It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Exceptional Rise in Ancient Sea Levels Revealed

page: 4
28
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 08:16 PM
link   
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Hey Hans ,
You are right about belligerent neighbors as the reason for walls, but there have been cities at the site for several millenia before the homeric troy, at least one was destroyed by earthquake, so actually the massive walls ate likely a response to seismic activity, nut the whole tsunami thing is something to ponder.
One thing I noticed looking the walls of troy VII is that they are sloped, now I don't know whether UK looking at the interior or exterior face of the wall, if it is the exterior wall a sloped wall makes no sense as a defensive wall but does in terms of earthquakes and related tsunamis.
Hans, one question how long does it take for a fairly large clam shell to degrade in an unprotected environment?.
The reason I ask this question is that I know of a place in remote baja california where there are huge middens a couple of miles inland from the coast.
This area is extremely sparsely populated to this day, so I'm thinking these middens likely are the product of the indigenous peoples, whom were a genetically and lingisticaly isolated tribe. Also not far from there I stumbled across some very very primative rock shelters , a little farther up the canyon.
A geologist friend of mine tells me this place is near some very old petroglyphs and some other rock shelters that have been dated to like 12k or so years ago.
Right now there are only maybe a dozen people that live within 20 miles of this place, and the size of theser middens is astounding some are the size of small house.




posted on Jun, 14 2012 @ 09:04 PM
link   
reply to post by punkinworks10
 


I don't know exactly how long a shell would last, depends of the environment but I would say/guestimate 10's to hundreds of thousands of years in a hostile environment and in a 'good' environment 10's of millions of years. certainly shells how up in limestone and the 'fossil' record



posted on Jun, 17 2012 @ 11:03 AM
link   

Originally posted by Hanslune
Yes in the modern world, you need to think back to the time period we are talking about. Just look where the earliest civilizations were, on rivers.


I am thinking about the time period we are talking about. The earliest civilizations were on rivers that exited into the sea along the coast. Not inland rivers in the mountains. The way that virtually all of the planet is shaped is that rivers cut the plains. And the plains within valleys along rivers are nearly always seaside. That's where all the best hunting grounds were and that's also the best places for farming.

It's not just the modern world that has the bulk of the population along the coast, but the same was also true in the past and most of the world's modern cities originated on the former coasts. As sea levels rose, many of those cities moved inland as they lost the coastal part of their cities.


Originally posted by punkinworks10
With a few exceptions sea coasts are notoriously hard to make a living along,very much so the more primative the society.


Sea coasts are the easiest to make a living along. Sea side means trade and trade means money. Sea side means tourism and tourism means money.

Even if you are looking at Native Americans who didn't have large ships, the bulk of the native American tribes lived sea side. California for example had over a hundred different tribes living there in the past. In the Gulf of Mexico the bulk of Native American tribes lived sea side, along the plains that were carved out by rivers that exited into the sea. They used the plains carved out by the rivers for farming. Many of the tribes even used sea shells as a form of currency.

Same for China, same for southeast Asia. Same for the Persian Gulf. Same for the Mediterranean. Same for the Aegean.



posted on Jun, 17 2012 @ 11:14 AM
link   

Originally posted by MapMistress

I am thinking about the time period we are talking about. The earliest civilizations were on rivers that exited into the sea along the coast. Not inland rivers in the mountains. The way that virtually all of the planet is shaped is that rivers cut the plains. And the plains within valleys along rivers are nearly always seaside. That's where all the best hunting grounds were and that's also the best places for farming.


Yes we agree the earliest civilizations were inland and the largest on rivers. However you seem to think the coast was extensively occuppied? There is no evidence for that, small groups can live off the sea but until boat, net, hook and line technology was greatly increased, the early civilizations arose along rivers they could irrigate - you cannot irrigate the coast -obviously



Sea coasts are the easiest to make a living along. Sea side means trade and trade means money. Sea side means tourism and tourism means money.


You are thinking 1,000s of year ahead of the time in question. There was little sea trade, there was no money, bulk food was heavy and difficult to transport, sea navigation difficult. Tourism? ah er, see first sentence


Even if you are looking at Native Americans who didn't have large ships, the bulk of the native American tribes lived sea side. California for example had over a hundred different tribes living there in the past.


They weren't civilizations they were small hunter-gathering groups



In the Gulf of Mexico the bulk of Native American tribes lived sea side, along the plains that were carved out by rivers that exited into the sea. They used the plains carved out by the rivers for farming. Many of the tribes even used sea shells as a form of currency.


Nope they lived inland - take a look at how many Maya cities were on the coast versus those inland


Same for China, same for southeast Asia. Same for the Persian Gulf. Same for the Mediterranean. Same for the Aegean.


Nope the Chinese were clustered around their two rivers, the southwest the Mekong, etc

You are getting your eras mixed up, the first true 'seaside' civ were probably the Dilmun who had extensive inland sites with the Minoans being the first true seaborne/sea coast civilization (AFAWK)
edit on 17/6/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2012 @ 11:18 AM
link   

Originally posted by punkinworks10
One thing that has not popped up in this conversation is the role tectonics plays in "apperant" sea levels.
In areas with very active geology, such as portions of the med basin and southeast Asia, seismic events can raise or lower vast pieces land , with respect to the oceans. The 2004 Indonesian quake and the 1964? Quake in alaska are perfect examples of this with both have huge vertical movments of land. In the case of Alaska some areas went up 9meters while others dropped 2-1/2m. In Indonesia the Andaman qnd Nicobar islands dropped several meters.


Yeah, I have to take that into account when I do my sunken coastline maps of the Aegean Basin. Some of the submerged areas just look bizarre because there's so many active faults in the sea.

Areas like south of Milos island, the whole southern section of the island looks stretched out at the Last Glacial Maximum. And that's because there's a plate there that's literally sucking down the land. One plate submerging beneath another plate. Which might mean that there's a few meters difference between present bathymetric measurements and past bathymetric measurements.

Milos, Kimolos, Polyaigos and Andimilos: Coastlines LGM to Present

The main shifts in the plates of the Aegean are slow over time, so I doubt there's more than a 10 meter difference since the LGM.




 
28
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join