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Exceptional Rise in Ancient Sea Levels Revealed

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posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 01:06 AM
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Thanks for the information and the perspectives everyone.




posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 07:30 AM
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Always enjoy your threads Slayer :-)

Im glad you brought this up for discussion as I believe the Earth is always changing ( change is constant) but there are issues such as rising sea levels that make me rise up out of my seat and really become aware of all the other Earth changes that are rapidly taking place.

In my opinion its a cycle that is ending while another ramps up.... I believe new lands will appear while others will be lost. We cant deny what history teaches us.....

We are travelers of light waiting to be seen and or observed by such chaos. Where we have been is also where we are going.

Maybe I think we are truly special.... Or maybe we in our lifetime will indeed witness history in action and observe the power and beauty of our planet Earth!!!!

Time will tell!!



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:06 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Interesting read, thanks Slayer. I have a slight issue with this research though, although i may have misread / misinterpreted so do not mind being corrected!

It says (i think) that results are based on studies of levels in Tahiti. My problem with this being that previous research (last year) by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution stated that post glacial melt off was subject to (potentially dramatic) regional variation. For example, levels in the Caribbean rose much more than levels in, say, European Atlantic coast lines.

Generally speaking, WHOI get things bang on when it comes to anything ocean related. This therefore has far reaching potential for both past and future sea level rise. For the purposes of this forum, therefore, it is no good knowing that sea levels were, say, 80m lower 5'000 years ago - in reality in some places they would be, in others it would be more or less than this.

Basically, what i am trying to unsuccessfully get across is that as interesting as this is, it doesn't necessarily mean much in terms of locating ancient coastlines.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 10:44 AM
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The idea that most of our history is still underwater, and/or ice, today is one I've considered for quite some time. I personally believe there are those who are well aware of what nature has hidden from us, and prefer to keep it that way.

Nevertheless, as more of the private sector, and those who have alternative ideas of history have begun to explore this area of focus, we may very well see history come to light that we can't even fathom at the moment.

And indeed, as our publicly known technology is now making it more and more possible to explore places we couldn't have gone just a few decades ago. I expect that at least some things will, of necessity, have to be conceded by the academia that we had no solid evidence for previously.

That's a day I'm looking forward to.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by Klassified
The idea that most of our history is still underwater, and/or ice, today is one I've considered for quite some time. I personally believe there are those who are well aware of what nature has hidden from us, and prefer to keep it that way.


Who might they be and how do you know of this?


Nevertheless, as more of the private sector, and those who have alternative ideas of history have begun to explore this area of focus, we may very well see history come to light that we can't even fathom at the moment.

And indeed, as our publicly known technology is now making it more and more possible to explore places we couldn't have gone just a few decades ago. I expect that at least some things will, of necessity, have to be conceded by the academia that we had no solid evidence for previously.

That's a day I'm looking forward to.


I would note that 'academia' will be the ones providing you with the information, when and if found, that will change our preceptions.....you seem to be into the 'revenge' mind set I see alot in fringe and alternative thinkers - that at some point evidence will be found by (academia) which you will then use to 'win' over academia? Unfortunately you are in a self identified 'game' with another team that not only doesn't know you exist but that they are playing a game with you.......



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 10:59 AM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


First off....

Thank you for your contribution to the discussion, it is very much appreciated.

Now as far as differing sea level rises around the globe during or around certain closely timed periods. I have posted a few thread with links on articles and have participated in a few threads on related topics by other members. I'll post a few here now which show a similar occurrence for closely timed flooding around the globe.

Now the story they tell is pretty straight forward with regards to massive coastal or regional flooding due to various ice age melt off events. What's at issue are differing interpretations of the data presented.



The above animation I've made shows coastal flooding by ice age melt off. What needs to be noticed is the last 10,000 years or so and watch the various global locations go through massive changes. Now again the debate is whether or not some of these regional flooding events happened rapidly at times and how closely timed did they occur to each other. No one doubts they happened but the Context of when and how rapidly is still up for debate IMO.




Lost civilization may have been beneath Persian Gulf

At its peak, the floodplain now below the Gulf would have been about the size of Great Britain, and then shrank as water began to flood the area. Then, about 8,000 years ago, the land would have been swallowed up by the Indian Ocean

Watery refuge
The Gulf Oasis would have been a shallow inland basin exposed from about 75,000 years ago until 8,000 years ago, forming the southern tip of the Fertile Crescent, according to historical sea-level records.

