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Operation Major Domo & Dissecting A Code Name: Frog – part 1 & 2 [with prime focus on part 1]

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posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 02:30 PM
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Explanation: Due to research I was performing, for another ATS thread about a Star Trek set designers input into the US Armys Command Centers, I chanced upon an old b&w picture of some 1960's Command Center and clicking onto that webpage [it was found using google images search] I found it to be both highly informative and worthy of bring to my fellow ATS members [and guests] attention!

A Code Name: Frog Part One (by Steve Marshall aka firegeezer on August 23, 2010) [firegeezer.com]

1stly The picture that drew my attention to this interesting subject ...


Inside The Frog command center. (U. S. Army photo)




Firegeezer cyberspondent and famed Gnome handler, Steve Marshall recently came across some previously- undisclosed U. S. Army reports that have been declassified. They have had some direct influence on the fire and rescue service, both directly and indirectly Steve has graciously taken the effort to summarize them and prepare them for your enlightenment and education. This is a two-part report.


And a tidbit about the Frog ...


After his death, I found several brief cases with his Army papers in it. This guy had been into everything, but a project code named “The Frog” caught my eye and it explained so much about the man. Officially, the project was known as the “AN/ MSQ19 ATOC” for “automated tactical operations center”, the Army’s first mobile computer system. The project, when completed, would have to pass a final test of it’s abilities and that would be called “Operation Major Domo”.


And now the shocker ...


In the end, $25 million and 2 years of experimenting had produced a calculator that required 5 tractor trailers to haul it, plus 2 additional large trucks to haul electrical generators to power it, PLUS it needed its own portable buildings to house the operators and numerous operating consoles.




You'll see why thats a shocker if you check the above link for the full story!


Personal Disclosure: Here is the link to part 2. (Which is unrelated to the main interests of this thread but I am still interested in discussing the articulated army vehicles mentioned in part 2 if other members wish to post about them.)




posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 06:16 PM
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In the end, $25 million and 2 years of experimenting had produced a calculator that required 5 tractor trailers to haul it, plus 2 additional large trucks to haul electrical generators to power it, PLUS it needed its own portable buildings to house the operators and numerous operating consoles.


LOL! Thank goodness our current military minds that host such research and development activities aren't as reckless with spending as they were once before


I wonder what other stories like this can be found...

I'd have to wonder if the use of private companies to develop technologies drastically changes the use of funds, in regards to efficiency and related costs...

Although... to kinda put this into perspective... lets say the military wants to develop some time traveling device... and spends $2 Billion, and the result is successful but the infrastructure takes up 10 sq miles, and requires 500 people to operate it. Some then might suggest it was a waste of money and time 100 years down the road when this technology is available for $25,000 a unit, smaller than a car... and only requires one person to operate it...

meh... screw it, these guys were idiots... thanks for the calculator!




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