl it.. If they find something then it has to be dealt with by censoring it.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 07:46 AM
link   
reply to post by rolfharriss
 

These are completely baseless assumptions. Do you know how astronomy works? It has nothing to do with Google Sky or public opinions and reactions. Members of the public who are equipped with decent telescopes (amateur astronomers) are actually encouraged to search for new objects and report them. Images on Google Sky are decades-old. They are only good for getting generally familiar with the sky. Astronomers have better things to do than to leave something on Google Sky to cause agitation and then cover it up.


I suggest you join some astronomy forums or Facebook groups, and see how active and diligent amateur astronomers are. New comets and asteroids are discovered by them all the time.

Besides, an asteroid can never look like it supposedly does in those Google Sky images (unless it's just about to hit you). Asteroids are typically hundreds of thousands or even millions of miles away, and look like tiny and dim stars.





new topics

top topics



 
16
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join