"Perhaps it is no coincidence that the founding of such remarkably well developed communities along the shoreline corresponds with the flooding of the Persian Gulf basin around 8,000 years ago," Rose said. "These new colonists may have come from the heart of the Gulf, displaced by rising water levels that plunged the once fertile landscape beneath the waters of the Indian Ocean."





Stone Age relics may be hidden in Western Isles' seas

Submerged sites of ancient communities could be hidden in the seas around the Western Isles, according to experts. Dr Jonathan Benjamin and Dr Andrew Bicket believe the islands' long and sheltered lochs have protected 9,000-year-old Mesolithic relics. Rising sea levels may have covered up to 6.2 miles (10km) of land on the west coast of the Outer Hebrides. The archaeologists are to give a presentation in Comhairle nan Eilean Siar's council chambers on Monday.

During the Mesolithic period, also known as the Middle Stone Age, Britain was transformed from a peninsula to an island. It is thought that landslides in Norway - the Storegga Slides - triggered one of the biggest tsunamis ever recorded on Earth when a landlocked sea burst its banks. The water struck the north-east of Britain with such force it travelled 25 miles (40km) inland, turning low-lying plains into what is now the North Sea, and marshlands to the south into the Channel.





Ancient lost city found in the Dardanelles

A settlement area from the pre-historic period has been found in the Dardanelles, according to the head of Troy excavations, Associate Professor Rüstem Aslan.

“We have found a prehistoric settlement dating back to 5,000 B.C. But only 5 percent of the settlement exists,” said Aslan. The archaeology team examined the coast from the entrance of the Dardanelles to Çanakkale city center, he said. “The coastal excavations had been finished and we unearthed something unexpected around Bozköy.”

The settlement was 2,000 years older than Troy,





Interesting tibit

Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) researchers have opened a window into the past by exposing ancient mangrove forests entombed beneath the Great Barrier Reef. AIMS biologist Dr Dan Alongi said the expedition was surveying the impact of nutrients on coastal inshore areas when scientists unearthed mangrove forests in old river channels they believe may snake for 30 kilometres to the edge of the continental shelf. Scientists have long theorised that sea level rose very gradually over several thousand years, but these remnant mangrove forests tell another story. While it was previously known that relic river beds exist beneath the Great Barrier Reef, formed 9000 years ago when the sea level was lower than the continental shelf, their significance was never studied.

"When we took the first samples it was difficult to believe… we stood amazed wondering what exactly we were dealing with. We thought it was cyclone debris, but it was far too deep to be a modern event," said Dr Alongi. AIMS researchers cored 1-2 metres of sediment and found remnant mangrove 70 centimetres below the surface of the present seafloor. These core samples of mud are an evolutionary time frame. The evidence will help to establish the state of the reef and nutrient sediment information as it existed prior to human activity. Dr Alongi said the mangroves were incredibly well preserved; a fact most likely attributed to the antibiotic properties in the concentrated tannins. "The cores still have the characteristic smell of tannins, that’s why we thought they were young.

"Within the cores were intact root systems and parts of trees including twigs and branches that radiocarbon dating put between 8550 and 8740 years of age. "There’s such an abrupt change in core composition from mud-like substance to intact mangrove branches…from the modern to the ancient, that it suggests a large climate change happened," said Dr Alongi.



The question becomes are all these related? Is it a matter of time before we gain a more accurate correlation of events through further studies?
edit on 7-6-2012 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 11:30 AM
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Nice thread. Star and flagged.

I've often thought it beyond coincidence that multiple ancient cultures around the Earth have the "Flood Story" as part of their origin tales. Perhaps it really is one of the oldest stories of an actual event that effected societies around the globe.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Interesting Slayer but one point on the possible Persian gulf to Mesopotamian shift

The problem is the years, given 8,000 for the slow flooding of the gulf and the rise of Sumerian culture at best starting around 4,000 BCE you have a rather large gap. Now before the Sumerians showed up the Ubaidian culture was there.

Now the Ubaidians go back to around 6800 BCE and were in the area now known as southern Iraq however this culture has a strong connection with the Samarra culture in northern Mesopotamia. It was these guys who started growing grain with irrigation

...so we have a gap of around 1,200 years



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by pavil
Nice thread. Star and flagged.

I've often thought it beyond coincidence that multiple ancient cultures around the Earth have the "Flood Story" as part of their origin tales. Perhaps it really is one of the oldest stories of an actual event that effected societies around the globe.


