It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Ohio runner stops in state final to aid fallen opponent

page: 5
12
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 11:25 AM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Wow, what stupid statements you made here today, ignorant replies. Anyhow, she was stupid she helped out someone who fell, you know, another human being, not just another number.

I must be just as stupid for I would have done the same thing. Useless eater ever heard of that term? In the end that is what you seem to be. So what would you have done? Kicked her on your way to the finish and go " haha! I just beat that person laying on the ground, let's celebrate!!

And even if some aid was on place, it's the principle of tending a helping hand. Now, I know your stan e on helping others so this is where my posting stops, you are a lost cause, wouldn't have you on my team... Then again, I could be the one tending my hand towards you as you lay on the ground... But you, obviously wouldn't take it, would you?




posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 11:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by Whateva69
reply to post by getreadyalready
 

Yeah i know shame on me.
I was just a little bit annoyed thinking if it was me i'd want some compassion


love and harmony
Whateva


I wonder if you really would though?

If you trained for months or years to run a race. And you got to the race, and you ran 99.375% of it, and then something happened... either you were a little dehydrated and you exhausted, or your blood chemistry was off just a little and your glucose and creatine stores were exhausted, or maybe you strained a hammy, or twisted an ankle. After all those months, or years of training, would you really want someone to help you 20m across the finish line, or would you want to do it yourself?

If you were injured, you probably wouldn't want to move and risk making it worse. If you were just exhausted, you would probably want the thrill of crawling across the line under your own power.

If you haven't ever been in that position, it might be hard to understand, but I highly doubt you would actually want the help. Either you are injured, or you are exhausted, and either way, it isn't very helpful to have someone come force you back to your feet, and force you across the line. ESPECIALLY if you are worried about being disqualified!



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 11:36 AM
link   
reply to post by NoLoveInFear46and2
 


I agree, lost cause.

I don't see how moving an injured person 20m farther away from the help, getting them disqualified, and letting down my own team in the process is an honorable or compassionate duty. I see you as an equally lost cause.


And no, you wouldn't have me on your team, because I like to keep score, and I like to win, and even when I lose, I like to do it with honor.


But you, obviously wouldn't take it, would you?


No, I wouldn't, I would get across the finish line under my own power, or I would wait for the medics and professional help, I wouldn't take your hand, because it doesn't make any sense to do so, it just ruins both of our races.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 12:41 PM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


What a real man!! A man's man!!!
Alright nevermind, the only reasoning that exists and is correct is yours all mighty one!



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 01:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by NoLoveInFear46and2
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


What a real man!! A man's man!!!
Alright nevermind, the only reasoning that exists and is correct is yours all mighty one!


See, I knew we could agree on something.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 02:47 PM
link   
reply to post by ripcontrol
 


Guess there really are good pepole out there

S&F



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 03:32 PM
link   

Originally posted by PvtHudson
I know its easy to feel good about this story and prattle on about "sportsmanship", but the truth is she lost. they both lost.What good did it do anyone?


It showed she is a mature person who places more importance on people than silly sporting events that are meaningless in the long run. This is a woman who will go places and make a difference in the world.

What kind of person places winning a race above helping another in need? A sociopath perhaps?

Sometimes being a winner is tantamount to being a real loser and losing for a noble reason makes one a true winner.

Bravo to this young woman.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 05:41 PM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Yes i would, but i also think it depends on a persons character.
I still think its brilliant that some people can forget about their own goals in an instant to help someone else out.

This is what some of us call a hero. its a selfless act and people should applaud it.


love and harmony
Whateva



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 07:28 AM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 



Or a lifelong looking for handouts and someone else to push you across the finish line every time things get hard?


I can relate with your pessimism, but I don't share it.


Perhaps a life of forgetting where your loyalties lie and helping total strangers that may or may not appreciate or desire your help, and in the process ignoring your own family or team?


Digression: I like to think that I'm circumspect & ... adaptive. With that I'll concede your speculation is equally moot as mine.


Yep, it is hard to say what the final effect will be, but what we can say for sure is that the rules forebade it, and most high-level competitors would not have appreciated it, and it didn't help her own teammates in the slightest bit.


Safe to say I'm not as rule centric as your response implies.

In any case I did not interpret the girl's decision to aid another runner as undermining the fabric of law and/or rule-abiding. So a rule forbade aiding a fallen runner? Give me a break. The gal made a moral choice that some rule could not capture when it was devised, & yet you mock her decission despite that no one suffered injury from the act. Pfft. For the sake of consistency I feel within my right to presume you've stored the fed register, your state's register, your county's register, and your city's register on some nifty handheld technology so you may always refer to the rules when you're uncertain, despite that x or y rule may prove injurious to you or loyalties you avow.


edit on 10-6-2012 by Kovenov because: clarified



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 08:33 AM
link   
reply to post by Kovenov
 



Pfft. For the sake of consistency I feel within my right to presume you've stored the fed register, your state's register, your county's register, and your city's register on some nifty handheld technology so you may always refer to the rules when you're uncertain, despite that x or y rule may prove injurious to you or loyalties you avow.


No, quite the opposite. I'm a pretty consistent rule-breaker.
I only follow the rules I agree with, or the rules that are convenient to follow, or the rules where the risk outweighs the reward.

To be fair, every race competitor knows the rule about assisting another runner. This isn't something anyone would do without knowing the consequences.

In this particular case, there are plenty of reasons where I might have broken the rule. If they were on a deserted part of a road course, or if this were somebody's last race of their career, or if it were a fallen teammate, maybe it would have been worth helping.

My problem is the risk of disqualification, and the risk of injury did not outweigh the reward of....... what?

What was the reward? She helped her from last place to last place but took great risk in doing so. She helped her travel 20m on an injury. There was no reward for the action for either competitor, but there was a lot of risk involved. It was just a stupid decision to make. I'm sure she is a wonderful girl, and I'm sure she had the best intentions, but people calling her a hero, or saying they would hire her are also making stupid decisions. They were not in the Sahara, and she didn't pull her to safety, she just helped her 20m across a finish line, which was a poor decision, because it could have hurt her or disqualified them both. Why would you reward someone for a dumb decision, and why would you hire someone that makes bad decisions?



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 08:47 AM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 



Why would you reward someone for a dumb decision, and why would you hire someone that makes bad decisions?


Eh, so our respective outlooks about her act is probably irreconcilable.

Goes to show that R. Paul supporters don't always agree.


Take it easy.



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 08:50 AM
link   

Originally posted by Kovenov
reply to post by getreadyalready
 



Why would you reward someone for a dumb decision, and why would you hire someone that makes bad decisions?


Eh, so our respective outlooks about her act is probably irreconcilable.

Goes to show that R. Paul supporters don't always agree.


Take it easy.


Lately I've been taking heat for criticizing Ron Paul too. He's still the best candidate by far, but I think he totally screwed up his campaign either intentionally, or just by poor management and strategic decisions.

I shouldn't be so harsh on the girl, I'm sure she had good intentions, I just don't understand all the praise she is getting? She should have gotten a slap on the wrist for it, and her coaches should have reminded her there are race personnel all around to help the fallen girl, and that she is lucky she didn't get disqualified and hurt the team standings. She just didn't think through all the negative repercussions vs. the little to no benefit of her action.



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 11:45 PM
link   
There's more to winning than being first across the line. Maybe this was her way of winning. What if in the future the girl that was helped does the same for someone else, only because someone did the same for her. I would call that losing the battle but winning the war.



new topics

top topics



 
12
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join