But many of these are rain and river related not a slow rising of the seas plus floods are one of the more common and terrifying natural disasters. It is not known what percentage of people would have lived on the coast versus the interior. Evidence suggests there were only limited folks on the coasts in that time period, nor did many live exactly at sea level



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Hans...

Thanks for the quick reply.

1,200 years give or take is as you know not very long geologically speaking. Let's consider my hypothesis that these events occurred sometimes rapidly and sometimes as been accepted slowly over years. Why couldn't these events have happened in both manners just that the remaining physical evidence is hard to distinguish between to two?

I believe all the events [and I have more but have not presented] are linked or are at the very least very closely related.


edit on 7-6-2012 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Understood, but verbal storytelling for centuries could have spawned the differences in the tales. Still seem like more than a coincidence that there are so many stories of the Great Waters rising and sweeping away civilization. Sometimes myths start from a an actual occurance.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 12:30 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Slayer, no need to create maps. all the time and trouble you had to go through, I found a bunch just like yours here.

Huh?! rofl



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by AlchemicalMonocular
Slayer, no need to create maps. all the time and trouble you had to go through, I found a bunch just like yours here.
Huh?! rofl


I wonder how many of those have been copied and pasted elsewhere from my original use of the animation a few years ago here at ATS?. I also fail to see how this is topic related other than your attempting some sort of half assed thread/topic derailment.

Mind if the rest of us continue with the thread's topic?

Thanks



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 01:42 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69

Originally posted by AlchemicalMonocular
Slayer, no need to create maps. all the time and trouble you had to go through, I found a bunch just like yours here.
Huh?! rofl


I wonder how many of those have been copied and pasted elsewhere from my original use of the animation a few years ago here at ATS?.


All of them!

Of course. lol



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69


1,200 years give or take is as you know not very long geologically speaking. Let's consider my hypothesis that these events occurred sometimes rapidly and sometimes as been accepted slowly over years. Why couldn't these events have happened in both manners just that the remaining physical evidence is hard to distinguish between to two?


I'm talking cultural not geologically, for a culture that is long time for geology a mere flick. I would suspect that surges of water would still have been restrained, especially those thousands of miles away from the point of the waters entry. Additionally people rarely live right at the waters edge , they also tend to have contacts or food resources inland. As for the Ubaidians they don't show up 'highly culturated' their culture evolves in situ until they are taken over by the Sumerians who absorb most of their culture and it is that hybrid which gives us the first 'civilization'


I believe all the events [and I have more but have not presented] are linked or are at the very least very closely related.


We look forward to seeing it



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 04:10 PM
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very interesting thread. I heard a scientist on coasttocoastam last week discussing the idea that earth was passing through the tail of a comet and that's where all the rain and extra water came from for 40 days.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by schuyler
 


I have some of his books on the subject. I disagree with his notion of an ancient "Global Civilization" I do feel however that there were a few slightly advanced early coastal cultures/possible civilizations which had to uproot and head inland to higher ground and reestablish themselves.


I sometimes think that what we shouldn't discount is that we were already advanced intellectually, and that the development of civilisation was in fact reactionary to these incredible, and probably traumatic changes to their lives and environments. The brain itself reached it's current size 150,000 years ago, so we must have had pretty complex thoughts and processes to occupy that brain, including complex societies. It seems much more likely, given the extant evidence and the pattern that seems to be more and more confirmed with new discoveries, that something happened to change the way we chose to live. Perhaps these changes in sea levels, and more likely, the flash flooding and mud slides that would have accompanied them, that we drew together out of fear and created order from the chaos as a means to cope.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:21 PM
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Slayer, you may be interested in this. It's an animation of the peopling of the world done by the Bradshaw Foundation. It would be lovely if I could embed it here, but I'm not sure that's possible.

Great animation you provided, though I must admit I'm having a hard time reading it. Not enough contrast for old eyes like mine!



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


Very good representation but based on data nearly ten years old, missing the possible interaction between the HSS and HEF, Denisovans and HSN



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler
Slayer, you may be interested in this. It's an animation of the peopling of the world done by the Bradshaw Foundation. It would be lovely if I could embed it here, but I'm not sure that's possible.

Great animation you provided, though I must admit I'm having a hard time reading it. Not enough contrast for old eyes like mine!


Those "old eyes" have seen the times though haven't they, M.



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